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Schwarzenegger S Budget

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2010 | By Charles Ornstein and Tracy Weber
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger called Friday for 107 new investigative staffers to improve the discipline of errant nurses and other health professionals, a rare push for more in a budget proposing less in almost every area. The $12.8-million spending request came as Schwarzenegger proposed deep cuts throughout state government for the fiscal 2011 budget. If approved, the additional staff would be paid from the individual budgets of healthcare boards, which are supported by licensing fees.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2010 | By Shane Goldmacher, Los Angeles Times
Proposing a budget that would eliminate the state's welfare-to-work program and most child care for the poor, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Friday outlined a stark vision of a California that would sharply limit aid to some of its poorest and neediest citizens. His $83.4-billion plan would also freeze funding for local schools, further cut state workers' pay and take away 60% of state money for local mental health programs. State parks and higher education are among the few areas the governor's proposal would spare.
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OPINION
January 14, 2005
Re " 'Broken System' Budget Unveiled," Jan. 11: I think I have finally figured out where we need to look for our politicians. We've tried lawyers, businessmen and entertainers, and where has that gotten us? They don't think in the right terms. They are all basically out for self-protection. We need to look at successful leaders of nonprofit organizations. They are the ones who figure out how to help the most people with the least amount of money. They are used to thinking about the "greater good," rather than the next quarter's profits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2010 | By Shane Goldmacher
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has put organized labor squarely in his cross-hairs in 2010, opening a fight that will largely determine the shape of his final year in office. Schwarzenegger's proposals would cut the size of the union workforce, reduce pay, shrink future pensions and roll back job protections won through collective bargaining. Labor and the unions' Democratic allies are already girding for battle. "It's a continuing jihad against organized labor," said Steve Maviglio, a Sacramento-based Democratic strategist.
OPINION
January 15, 2004
Re "Burton Calls Budget Plan 'Unworthy,' " Jan. 13: Although no one -- including, likely, our new governor himself -- can be totally happy about the drastic measures required in the proposed budget, I am surprised that state Senate Leader John Burton (D-San Francisco) has the audacity to call it "unworthy." Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger inherited an astronomical budget deficit mostly brought on by reckless spending and poor budgeting under Burton's watch during Gov. Gray Davis' administration, and the only solution Burton can offer is to raise more taxes?
OPINION
August 10, 2009 | Andrea Lynn Hoch and Jennifer Rockwell, Andrea Lynn Hoch is the legal affairs secretary for Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. Jennifer Rockwell is chief counsel, California Department of Finance.
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger promised the people of California a balanced budget that closes the deficit and includes a healthy reserve that would allow us to respond to natural disasters and serve as a cushion in case revenues continue to fall. Yet two weeks ago, the Legislature sent the governor a budget that not only lacked a reserve but left our state $157 million in the red. Therefore, the governor used his customary, constitutional line-item-veto authority to make additional cuts in spending.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2010 | By Shane Goldmacher, Los Angeles Times
Proposing a budget that would eliminate the state's welfare-to-work program and most child care for the poor, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Friday outlined a stark vision of a California that would sharply limit aid to some of its poorest and neediest citizens. His $83.4-billion plan would also freeze funding for local schools, further cut state workers' pay and take away 60% of state money for local mental health programs. State parks and higher education are among the few areas the governor's proposal would spare.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2010 | By Shane Goldmacher
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has put organized labor squarely in his cross-hairs in 2010, opening a fight that will largely determine the shape of his final year in office. Schwarzenegger's proposals would cut the size of the union workforce, reduce pay, shrink future pensions and roll back job protections won through collective bargaining. Labor and the unions' Democratic allies are already girding for battle. "It's a continuing jihad against organized labor," said Steve Maviglio, a Sacramento-based Democratic strategist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2010 | By Charles Ornstein and Tracy Weber
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger called Friday for 107 new investigative staffers to improve the discipline of errant nurses and other health professionals, a rare push for more in a budget proposing less in almost every area. The $12.8-million spending request came as Schwarzenegger proposed deep cuts throughout state government for the fiscal 2011 budget. If approved, the additional staff would be paid from the individual budgets of healthcare boards, which are supported by licensing fees.
OPINION
August 10, 2009 | Andrea Lynn Hoch and Jennifer Rockwell, Andrea Lynn Hoch is the legal affairs secretary for Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. Jennifer Rockwell is chief counsel, California Department of Finance.
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger promised the people of California a balanced budget that closes the deficit and includes a healthy reserve that would allow us to respond to natural disasters and serve as a cushion in case revenues continue to fall. Yet two weeks ago, the Legislature sent the governor a budget that not only lacked a reserve but left our state $157 million in the red. Therefore, the governor used his customary, constitutional line-item-veto authority to make additional cuts in spending.
OPINION
January 14, 2005
Re " 'Broken System' Budget Unveiled," Jan. 11: I think I have finally figured out where we need to look for our politicians. We've tried lawyers, businessmen and entertainers, and where has that gotten us? They don't think in the right terms. They are all basically out for self-protection. We need to look at successful leaders of nonprofit organizations. They are the ones who figure out how to help the most people with the least amount of money. They are used to thinking about the "greater good," rather than the next quarter's profits.
OPINION
January 15, 2004
Re "Burton Calls Budget Plan 'Unworthy,' " Jan. 13: Although no one -- including, likely, our new governor himself -- can be totally happy about the drastic measures required in the proposed budget, I am surprised that state Senate Leader John Burton (D-San Francisco) has the audacity to call it "unworthy." Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger inherited an astronomical budget deficit mostly brought on by reckless spending and poor budgeting under Burton's watch during Gov. Gray Davis' administration, and the only solution Burton can offer is to raise more taxes?
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