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October 8, 2013 | By Anne Harnagel
It's elementary--or is it? Sherlock Holmes and his investigative powers are the subject of an interactive exhibition opening Thursday at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry in Portland. Visitors will learn about Holmes and his methods, the world that inspired Holmes' creator, Arthur Conan Doyle, and the history of forensic science. Expect footprints and splatter patterns too.  Museum-goers also will have a chance to develop their detective powers by using a book of clues instead of the museum map while trying to crack a Sherlock Holmes mystery written especially for the show by Conan Doyle biographer Daniel Stashower.
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NEWS
October 8, 2013 | By Anne Harnagel
It's elementary--or is it? Sherlock Holmes and his investigative powers are the subject of an interactive exhibition opening Thursday at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry in Portland. Visitors will learn about Holmes and his methods, the world that inspired Holmes' creator, Arthur Conan Doyle, and the history of forensic science. Expect footprints and splatter patterns too.  Museum-goers also will have a chance to develop their detective powers by using a book of clues instead of the museum map while trying to crack a Sherlock Holmes mystery written especially for the show by Conan Doyle biographer Daniel Stashower.
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NEWS
February 23, 1988
Anna E. Loebbecke, 76, founder of Pasadena's Villa Esperanza Guild. She also founded the Muses, a support group for the California Museum of Science and Industry, and was an active supporter of the Roosevelt School for the Handicapped in Pasadena. In Pasadena on Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1998
Re "Say Goodbye to La-La Land," Commentary, Jan. 26: Eli Broad neglected to include two major museums that are on the southern end of downtown Los Angeles. The state's complex, which will include the new Museum of Science and Industry and the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History, has been in Exposition Park for many, many years. He should come to the Natural History Museum some day to observe the glee that children express when they see the dueling dinosaurs in the entry. Both of these museums accommodate thousands of school-age children as well as many adults who get enjoyment and knowledge from the exhibits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1987
I agree with John L. Graham ("Learn Foreign Languages . . .," Op-Ed Page, Oct. 8) that American science and industry need to pay more attention to innovations published in foreign journals, but I do not agree with his solution. He proposes that students should learn more foreign languages in order to read this literature. With valuable research appearing in languages as diverse as Japanese, German and Russian, however, requiring science and engineering students to learn these numerous languages is not a cost-effective solution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1992
Buzz Aldrin's article on your Commentary page (July 21) was outstanding. It brings an imaginative new approach to our long-troubled space station. His ideas deserve serious attention because of his achievements. He has not spent his life behind a desk, but has had a distinguished career as an astronaut. He was the second man to step on the moon, and all the pictures you see of an astronaut on the moon during the first landing are of Aldrin, because Neil Armstrong was using the camera.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1987
Your story on the DC-8 now parked in front of the California Museum of Science and Industry (Metro, Nov. 28) was great, but incomplete. True, United Airlines donated the airliner. But the men and women of McDonnell Douglas, Long Beach, who built the aircraft, were also responsible for disassembling it, moving it and reassembling it. The cost was divided between Personnel Community Services, our employee charity program, and the McDonnell Douglas Foundation. NISSEN DAVIS Director of Communications Douglas Aircraft Co. Long Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1996
Re "The 'Big Wow,' " April 18: Los Angeles is establishing a pattern of turning misfortune into benefit, if you look at recent events. When most of the buildings of the California Museum of Science and Industry were closed because they did not meet the earthquake code, it seemed a terrible blow. Now, after several years, enormous work and $264 million, a wonderful new facility, with the improved name of California ScienCenter, is emerging. The same pattern of rebirth occurred with our Los Angeles Public Library and Hollywood Library.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1997
I am a teacher at Vinedale Elementary School in Sun Valley. I am writing to publicly thank the Maxwell H. Gluck Foundation and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County for making the Earth Mobile possible. My children had the opportunity recently to participate in the "hands on" archeology program and learn about Native American culture as well as experience the job of an archeologist. I am also writing to encourage other foundations and cultural centers to get involved in our children's education.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1985
My brother and I went to see the "India, a Festival of Science" exhibit at the California Museum of Science and Industry last weekend. What a boring and ungratifying waste of time that was! Essentially, we got a display of booths depicting "advanced" technology in India via some lame photographs that look like something out of a seventh grade (no, make it fifth grade) social studies class. Yes, there were some cheap Indian manufactured appliances (such as calculators)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1997
I am a teacher at Vinedale Elementary School in Sun Valley. I am writing to publicly thank the Maxwell H. Gluck Foundation and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County for making the Earth Mobile possible. My children had the opportunity recently to participate in the "hands on" archeology program and learn about Native American culture as well as experience the job of an archeologist. I am also writing to encourage other foundations and cultural centers to get involved in our children's education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1996
Re "The 'Big Wow,' " April 18: Los Angeles is establishing a pattern of turning misfortune into benefit, if you look at recent events. When most of the buildings of the California Museum of Science and Industry were closed because they did not meet the earthquake code, it seemed a terrible blow. Now, after several years, enormous work and $264 million, a wonderful new facility, with the improved name of California ScienCenter, is emerging. The same pattern of rebirth occurred with our Los Angeles Public Library and Hollywood Library.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1995 | NONA YATES
Children can participate in safe and educational Halloween fare this week: Youths, ages 5 to 13, can "bone up" on the human skeleton, visit the science haunted house or explore the life of nocturnal animals at hands-on science workshops offered at the California Museum of Science and Industry on Saturday and Sunday. (213) 744-7444. The Los Angeles Zoo's "Boo at the Zoo" offers children's activities Saturday and Sunday, including meeting animal keepers at "Creeper Keeper Close-Ups" and trick-or-treating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1994 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There were no slams into the net or head-first dives into the sand when two beach volleyball stars squared off against each other in the most unusual game ever played in Los Angeles. That's because there was no net and no sand as top-ranked players Kent Steffes and Kevin Waterbury competed near Downtown. No ball, either. The pair were playing "virtual reality" volleyball.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1992
On behalf of the staff, boards and supporters of the California Afro-American Museum (CAAM), I wish to express my deep appreciation for your fair and timely editorial ("Save These Two Local Treasures," June 29) on the predicament of both CAAM and the Museum of Science and Industry. Since its publication, we have experienced a modest increase in support by the corporate community, with TRW and GTE among the most recent companies that have provided funding for museum programs and issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1992
Buzz Aldrin's article on your Commentary page (July 21) was outstanding. It brings an imaginative new approach to our long-troubled space station. His ideas deserve serious attention because of his achievements. He has not spent his life behind a desk, but has had a distinguished career as an astronaut. He was the second man to step on the moon, and all the pictures you see of an astronaut on the moon during the first landing are of Aldrin, because Neil Armstrong was using the camera.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1989
The story (Part II, Aug. 6) regarding the California Museum of Science and Industry . . . suggests that legislators are upset with former executive director Don Muchmore (and) creates a false impression. To the contrary, with the exception of one Los Angeles area Assembly member, Muchmore is well respected and is considered to have performed a near-miracle at the museum. According to your own story, Muchmore raised $4.1 million during the last year. That works out to over $341,666 each month or $15,530 per average work day. The big losers in this matter are our children and, yes, the taxpayer who will have to make up the inevitable losses caused by Muchmore's departure.
NEWS
June 2, 1985
I am writing in response to your article on Don Muchmore, director of the Museum of Science and Industry ("Controversy Dogs Director of Science Museum" by Beth Ann Krier, May 16). In your attempt to present a balanced picture of Muchmore and his accomplishments on behalf of the museum, you inadvertently cast aspersions on the quality and dedication of the staff that helped Muchmore accomplish what he has. I was the administrator of the California Afro-American Museum, which shares the same campus with the Museum of Science and Industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1989
The story (Part II, Aug. 6) regarding the California Museum of Science and Industry . . . suggests that legislators are upset with former executive director Don Muchmore (and) creates a false impression. To the contrary, with the exception of one Los Angeles area Assembly member, Muchmore is well respected and is considered to have performed a near-miracle at the museum. According to your own story, Muchmore raised $4.1 million during the last year. That works out to over $341,666 each month or $15,530 per average work day. The big losers in this matter are our children and, yes, the taxpayer who will have to make up the inevitable losses caused by Muchmore's departure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1989 | NONA YATES
The newest exhibit at the California Museum of Science and Industry in Exposition Park provides a challenging look at two powerful forces--electricity and magnetism. "Invisible Forces/Electricity and Magnetism" examines through the use of hands-on experimentation the basic science of electromagnetic forces. Children and adults can explore the intricate pathways of a microchip through a microscope, power an electromagnet or experience the charge of static electricity in this latest addition to the museum.
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