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July 22, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
On a recent Tuesday, the leader of the French Toast Mafia looked harmless. She wore a lime-green shirt featuring Carlton from "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air" and her mafia "thugs" were 17 smiling high schoolers in slacks and black polos. But she does want her bunch to enter some big battles. Specifically, Kim Merino is worried because of the nearly 4,000 students who took the Advanced Placement computer science exam in California last year, not even 400 of them were black or Latino.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
On a recent Tuesday, the leader of the French Toast Mafia looked harmless. She wore a lime-green shirt featuring Carlton from "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air" and her mafia "thugs" were 17 smiling high schoolers in slacks and black polos. But she does want her bunch to enter some big battles. Specifically, Kim Merino is worried because of the nearly 4,000 students who took the Advanced Placement computer science exam in California last year, not even 400 of them were black or Latino.
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OPINION
July 17, 2009 | Wendy Orent, Wendy Orent is the author of "Plague: The Mysterious Past and Terrifying Future of the World's Most Dangerous Disease."
After the anthrax letter attacks of October 2001, the Bush administration pledged $57 billion to keep the nation safe from bioterror. Since then, the government has created a vast network of laboratories and institutions to track down and block every remotely conceivable form of bioterror threat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2013 | By Larry Gordon and Monte Morin, Los Angeles Times
The president of Caltech, Jean-Lou Chameau, announced Tuesday that he would step down from the leadership of the prestigious science- and math-oriented campus in Pasadena at the end of the current school year and become head of a new and well-endowed university in Saudi Arabia. Chameau, a French-born civil engineer, has been president of Caltech since 2006 and helped the school maintain its high international academic rankings and achieve greater financial stability during a recessionary period of retrenchment at many other colleges, education experts said.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1990 | From Reuters
Japan, the world's biggest exporter of high-technology goods, should channel more of its technological prowess into improving the quality of life, a government agency said today. The Science and Technology Agency, in an annual policy statement, said science and technology should make a greater contribution to improving health and living standards and cleaning up the environment in Japan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1985
I was pleased to see your editorial (Nov. 6), "An Investment in Science," noting the National Academy of Sciences plans to build a West Coast headquarters in California. On the same day you published the editorial, I co-chaired a statewide conference on industrial competitiveness at which many leading business executives and educators endorsed a program to extend to our secondary schools the science and technology leadership that we enjoy in our universities. We need in our public schools an exemplary program to groom future innovators and Nobel prize winners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2000 | Alex Murashko, (714) 966-5974
More than 25 businesses and public service agencies will be on hand at a Career Fair hosted by Westminster High School and Coastline Regional Occupational Program from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 16. Students will have an opportunity to talk with professionals representing Westminster High School's six career pathways. The areas include arts, communication, business, marketing, science and technology.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2008 | Jean Merl
Two scholars from local universities are among eight recipients of the National Medal of Science, the nation's highest honor for science and technology. Leonard Kleinrock of UCLA and Andrew J. Viterbi of USC were among the 2007 laureates announced Monday by President Bush in Washington. The National Medal of Science honors individuals for pioneering research in such fields as physical, biological, mathematical, social, behavioral and engineering sciences. The National Science Foundation administers the award, which was established by Congress in 1959.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
Students from Western Avenue Elementary's special education classes sat in the shade and counted rings on "tree cookies" taken from redwoods on a recent field trip. "This is where learning comes alive and is more meaningful," said teacher Mysie Dela Pena about the Christensen Math Science and Technology Center in San Pedro. "We talk about a lot of these elements in the classroom, but this is where they get the experience firsthand. " The interactive life science classroom is a beleaguered survivor of the Los Angeles Unified School District's budget cuts.
SCIENCE
October 5, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
With the U.S. economy struggling to gain steam and tensions flaring in the Middle East, discussion of science policy has taken a back seat in the presidential campaign. But a group of voters concerned about the state of American science has solicited the opinions of both candidates on a variety of issues related to research, technology, energy and the environment. ScienceDebate.org - an effort supported by the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science, the National Academies and the Council on Competitiveness, among others - compiled a list of 14 questions and posed them to President Obama and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2012 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
UC Irvine is home to a new $12.5-million research center funded by chip maker Intel Corp., the company announced Tuesday. The center, called the Intel Science and Technology Center for Social Computing, applies social science and humanities to the design and analysis of digital information. It opened June 1 but was announced Tuesday by Justin Rattner, Intel chief technology officer, in San Francisco. "Technology is profoundly entangled with our everyday lives. As researchers, we can't get a handle on what's going on by looking at technical factors alone," said UC Irvine professor Paul Dourish, who will co-lead the center.
HEALTH
March 14, 2012 | By John Hoeffel
Newt Gingrich wanted to show up in the Chicago suburbs Wednesday with two new reasons Republicans should make him their presidential nominee: Alabama and Mississippi. Instead, with two more losses and no momentum boost, he stuck to an old standby: He's the smartest guy in the race. Putting himself in the company of Abraham Lincoln and Ronald Reagan, he argued that he is the only candidate running in the GOP contests who gets science and technology and who knows how to employ it to revolutionize the federal government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2011 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
It was the first New World Festival of Eco-Friendly Science and Technology and quite possibly the last. The event near the beach in Santa Monica, which had been scheduled to run through Sunday, was shut down abruptly Saturday afternoon. Its website had promised robots, a petting zoo, six stages of live music and more than 150 exhibits. But the gathering on Saturday looked more like a medium-sized, eco-friendly farmers market. Howard Mauskopf, the festival's organizer, said he needed to shut down because so few people had shown up. "We're in a position where we don't have the financial ability to continue," he said, adding that he would have needed eight to 10 times the crowd that was present to make ends meet.
OPINION
June 27, 2010 | Ahmed Zewail
In today's world, America's soft power is commonly thought to reside in the global popularity of Hollywood movies, Coca-Cola, McDonald's and Starbucks. But the facts tell a different story. In a recent poll involving 43 countries, 79% of respondents said that what they most admire about the United States is its leadership in science and technology. The artifacts of the American entertainment industry came in a distant second. In the 1970s, what I, as a young foreign student studying in the United States, found most dynamic, exciting and impressive about this country is what much of the world continues to value most about the U.S. today: its open intellectual culture, its great universities, its capacity for discovery and innovation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1987 | United Press International
Colombian President Virgilio Barco underwent emergency surgery for peritonitis Tuesday shortly after arriving in Seoul, officials said. A nurse at Seoul National University Hospital confirmed Barco had undergone surgery but would not reveal details. A statement from the presidential palace in Bogota, Colombia, said Barco had peritonitis and "suffered an acute perforation in the diverticulum of the colon." No other details were provided immediately.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1996
The headline in the March 12 paper loomed out: "Laguna Preparing Layoff Notices for Teachers." In the article it states they may cancel many of the special programs, i.e., music, drama, science and technology classes. Not all children find algebra, math, history, etc., that fascinating; most children do find art and music stimulating enough to keep them in school. In our society today, all one has to do is pick up a paper or turn on the television news and witness a killing, bombing in our schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2009 | By Amina Khan
Eleven weeks after opening, Los Angeles Unified's newest middle school still gleams. Science classrooms sport chemical eyewashes and emergency showers. Teachers deliver lessons in surround-sound with hands-free microphones. Kids play basketball on rooftop courts. Yet what stands out most about Young Oak Kim Academy is that it is the district's only single-sex middle school. Classes are either all male or all female. During "biology Jeopardy," the girls stood on tiptoe, quivering hands stretched to the ceiling, as science teacher Amber Green called out categories -- organelles for 200, types of cells for 500. For their four-person "edible cell" group projects, students pulled out their building materials -- licorice, jelly beans and other candies -- and after a brief buzz of consultation, each member heads to a computer or the supply closet to complete her assigned task.
NATIONAL
October 23, 2009 | Office of the Press Secretary, The White House
12:44 P.M. EDT THE PRESIDENT: Thank you very much. Please, have a seat. Thank you. Thank you, MIT. (Applause.) I am -- I am hugely honored to be here. It's always been a dream of mine to visit the most prestigious school in Cambridge, Massachusetts. (Applause.) Hold on a second -- certainly the most prestigious school in this part of Cambridge, Massachusetts. (Laughter.) And I'll probably be here for a while -- I understand a bunch of engineering students put my motorcade on top of Building 10. (Laughter.
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