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ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2010
In a cosmic reading mood? Let these three forthcoming books satisfy your search for fresh, unexpected insights into the nature of the universe. God, free will, quantum versus Newtonian theories — no subject is too big (or nanoscopic) for Cambridge theorist Stephen Hawking who, with Caltech's Leonard Mlodinow, gives readers another graceful, slender guide to the workings of the cosmos in "The Grand Design" (Bantam). "Until the advent of modern physics," the authors write, "it was generally thought that all knowledge of the world could be obtained through direct observation, that things are what they seem."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2010 | Alie Ward
When Mary Roach describes her writing process, she is nothing if not self-deprecating. "I always know that there will be three or four months of utter confusion and no sense of what the book will be," she admits. "Usually there's a period of low-grade panic, of sad flailing. " The 51-year old author started her writing career as a copy editor and publicist before penning her first freelance column for the San Francisco Examiner. With her 2003 debut book "Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers," she unwittingly launched a bestselling series of hybrid humor/science books that includes "Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife" and "Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex. " Speaking via phone from her home in Oakland, she recounts her expectations for "Stiff": "I thought it was a one-off for sure.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2000 | IRENE GARCIA
Griffin Frazen, an eighth-grader at Millikan Middle School, is only 13, but he's practically an expert on exotic creatures. He'll tell you that a dik dik is a small, crossbred deer with no antlers and that an angwantibo, similar to a lemur, is known for its large eyes and lives in the African forest. "The kiwi is one of my favorites," Griffin said. "It's a bird with no wings that lives mainly in Indonesia."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2010
In a cosmic reading mood? Let these three forthcoming books satisfy your search for fresh, unexpected insights into the nature of the universe. God, free will, quantum versus Newtonian theories — no subject is too big (or nanoscopic) for Cambridge theorist Stephen Hawking who, with Caltech's Leonard Mlodinow, gives readers another graceful, slender guide to the workings of the cosmos in "The Grand Design" (Bantam). "Until the advent of modern physics," the authors write, "it was generally thought that all knowledge of the world could be obtained through direct observation, that things are what they seem."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Herman Schneider, 98, a writer best known for his science books for children, died July 31 in Boston. The cause of death was not reported. Collaborating frequently with his wife, Nina, Schneider wrote books including "How Big Is Big? From Stars to Atoms, a Yardstick for the Universe" and "Let's Look Under the City: Water, Gas, Waste, Electricity, Telephone." Among the works he wrote under his own name were "Everyday Machines and How They Work" and "Everyday Weather and How It Works."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1999 | CATHERINE BLAKE
Mayor Ellen Hall presented the Ojai Library with a check for $20,000 this week to update its book collection. The money will be used to purchase more than 1,000 science books during the next six months. "It is more critical to replace old science books, because the information is changing daily, than it is to replace an old dictionary," said Kit Willis, library supervisor. The Ojai City Council voted earlier this year to contribute $40,000 to the Ojai Library.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2010 | Alie Ward
When Mary Roach describes her writing process, she is nothing if not self-deprecating. "I always know that there will be three or four months of utter confusion and no sense of what the book will be," she admits. "Usually there's a period of low-grade panic, of sad flailing. " The 51-year old author started her writing career as a copy editor and publicist before penning her first freelance column for the San Francisco Examiner. With her 2003 debut book "Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers," she unwittingly launched a bestselling series of hybrid humor/science books that includes "Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife" and "Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex. " Speaking via phone from her home in Oakland, she recounts her expectations for "Stiff": "I thought it was a one-off for sure.
NEWS
September 30, 1996 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is a tale of reading, writing and rejection. A few years ago, Fountain Valley grade school teacher Leigh Hoven-Severson decided to gather a few colleagues together and tackle a daunting task--writing a science textbook. After toiling on their own time, the teachers submitted their finished product--a series of books for kindergarten through fourth grade dubbed Exploring Science--to the state of California's science textbook selection committee.
NATIONAL
November 7, 2003 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
The State Board of Education, swayed by arguments that watering down the theory of evolution would "demean both faith and science," adopted a new slate of high school biology books Thursday that were expected to eventually land on the desks of millions of students in more than a dozen states. Technically, the board's 11-4 vote was preliminary, but it was seen as a forceful rebuke of religious conservatives seeking to have the books rejected.
OPINION
November 17, 2004
Re "Biology a Sticky Issue in Georgia," Nov. 13: As a strong believer (I use the word advisedly) in both evolution and the separation of church and state, I think a compromise is possible that would reconcile me with the position of those citizens who want government influence in religious matters. I consider as a fair quid pro quo that school boards affix stickers to all science books stating that evolution is "only a theory" as long as the same boards affix stickers to all Bibles stating that the story of Genesis "has not been supported by evidence."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2008 | Karen Kaplan, Karen Kaplan is a Times staff writer.
Science historian Dan Lewis opened the green cloth cover of "The Origin of Species," Charles Darwin's classic work on evolutionary biology, and flipped to Page 20. And there, in the 11th line of text, was the telltale typo: "Speceies." That misprint marked the book as one of the 1,250 copies originally published in London in 1859.
OPINION
November 17, 2004
Re "Biology a Sticky Issue in Georgia," Nov. 13: As a strong believer (I use the word advisedly) in both evolution and the separation of church and state, I think a compromise is possible that would reconcile me with the position of those citizens who want government influence in religious matters. I consider as a fair quid pro quo that school boards affix stickers to all science books stating that evolution is "only a theory" as long as the same boards affix stickers to all Bibles stating that the story of Genesis "has not been supported by evidence."
NATIONAL
November 7, 2003 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
The State Board of Education, swayed by arguments that watering down the theory of evolution would "demean both faith and science," adopted a new slate of high school biology books Thursday that were expected to eventually land on the desks of millions of students in more than a dozen states. Technically, the board's 11-4 vote was preliminary, but it was seen as a forceful rebuke of religious conservatives seeking to have the books rejected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Herman Schneider, 98, a writer best known for his science books for children, died July 31 in Boston. The cause of death was not reported. Collaborating frequently with his wife, Nina, Schneider wrote books including "How Big Is Big? From Stars to Atoms, a Yardstick for the Universe" and "Let's Look Under the City: Water, Gas, Waste, Electricity, Telephone." Among the works he wrote under his own name were "Everyday Machines and How They Work" and "Everyday Weather and How It Works."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cecil J. Nesbitt, 89, internationally recognized mathematician in actuary science, died Monday in Ann Arbor, Mich. Nesbitt, who taught mathematics at the University of Michigan for more than 40 years, published three books. The 1986 "Actuarial Mathematics" is considered the core textbook for actuarial studies. His first book, "Rings With Minimum Conditions," was written in 1944 and is still in use.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2000 | IRENE GARCIA
Griffin Frazen, an eighth-grader at Millikan Middle School, is only 13, but he's practically an expert on exotic creatures. He'll tell you that a dik dik is a small, crossbred deer with no antlers and that an angwantibo, similar to a lemur, is known for its large eyes and lives in the African forest. "The kiwi is one of my favorites," Griffin said. "It's a bird with no wings that lives mainly in Indonesia."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1992 | MARY ANNE PEREZ
County officials are looking for donations to help poorer students get a firsthand look at the mountains and geological wonders that they study in science classes. The Outdoor Science School and the Environmental Field Study, programs of the Orange County Department of Education, teach 17,000 fifth- and sixth-grade students a year about geology, forestry and other sciences in the San Bernardino Mountains.
NEWS
April 16, 1990 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Traditionally, the nonfiction marketplace was a black hole for science books. Simplistic self-help books, cooking guides and glitz-biographies regularly ascended to publishing superstardom. The egghead stuff disappeared into a cultural cosmic void. Then a gnomish University of Cambridge theoretical physicist wrote a book about the possible origins of the universe. This week, Stephen W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2000 | Associated Press
If today's students want to understand how scientists mapped the human genetic code, they won't get much help from their high school textbooks, a group of scientists and educators said recently. "Textbooks treat the topic piecemeal, leaving out the simple story or obscuring it with needless details," said George Nelson of the American Asn. for the Advancement of Science. The group leveled its harshest criticism yet of U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1999 | CATHERINE BLAKE
Mayor Ellen Hall presented the Ojai Library with a check for $20,000 this week to update its book collection. The money will be used to purchase more than 1,000 science books during the next six months. "It is more critical to replace old science books, because the information is changing daily, than it is to replace an old dictionary," said Kit Willis, library supervisor. The Ojai City Council voted earlier this year to contribute $40,000 to the Ojai Library.
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