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SCIENCE
April 10, 2010
Mini 'big bangs' created Physicists at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, said they had created 10 million mini "big bangs" in the first week of mega-power operations of the subterranean Large Hadron Collider. "It's all looking pretty good. We are getting a mass of data," spokesman James Gillies said of the experiments, in which tiny particles are smashed together at a fraction of a second under the speed of light. The collisions create simulations on a tiny scale of the Big Bang 13.7 billion years ago. By tracking how particles behave after colliding, researchers hope to unveil secrets such as what makes up dark matter, why matter gained mass, and whether there are more dimensions than the four already known.
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SCIENCE
April 10, 2010
Mini 'big bangs' created Physicists at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, said they had created 10 million mini "big bangs" in the first week of mega-power operations of the subterranean Large Hadron Collider. "It's all looking pretty good. We are getting a mass of data," spokesman James Gillies said of the experiments, in which tiny particles are smashed together at a fraction of a second under the speed of light. The collisions create simulations on a tiny scale of the Big Bang 13.7 billion years ago. By tracking how particles behave after colliding, researchers hope to unveil secrets such as what makes up dark matter, why matter gained mass, and whether there are more dimensions than the four already known.
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SCIENCE
January 30, 2010
Wolf population steady A new tally of gray wolves in the Northern Rockies shows the population held steady across the region in 2009, ending more than a decade of expansion by the predators but also underscoring their resilience in the face of new hunting seasons in Montana and Idaho. Biologists said the region's total wolf population will be similar to 2008's minimum of 1,650 wolves in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming. If the preliminary figures hold, it could bolster the federal government's assertion that wolves are doing fine since losing protections under the Endangered Species Act last year.
SCIENCE
January 30, 2010
Wolf population steady A new tally of gray wolves in the Northern Rockies shows the population held steady across the region in 2009, ending more than a decade of expansion by the predators but also underscoring their resilience in the face of new hunting seasons in Montana and Idaho. Biologists said the region's total wolf population will be similar to 2008's minimum of 1,650 wolves in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming. If the preliminary figures hold, it could bolster the federal government's assertion that wolves are doing fine since losing protections under the Endangered Species Act last year.
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