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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1993 | NONA YATES
Not all scientific activity takes place in dreary labs. Much of it is is carried on outdoors, and what better outdoor laboratory is there than Southern California? Several local organizations are offering outdoor science courses for youngsters this summer. Many will take advantage of local facilities, such as museums and science labs, and most incorporate hands-on activities for children.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
The politically touchy topic of climate change will be taught more deeply to students under proposed new national science standards released Tuesday. The Next Generation Science Standards, developed over the last 18 months by California and 25 other states in conjunction with several scientific organizations, represent the first national effort since 1996 to transform the way science is taught in thousands of classrooms. The multi-state consortium is proposing that students learn fewer concepts more deeply and not merely memorize facts but understand how scientists actually investigate and gather information.
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NEWS
March 6, 1986
A $1.5-million contract to build an eight-classroom science building at Norwalk High School was awarded Monday to Rainey Construction Inc. of La Habra by the Norwalk-La Mirada Unified School District board of trustees. The facility--which will eventually house four labs for biology, chemistry and physics--should be completed by late September or early October, a district spokesman said.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- A new nonprofit is launching a campaign to encourage American kids to code. Code.org has tapped some of the technology industry's leading luminaries - - Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Twitter and Square's Jack Dorsey and Microsoft's Bill Gates - - to lead the charge in a new video promoting the cool of coding. Code.org is working to make computer science classes available in more schools and create "the wizards of tomorrow. " It was started by Hadi and Ali Partovi, technology entrepreneurs and startup investor and advisors.
NATIONAL
October 11, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The state Board of Education approved public school curriculum guidelines Tuesday that support the teaching of evolution but not "intelligent design" in science classes. The concept of intelligent design can be taught in other classes, but it doesn't belong in science, according to the unanimously adopted guidelines. "The intent of the board needs to be very clear," said board member John Austin, an Ann Arbor Democrat. "Evolution is not under stress. It is not untested science."
NEWS
June 23, 1993 | ROBIN ABCARIAN
Today, in honor of the 21st anniversary of Title IX, the federal law that outlaws unequal treatment of males and females in public schools, a modest proposal. Elegant, inspired and delightfully old-fashioned, it comes from Susan Zucker, a math teacher at Gompers Middle School in South-Central Los Angeles. For a long time, Zucker has been aware of research showing that girls are shortchanged in the classroom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1989 | KIMBERLY L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
Seventh-graders at Rancho San Joaquin Intermediate School have been fascinated by life science instructor Bill W. Anderson's "teaching tools"--animals of all kinds, including a 15-foot python, caged cockateels, wild deer mice, exotic fish and more in two rooms used to expose his pupils to wildlife. But in one corner, next to a wall covered with clippings from science magazines, a glass aquarium marked "Haitian Boa" sits empty.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- A new nonprofit is launching a campaign to encourage American kids to code. Code.org has tapped some of the technology industry's leading luminaries - - Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Twitter and Square's Jack Dorsey and Microsoft's Bill Gates - - to lead the charge in a new video promoting the cool of coding. Code.org is working to make computer science classes available in more schools and create "the wizards of tomorrow. " It was started by Hadi and Ali Partovi, technology entrepreneurs and startup investor and advisors.
NEWS
November 26, 1992 | ELIZABETH LEVITAN SPAID, THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
The third-grader with the two front teeth missing wriggles his arms and head into what looks like a fancy white snowsuit that weighs about 50 pounds. He grins as a bubble-shaped helmet is placed over his head. "Why don't you say something to the class," suggests teacher Cameron Dryden. "Hello," he screams, but only a faint, muffled voice comes out. A room full of kids giggle and titter. "Do some space things. Jump around," Dryden says. The boy tries to move but can barely take a step.
OPINION
May 20, 2012 | By John M. Ellis and Charles L. Geshekter
Political advocacy corrupts academic institutions. Why? Because the mind-set of a genuine academic teacher is in every important respect the opposite of a political activist's. Academic teachers want to promote independent thought and analytical skills; political activists want conformity. The one fosters intellectual curiosity and encourages opposing viewpoints; the latter seeks to shut it down. This vital distinction is well understood. In California, the state Constitution contains this unambiguous statement: "The university shall be entirely independent of all political or sectarian influence and kept free therefrom.
OPINION
December 27, 2012
There's a lot of fiction being spread about the new requirements to expand the reading of nonfiction in public schools. Some teachers say they have already been forced to cut important poetry and literature from their classes to make way for government reports and lists of invasive plants. To some extent, the complaints appear overblown. Contrary to what some news outlets have reported, no one is proposing to dump "Macbeth" for pamphlets about insulation. Nor is the proposal as ridiculous as some suggest; the planned changes could valuably broaden students' reading, writing and thinking skills.
OPINION
June 7, 2012
It's one thing to give school districts more authority over their budgets so they can bring students to the highest possible levels of educational attainment, as Gov. Jerry Brown wisely proposes in his budget plan. But Brown also, unacceptably, would include in that authority the freedom to lower educational standards by scaling back science requirements in high school. Lifting the state requirement that students take a second year of science in order to graduate would free Sacramento from its obligation to cover the cost for that second year, which amounts to about $250 million a year.
OPINION
May 20, 2012 | By John M. Ellis and Charles L. Geshekter
Political advocacy corrupts academic institutions. Why? Because the mind-set of a genuine academic teacher is in every important respect the opposite of a political activist's. Academic teachers want to promote independent thought and analytical skills; political activists want conformity. The one fosters intellectual curiosity and encourages opposing viewpoints; the latter seeks to shut it down. This vital distinction is well understood. In California, the state Constitution contains this unambiguous statement: "The university shall be entirely independent of all political or sectarian influence and kept free therefrom.
OPINION
March 15, 2008
Re "Teach climate change," Opinion, March 9 The teaching of climate change, or global warming, along with other scientifically accepted but socially divisive topics, is long overdue. Climate change or evolution would not be controversial subjects if people understood the science. As a culture, we have allowed people with no training or understanding of certain subjects to dictate what is to be taught in schools. Many people get their knowledge of science from talk radio, where hosts often have their own differing reasons for imparting bad information.
NATIONAL
October 11, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The state Board of Education approved public school curriculum guidelines Tuesday that support the teaching of evolution but not "intelligent design" in science classes. The concept of intelligent design can be taught in other classes, but it doesn't belong in science, according to the unanimously adopted guidelines. "The intent of the board needs to be very clear," said board member John Austin, an Ann Arbor Democrat. "Evolution is not under stress. It is not untested science."
HOME & GARDEN
September 14, 2006
THANK you for the lovely article and photos about the Silver Lake home of Anais Nin and Rupert Pole ["Storied Past, Uncertain Future," Sept. 7]. They brought back memories from 1974 when I was a starving, 22-year-old student in Paris. That spring, Anais gave a reading at Shakespeare & Co. I was so overwhelmed by her aura that I sat in the back of the bookstore all evening as she read and signed books, never daring to approach her. When she and Rupert finally left -- around 10 p.m. -- I raced out of the bookstore and up the sidewalk in front of Notre Dame, where I timidly introduced myself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1995 | MIMI KO
Latoya Boatley wants to become a nurse who works with patients and their lawyers in malpractice cases. The 14-year-old Anaheim High School student didn't know nurses could do that until Thursday. That's when she and about 800 other junior high and high school students--mostly girls--from throughout North County attended the 11th annual "Bridges to Tomorrow Careers in Mathematics and Science" conference at Fullerton College.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1989
The Times editorial "On Teaching Science" (Jan. 9) correctly observed, I believe, that "only science should be taught in science classes." But concerning evolution vs. scientific creationism the question, I believe, is: Should either view be taught in science classes? The posture creationists take only tends to cloud the real issue. The thought that the universe is only a few thousand years old and that the rest of creation was accomplished in six days is not only scientifically preposterous, but biblically inaccurate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2006 | Roy Rivenburg, Times Staff Writer
Could an overdose of gamma rays really transform someone into the Incredible Hulk? Was Superman defying Einstein's theory of relativity when he flew faster than the speed of light? While other UC Irvine science classes dissect sharks or explore plasma physics, Professor Michael Dennin's seminar analyzes comic book superpowers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2004 | Kimi Yoshino, Times Staff Writer
There's a greyhound's heart, a cat's spinal cord, a smoker's lung. A human female torso and head sliced into 1-inch sections from head to waist, completely preserved -- all touchable, teachable. The Plastination Lab is one of Orange Coast College's more interesting places. On a recent tour, a group of high school students had the chance to touch the human torso -- which Ann Harmer, an anatomy professor, calls "Bernadette" -- and check out a baby dolphin being prepared for plastination.
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