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OPINION
January 3, 2010 | By Irving R. Epstein
At most universities, freshman chemistry, a class I've taught for nearly 40 years, is the first course students take on the road to a career in the health professions or the biological or physical sciences. It's a tough course, and for many students it's the obstacle that keeps them from majoring in science. This is particularly true for minority students. In 2005, more than two-thirds of the American scientific workforce was composed of white males. But by 2050, white males will make up less than one-fourth of the population.
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OPINION
April 24, 2014
Re "Are we losing the tech race?," Opinion, April 20 Michael Teitelbaum presents common-sense advice about majoring in science. He echoes what proponents of the liberal arts have been saying for years: that it is not enough to specialize in one area of expertise, and that science students must gain broad intellectual skills developed through the humanities, arts and social sciences. However, I disagree with Teitelbaum's assessment that science education for non-science majors should be limited to K-12.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1994
Re "Public Schools Can't Deliver Science Education Alone," editorial, July 5: You call justifiably for more science in American school education. The issue is surely partly as you state it: Incentives are needed for those in academic science to teach in the school system. There are, however, very powerful disincentives of another sort that stem from the school system's inability to establish a teaching environment where scientists have the freedom to teach the basics underlying these disciplines, unencumbered by religious advocacy.
OPINION
August 7, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Americans love the fruits of science, but the rigors it takes to grow them - that's another matter. A full-court press for more STEM - science, technology, engineering and math - students and teachers is still coming up short. Since 1969, the groundbreaking Exploratorium in San Francisco has made a highly successful case for hands-on science learning. Its new $300-million bayside quarters opened a few months ago, and its executive director (and resident STEM education expert), Dennis Bartels, is experimenter-in-chief, charged with making science teachable, visible, accessible and gee-whiz fun. We're 50 years from the thick of the space race, when America put a premium on science education.
NEWS
January 30, 1987 | From the Washington Post
The National Science Foundation on Thursday announced a $50-million program to greatly expand and upgrade science education for elementary schoolchildren over the next four years, sponsoring the first large-scale development of science curriculum since the post-Sputnik era three decades ago. Citing the need to recover the nation's competitive position in the world, the federal agency hopes to establish science as a basic course for students as early as kindergarten.
NEWS
August 30, 1992
Caltech has received a five-year, $2-million grant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute of Bethesda, Md., for pre-college and undergraduate science education. Areas that will receive money from the grant include the Summer Undergraduate and Minority Undergraduate research fellowships. Pre-college and outreach programs include a summer science institute for college-bound 11th-graders and a science training course for elementary school teachers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1994 | RUSS LOAR
Chapman University has received a $300,000 grant from the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation, which in turn will prompt the release of funds from a $150,000 challenge grant awarded in 1991 by the James Irvine Foundation. The grants will be used primarily for undergraduate science education. The university also recently received a $100,000 grant from an anonymous donor for science education.
NEWS
March 27, 1992 | MARILYN YAQUINTO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American students are learning the fundamentals of science but they are not developing the sophisticated skills needed to analyze or integrate scientific information, according to a major study released Thursday by the Department of Education. Education Secretary Lamar Alexander said that the failure of the educational system to rise above basic science education is undermining the nation's ability to compete in a high-tech world that is increasingly dependent on strong math and science skills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1994
Prospects for better science teaching in American public schools have been markedly improved by proposed new national standards for science education. But the standards mean little without a commitment from local school districts, universities and businesses to provide the resources, leadership and staffs to reverse a deterioration in American scientific literacy that threatens the nation's economic future. The issue here is not producing more scientists and engineers; they are in surplus now.
OPINION
July 13, 2013
Re "More lab time for youths?," July 10, and "Delay on science standards," July 11 Augmenting time in the lab at the expense of understanding the fundamental concepts of basic scientific disciplines, as proposed in the Next Generation Science Standards, is almost certainly another ineffective ploy to divert attention from the failure of our public schools to provide a viable scientific education to young people. To teach "climate change" without a rudimentary understanding of thermodynamics, and "genetic engineering" without a fundamental understanding of genetics, is social science sophistry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
State Board of Education officials delayed a decision Wednesday on adopting new science standards that would tackle fewer subjects more deeply and favor hands-on experiments over rote memorization of facts. The board decided to take up the issue again in the fall, after educators return from summer break and can weigh in on the proposed standards. But board members - along with 21 speakers from academia, business and community advocacy groups who attended the meeting - expressed support for the proposed benchmarks, saying they would make science more exciting for students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
State Board of Education officials delayed a decision Wednesday on adopting new science standards that would tackle fewer subjects more deeply and favor hands-on experiments over rote memorization of facts.  The board decided to take up the issue again in the fall, after educators return from summer break and can weigh in on the proposed standards. But board members -- along with 21 speakers from academia, business and community advocacy groups who attended the meeting -- expressed support for the proposed benchmarks, saying they would make science more exciting for students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
California schoolchildren would study fewer concepts more deeply and emphasize hands-on investigation over rote memorization of facts under new science standards set for consideration Wednesday by the state Board of Education. The proposed benchmarks are based on the Next Generation Science Standards, which were unveiled in April by California and 25 others states in the first national effort since 1996 to transform the way science is taught. The standards delve more thoroughly into such often controversial topics as climate change and the impact of genetic engineering on food and medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
The politically touchy topic of climate change will be taught more deeply to students under proposed new national science standards released Tuesday. The Next Generation Science Standards, developed over the last 18 months by California and 25 other states in conjunction with several scientific organizations, represent the first national effort since 1996 to transform the way science is taught in thousands of classrooms. The multi-state consortium is proposing that students learn fewer concepts more deeply and not merely memorize facts but understand how scientists actually investigate and gather information.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
The politically touchy topic of climate change will be taught more deeply to students under proposed new national science standards released Tuesday. The Next Generation Science Standards, developed over the last year by California and 25 other states in conjunction with several national scientific organizations, represent the first effort in some 15 years to transform the way science is taught in million of classrooms. The multi-state consortium is proposing that students learn fewer standards more deeply and not merely memorize information but understand how scientists actually investigated and gathered it.  “What's important here is that the standards will give students a deep understanding of how science and scientists actually work,” said Phil Lafontaine, a California Department of Education official who has helped spearhead the development of the new standards.
OPINION
February 20, 2013 | Patt Morrison
When artist Dan Goods arrived at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, they gave him a six-month shot. In May, he'll have been there 10 years as JPL's "visual strategist. " He glued soda bottles to the roof of his Taurus to create music on an m.p.h. pipe organ. At JPL, his "Out There" sign (recycled computer-box parts) conjures the infinite in a meeting space and plaster hands he installed in the library hold curious objects. He once drilled a hole through a grain of sand to demonstrate the size of our galaxy, and then put that grain of sand in six rooms of sand that represent the universe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2012 | Steve Lopez
Los Angeles Unified School District biology teacher Tom Phillips is retiring this month, but on his way out, he's decided to go public with a pet peeve. Phillips believes the continued Christian fundamentalist effort to debunk evolution is undermining science education in the United States, and he has seen evidence of that with his own students at Harbor Teacher Preparation Academy in Wilmington. "Large numbers of Christian Evangelicals have flocked to this school because of its strong academics and have turned it into a publicly supported religious institution," Phillips, 64, said in an email that began several weeks of correspondence between us. The evolution vs. creationism debate has a long history, dating back to the 1925 Scopes monkey trial in Tennessee.
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