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Science Fairs

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1993 | PATRICK McCARTNEY
More than 600 student scientists have asked to participate in the Ventura County Science Fair Thursday, but event officials say they need a few more adult volunteers to complete preparations for this year's fair. The students' exhibits will be on display from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Ventura County Fairgrounds, and up to 10 more volunteers are needed to watch over the displays, said Deborah Ourvan of the organizing committee.
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SCIENCE
March 12, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
A project that could point the way to a new class of drugs to treat influenza won the top prize Tuesday night at the Intel Science Talent Search, netting 17-year-old Eric S. Chen a cool $100,000. Chen, a senior at Canyon Crest Academy in San Diego, combined chemistry, biology and computer modeling to find compounds capable of blocking an enzyme called endonuclease, which the flu virus needs to spread. Despite taking home the grand prize at the 2013 Google Science Fair and the top individual honor at the 2013 Siemens Competition in Math, Science and Technology , Chen said he didn't expect to come in first at the Intel competition . “I had no idea I was going to win,” Chen told his hometown newspaper, the San Diego Union-Tribune, after the awards were announced in Washington, D.C. “If I had placed between fifth and 10th, I would have been incredibly happy.” Chen has worked in the lab of Rommie Amaro , an assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry at UC San Diego, since the summer of 2012.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1990 | TONY MARCANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bitter contract battle between the Ocean View School District and its teachers' union has jeopardized science fairs in six of the district's schools and could cost pupils a chance to participate in prestigious county and state fairs, officials on both sides of the negotiations said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2012 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
The rows of experiments at the Los Angeles County Science Fair began with a simple question: Is a dog's mouth cleaner than a human's? Answer: It isn't. How about this: Is the closest living relative of the Tyrannosaurus rex a chicken? Not quite. It's the red junglefowl, a wild chicken. Or: Could a sixth-grader build a hovercraft? He could, capable of carrying both him and his mother. But he couldn't figure out how to propel his creation. "I read that some fire extinguishers would work," he wrote, "but my parents wouldn't let me try. " These results and many others were presented by more than 1,000 young scientists whose work for the 62nd annual science fair was on display at the Pasadena Convention Center on Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1997 | COLL METCALFE
For Breanne Henkelman, winning the overall, first-place prize at Mesa Union School's science fair was just a bonus. Learning was the real reward. Breanne, 13, who has been competing in science fairs since she was in kindergarten, spent the past few months studying the links between global warming and deforestation. She said it was her most ambitious project yet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1998 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whether she is doing science research, practicing ballet or perfecting flamenco steps, Marin McDonald excels. The 17-year-old Villa Park High senior who has won numerous awards recently was named California Science Student of the Year at the state science fair. McDonald spent much of the last two years refining her winning project, which studied people's damaging effects on a type of seaweed that plays an important role in protecting ocean wildlife.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1990 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Liu, one of more than 580 competitors in the annual California State Science Fair for high school students, exuded confidence Thursday as a judge approached his display in Exposition Park's Armory Building. Dressed in a double-breasted suit, white shirt and red "power tie" adorned with a gold tie chain, Liu looked more like a natty corporate executive than a 16-year-old high school student from Riverside.
NEWS
January 13, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Generally, these haven't been good times for science fairs -- budget cuts at schools and tough family finances have meant that fewer kids get the opportunity to hypothesize, test and conclude; to beg their mom to neatly stencil their work onto a large poster display (at the last minute, for maximum dramatic effect); and, if they're lucky, to win a ribbon or trophy for their (her?) work. But this year, budding scientists around the world will get a chance to submit science projects electronically to Google's online science fair , set to take place in May. The company called for entries on Tuesday, and will accept submissions until April 4.  Kids interested in the health sciences can submit projects in biology, food science or several other applicable categories.
NEWS
August 12, 1994 | Associated Press
Love them or hate them, we've all been through our share of science fairs, with everything from erupting volcanoes to pumping plastic hearts. But how much science is in a science fair? F. James Rutherford, director of Project 2061 for the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science, said students get "engrossed, putting together the elements of a contest. . . . But many times when you look at what the kids actually do, you realize that somehow or other the science gets lost."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1996 | SARAH KLEIN
Todd Sarkaria spent 100 hours preparing his exhibit on blood circulation for the Orange County Science and Engineering Fair, so the 14-year-old could appreciate the work of his competitors. The Villa Park High School freshman listened attentively as Nicole Salem from St. Irenaeus Elementary School in Cypress explained the effects of laser and scalpel surgery on the body.
SCIENCE
May 14, 2011 | Amina Khan
It was a passion for surfing that helped lead Adrienne McColl to the final round of the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Los Angeles this week. The 18-year-old senior at the San Pedro High School Marine Science Magnet had to put away her surfboard after fracturing her back twice during her sophomore year. To stay close to the water, she began investigating ways to restore the falling population of California spiny lobsters, focusing her efforts on keeping lobster larvae alive long enough to have a decent shot at reaching adulthood.
NEWS
January 13, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Generally, these haven't been good times for science fairs -- budget cuts at schools and tough family finances have meant that fewer kids get the opportunity to hypothesize, test and conclude; to beg their mom to neatly stencil their work onto a large poster display (at the last minute, for maximum dramatic effect); and, if they're lucky, to win a ribbon or trophy for their (her?) work. But this year, budding scientists around the world will get a chance to submit science projects electronically to Google's online science fair , set to take place in May. The company called for entries on Tuesday, and will accept submissions until April 4.  Kids interested in the health sciences can submit projects in biology, food science or several other applicable categories.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2009 | By Amina Khan
The 200 judges at the biomedical science fair surveyed the exhibits, pursing their lips. They clutched their clipboards, rating the effectiveness of presentations on topics from DNA extraction to magnetic accelerators. It was a tough crowd -- the judges were fourth-graders from Foster and Carver elementary schools in Compton, and the contestants were professors and researchers from Cal State L.A., Charles Drew and Loma Linda universities. The judges were chaperoned by juniors from the King/Drew Medical Magnet High School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2009 | Catherine Ho
Brian Vallelunga got two job offers yesterday. He's 14. His secret? Levitation. The Dana Middle School eighth-grader, one of more than 1,000 students participating in the 59th annual Los Angeles County Science Fair, impressed the judges so much with his research on ionic propulsion that two of them offered him summer internships. While Brian leveraged his talent into job prospects -- a growing rarity in today's economic climate -- the science fair has not escaped the sting of the recession.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2006 | Lynn Doan, Times Staff Writer
At school, sophomore Daisy Hernandez worries about getting through classes without being drawn into the racial brawls that have recently plagued Fremont High School. On Friday, she was more concerned about whether her science project on insecticides would place in the Los Angeles County Science Fair. "While they're fighting, I'm studying," said Daisy, who hopes to become a pediatrician. "To me, science is involved in everything I do in daily life."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2005 | Erica Williams, Times Staff Writer
What do you get when you mix a curious 13-year-old who's a car buff, a mom with a strong desire for a hybrid car and the 55th annual Los Angeles County Science Fair? You get Robert McRae, whose solar-powered go-cart was the talk of the fair this year. His design won second place in the junior division engineering category Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2001
Whether it's discovering if slug slime makes a good sealant or what soil is best for growing plants, science projects can teach us how to conduct experiments and discover new information about our world. We learn by conducting our own research. The process of creating a science project requires such specific steps as observation, hypothesis, analysis and conclusion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1996 | NICK GREEN
Volunteers are needed to help out at the 1996 Ventura County Science Fair, which will have 840 budding Einsteins and Salks vying for recognition in seven categories. Volunteers are needed to help set up and take down 810 individual and team entries. Judges are also needed, particularly in medical science and botany. Judges will spend Wednesday examining projects, interviewing participants in grades 6 through 12 and selecting winners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2004 | Joy Buchanan, Times Staff Writer
Swati Yanamadala, an eighth-grader from Palos Verdes, stood by her science fair project looking sharp in a black suit with a pink shirt, stud earrings and lip gloss. The 13-year-old sounded even sharper as she discussed her research on the Ballona Wetlands. Her work earned her one of the top two prizes in the Los Angeles County Science Fair on Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Thousand Oaks students who participate in the county science fair later this month will get a second chance to win recognition. Baxter BioScience of Westlake is hosting the first Baxter Science Fair to showcase the top science projects from the Conejo Valley Unified School District as part of next month's Conejo Valley Days. Special awards and $1,000 in prizes will be given out in 10 categories.
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