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NEWS
May 1, 1991 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite deepening social problems and the budget deficit, the federal government needs to double science spending over the next five years by all U.S. agencies that depend on scientific research, the president of the National Academy of Sciences urged Tuesday. In his annual speech to the prestigious 128-year-old organization, Frank Press argued that science should not be viewed as competing with social problems for federal funds.
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NEWS
January 30, 1998 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Putting the width of the country between himself and the furor that has enveloped the White House, Vice President Al Gore delved Thursday into his signature high-tech agenda and said the Clinton administration was proposing a $31-billion increase--the largest ever--in funding for three key federal science agencies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1988
Scientists believe a $400-million investment might let them harness antimatter and start developing lighter, faster spacecraft and better ways to diagnose disease, the RAND Corp. said Monday. "We are on the threshold of important advances in the basic science of antimatter and its practical applications. But as tantalizingly near as that may be, the rewards cannot be realized without a program such as we are advocating," said Bruno Augenstein, a physicist at the Santa Monica think tank.
NEWS
June 5, 1991 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the past 17 years, the federal government has spent $1.5 billion to finance construction of a huge telescope in space in order to provide scientists with unprecedentedly clear photos. Last year, it was launched--only to contain a badly flawed mirror. The superconducting super collider, an $11-billion project that would allow physicists to study the fundamental building blocks of the universe, is in danger of going broke for lack of contributions from international partners.
NEWS
November 24, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Academic medical researchers are mounting an aggressive campaign against a set of proposed federal conflict-of-interest rules that they say would significantly delay the development of drugs and impede progress in critical scientific research. The draft regulations were inspired by disclosures that some researchers had received federal grants to test products in which they had financial interests. Their dual role raised questions about their ability to perform their work objectively.
NEWS
January 30, 1998 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Putting the width of the country between himself and the furor that has enveloped the White House, Vice President Al Gore delved Thursday into his signature high-tech agenda and said the Clinton administration was proposing a $31-billion increase--the largest ever--in funding for three key federal science agencies.
NEWS
June 5, 1991 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the past 17 years, the federal government has spent $1.5 billion to finance construction of a huge telescope in space in order to provide scientists with unprecedentedly clear photos. Last year, it was launched--only to contain a badly flawed mirror. The superconducting super collider, an $11-billion project that would allow physicists to study the fundamental building blocks of the universe, is in danger of going broke for lack of contributions from international partners.
NEWS
May 10, 1991 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government's multibillion-dollar, superconducting super collider is facing sharply rising costs and potentially serious delays, prompting even erstwhile supporters to question the worthiness of the massive research project. And when the smoke finally cleared Thursday after five hours of hearings on the massive particle accelerator project, it was clear that all "big science" programs will face intense and bipartisan scrutiny from increasingly skeptical members of Congress.
NEWS
May 10, 1991 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government's multibillion-dollar, superconducting super collider is facing sharply rising costs and potentially serious delays, prompting even erstwhile supporters to question the worthiness of the massive research project. And when the smoke finally cleared Thursday after five hours of hearings on the massive particle accelerator project, it was clear that all "big science" programs will face intense and bipartisan scrutiny from increasingly skeptical members of Congress.
NEWS
May 1, 1991 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite deepening social problems and the budget deficit, the federal government needs to double science spending over the next five years by all U.S. agencies that depend on scientific research, the president of the National Academy of Sciences urged Tuesday. In his annual speech to the prestigious 128-year-old organization, Frank Press argued that science should not be viewed as competing with social problems for federal funds.
NEWS
November 24, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Academic medical researchers are mounting an aggressive campaign against a set of proposed federal conflict-of-interest rules that they say would significantly delay the development of drugs and impede progress in critical scientific research. The draft regulations were inspired by disclosures that some researchers had received federal grants to test products in which they had financial interests. Their dual role raised questions about their ability to perform their work objectively.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1988
Scientists believe a $400-million investment might let them harness antimatter and start developing lighter, faster spacecraft and better ways to diagnose disease, the RAND Corp. said Monday. "We are on the threshold of important advances in the basic science of antimatter and its practical applications. But as tantalizingly near as that may be, the rewards cannot be realized without a program such as we are advocating," said Bruno Augenstein, a physicist at the Santa Monica think tank.
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