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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A study of accident victims in California found that those with preexisting medical problems are at a much greater risk of dying from even moderate injuries, researchers said last week. Patients with one or more previous medical conditions, including blood clotting, heart disease, cirrhosis of the liver and diabetes, had a 30% higher mortality rate than those without any illnesses.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2007 | Adam Bernstein, Washington Post
Earl Ubell, a journalist who covered the leading health and science breakthroughs of the postwar age with a lively and effective style, died Wednesday at a nursing facility in Englewood, N.J. He was 80 and had Parkinson's disease and dementia. Ubell, who had a physics degree, first came to prominence as science editor at the New York Herald Tribune from 1953 until the paper folded in 1966. His columns regularly appeared in the Los Angeles Times from 1959 until 1966.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2007 | Adam Bernstein, Washington Post
Earl Ubell, a journalist who covered the leading health and science breakthroughs of the postwar age with a lively and effective style, died Wednesday at a nursing facility in Englewood, N.J. He was 80 and had Parkinson's disease and dementia. Ubell, who had a physics degree, first came to prominence as science editor at the New York Herald Tribune from 1953 until the paper folded in 1966. His columns regularly appeared in the Los Angeles Times from 1959 until 1966.
NEWS
November 8, 2001 | AARON ZITNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Institutes of Health on Wednesday said they had begun accepting applications from scientists who want federal money to study human embryonic stem cells, a controversial type of research that prompted an intense national debate last summer. The announcement had been eagerly awaited among scientists who hope stem cells will lead to new cures for disease and a better understanding of embryo development.
NEWS
November 8, 2001 | AARON ZITNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Institutes of Health on Wednesday said they had begun accepting applications from scientists who want federal money to study human embryonic stem cells, a controversial type of research that prompted an intense national debate last summer. The announcement had been eagerly awaited among scientists who hope stem cells will lead to new cures for disease and a better understanding of embryo development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1990 | MELVIN KONNER, M.D., Konner teaches medical anthropology at Emory University. His column appears in the Science/Medicine pages every other week. and
Dear Nicotine Pushers, We health fanatics gave a cheer when Dr. Louis W. Sullivan, the new secretary of Health and Human Services, shot down R. J. Reynolds' naked attempt to target black neighborhoods with a new cigarette aimed just at them. Little did we know the same company was waiting in the wings with an even more insidious bid for tainted profits. According to a report in the Washington Post in mid-February, you folks at R. J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1997 | MICHELLE LOCKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Exercise and health researcher Paul Williams wants 55,000 people to take a walk--a lot of walks--and then report back on how they're feeling. Along the way he hopes to find answers to the couch potato's conundrum: Is there gain without pain? "We want to answer the question, 'Does walking give the same benefits as running, or do you need to walk more to get the same benefits, or faster to get the same benefits?' People need to have some very scientific answers," Williams said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A panel of scientists has concluded from a review of existing scientific studies that malathion can cause increased chromosomal damage in laboratory cell cultures, animals and possibly humans. But it said there is insufficient data to determine the significance of the genetic damage, especially whether it would result in birth defects or cancer.
NEWS
November 28, 1993 | IRA DREYFUSS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Carol C. Spelman was a spy for science. She wanted to know whether walkers did what exercise experts counted on them to do--walk at a pace associated with health benefits. So she watched them, covertly. Spelman sought to nail down a key detail in exercise studies. Researchers had already estimated from laboratory work how hard a person must walk to achieve metabolic changes associated with better health. The question was whether people outside a lab normally did it.
NEWS
February 16, 1997 | ERICH SMITH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The best way to reduce water pollution may not be by targeting factories and sewage plants, some scientists believe, but by planting trees along the banks of small streams. If the theory becomes public policy, it could dramatically change landscapes where trees have been cleared away for hundreds of years.
BOOKS
August 22, 1999 | MARTIN GARDNER, Martin Gardner is the author of numerous books, including "The Healing Revelations of Mary Baker Eddy." His most recent book, "Visitors From Oz," is a fantasy about the adventures of Dorothy, Scarecrow and Tin Woodman in the United States
From the jacket and frontispiece of Gillian Gill's massive, impeccably researched biography, a haunting photo of Mary Baker Eddy, taken when she was a young widow, stares at you. Her gaunt face, especially her enormous eyes, seem tinged with suffering, perhaps also with madness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1997 | MICHELLE LOCKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Exercise and health researcher Paul Williams wants 55,000 people to take a walk--a lot of walks--and then report back on how they're feeling. Along the way he hopes to find answers to the couch potato's conundrum: Is there gain without pain? "We want to answer the question, 'Does walking give the same benefits as running, or do you need to walk more to get the same benefits, or faster to get the same benefits?' People need to have some very scientific answers," Williams said.
NEWS
February 16, 1997 | ERICH SMITH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The best way to reduce water pollution may not be by targeting factories and sewage plants, some scientists believe, but by planting trees along the banks of small streams. If the theory becomes public policy, it could dramatically change landscapes where trees have been cleared away for hundreds of years.
NEWS
November 28, 1993 | IRA DREYFUSS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Carol C. Spelman was a spy for science. She wanted to know whether walkers did what exercise experts counted on them to do--walk at a pace associated with health benefits. So she watched them, covertly. Spelman sought to nail down a key detail in exercise studies. Researchers had already estimated from laboratory work how hard a person must walk to achieve metabolic changes associated with better health. The question was whether people outside a lab normally did it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A study of accident victims in California found that those with preexisting medical problems are at a much greater risk of dying from even moderate injuries, researchers said last week. Patients with one or more previous medical conditions, including blood clotting, heart disease, cirrhosis of the liver and diabetes, had a 30% higher mortality rate than those without any illnesses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1990 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A panel of scientists has concluded from a review of existing scientific studies that malathion can cause increased chromosomal damage in laboratory cell cultures, animals and possibly humans. But it said there is insufficient data to determine the significance of the genetic damage, especially whether it would result in birth defects or cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1990 | MELVIN KONNER, M.D., Konner teaches medical anthropology at Emory University. His column appears in the Science/Medicine pages every other week. and
Dear Nicotine Pushers, We health fanatics gave a cheer when Dr. Louis W. Sullivan, the new secretary of Health and Human Services, shot down R. J. Reynolds' naked attempt to target black neighborhoods with a new cigarette aimed just at them. Little did we know the same company was waiting in the wings with an even more insidious bid for tainted profits. According to a report in the Washington Post in mid-February, you folks at R. J.
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