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NEWS
July 15, 1988 | LEE DEMBART
Coming of Age in the Milky Way by Timothy Ferris (William Morrow and Co.: $19.95; 495 pages) The history and development of science is civilization's best story. Starting with the ancient Greeks more than 2,500 years ago, it is the saga of humanity's use of its intelligence to understand the world and the universe around us.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013
SCIENCE The Cancer Chronicles Unlocking Medicine's Deepest Mystery George Johnson Knopf, $27.95 After his wife was diagnosed with a metastatic cancer, New York Times science writer Johnson embarked on an intense and comprehensive exploration of the history - and future - of cancer. (August) A Short History of Nuclear Folly Mad Scientists, Dithering Nazis, Lost Nukes, and Catastrophic Cover-Ups Rudolph Herzog Melville House, $26 The author and son of filmmaker Werner Herzog presents a sardonic, little-known history of misguided, accidental and irresponsible uses of nuclear technology.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1998 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a cemetery in this city with epitaphs such as "In loving memory of the nuttiest man who ever lived" for peanut researcher George Washington Carver, and "He went out with a bang" for Alfred B. Nobel, the inventor of dynamite. It's not as disrespectful as it sounds. These faux tombstones belong to the Scientists Cemetery at Arcadia High School, a research project mixing science with some ghoulish fun.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2006 | Lynne Heffley
Masks and marionettes, textiles and ceramics from Africa, Asia and the Pacific at the UCLA Fowler Museum. Yosemite, through the eyes of Native American weavers, landscape artists and photographers at the Autry National Center's Museum of the American West. A legacy of ancient embroidery techniques as a visual narrative of Palestinian history at the Craft and Folk Art Museum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1998 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't easy jockeying the wheelchair into place under the keyboard of the baby grand piano. The chair arms were a little high and the footrests kept getting hung up on the pedals, but after a few moments everything was set and Arnold O. Beckman began to play. They were old songs. Timeless songs. "Yankee Doodle." "Jingle Bells." Ditties, really. But each note spun the engine of time in reverse until Beckman, age 98, was a young man again.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013
SCIENCE The Cancer Chronicles Unlocking Medicine's Deepest Mystery George Johnson Knopf, $27.95 After his wife was diagnosed with a metastatic cancer, New York Times science writer Johnson embarked on an intense and comprehensive exploration of the history - and future - of cancer. (August) A Short History of Nuclear Folly Mad Scientists, Dithering Nazis, Lost Nukes, and Catastrophic Cover-Ups Rudolph Herzog Melville House, $26 The author and son of filmmaker Werner Herzog presents a sardonic, little-known history of misguided, accidental and irresponsible uses of nuclear technology.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2005 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Nahum Sarna, a scholar, author and educator whose book "Understanding Genesis" (1966) established him as a biblical authority who was also able to make academic research accessible to nonexperts, has died. He was 82. Sarna, a professor emeritus at Brandeis University, died June 23 at his home in Boca Raton, Fla., after a long illness, according to David Nathan, a Brandeis spokesman.
NEWS
January 13, 1999 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Sixty Minutes" commentator Andy Rooney and historian Doris Kearns Goodwin are among the headliners of the upcoming second annual Distinguished Speakers Lecture Series at the Newport Beach Central Library. The four-part Friday evening series begins at 7 p.m. Feb. 19 with David Levy, co-discoverer of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet and 20 other comets.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2006 | Lynne Heffley
Masks and marionettes, textiles and ceramics from Africa, Asia and the Pacific at the UCLA Fowler Museum. Yosemite, through the eyes of Native American weavers, landscape artists and photographers at the Autry National Center's Museum of the American West. A legacy of ancient embroidery techniques as a visual narrative of Palestinian history at the Craft and Folk Art Museum.
NEWS
July 17, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Robert D. Ballard headed up the discovery of two fabled sunken ships, the Titanic in 1985 and, just last month, the World War II German battleship Bismarck. In both cases, poignant reminders of human frailty persist on the dark, cold ocean floor, he says, lingering testaments to the dead, dragged far beyond air and light by plummeting hulks of steel and iron. Shoes. Pairs and pairs of shoes resting on the sea floor as if their owners had just stepped out of them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2005 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Nahum Sarna, a scholar, author and educator whose book "Understanding Genesis" (1966) established him as a biblical authority who was also able to make academic research accessible to nonexperts, has died. He was 82. Sarna, a professor emeritus at Brandeis University, died June 23 at his home in Boca Raton, Fla., after a long illness, according to David Nathan, a Brandeis spokesman.
SCIENCE
March 30, 2005 | John Johnson, Times Staff Writer
In a sunlit gallery of the Museo Archeologico Nazionale in Italy, astronomer Brad Schaefer came face to face with an ancient statue known as the Farnese Atlas. For centuries, the 7-foot marble figure of the mythological Atlas has bent in stoic agony with a sphere of the cosmos crushing his shoulders.
NEWS
January 13, 1999 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Sixty Minutes" commentator Andy Rooney and historian Doris Kearns Goodwin are among the headliners of the upcoming second annual Distinguished Speakers Lecture Series at the Newport Beach Central Library. The four-part Friday evening series begins at 7 p.m. Feb. 19 with David Levy, co-discoverer of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet and 20 other comets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1998 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a cemetery in this city with epitaphs such as "In loving memory of the nuttiest man who ever lived" for peanut researcher George Washington Carver, and "He went out with a bang" for Alfred B. Nobel, the inventor of dynamite. It's not as disrespectful as it sounds. These faux tombstones belong to the Scientists Cemetery at Arcadia High School, a research project mixing science with some ghoulish fun.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1998 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't easy jockeying the wheelchair into place under the keyboard of the baby grand piano. The chair arms were a little high and the footrests kept getting hung up on the pedals, but after a few moments everything was set and Arnold O. Beckman began to play. They were old songs. Timeless songs. "Yankee Doodle." "Jingle Bells." Ditties, really. But each note spun the engine of time in reverse until Beckman, age 98, was a young man again.
NEWS
July 17, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Robert D. Ballard headed up the discovery of two fabled sunken ships, the Titanic in 1985 and, just last month, the World War II German battleship Bismarck. In both cases, poignant reminders of human frailty persist on the dark, cold ocean floor, he says, lingering testaments to the dead, dragged far beyond air and light by plummeting hulks of steel and iron. Shoes. Pairs and pairs of shoes resting on the sea floor as if their owners had just stepped out of them.
SCIENCE
March 30, 2005 | John Johnson, Times Staff Writer
In a sunlit gallery of the Museo Archeologico Nazionale in Italy, astronomer Brad Schaefer came face to face with an ancient statue known as the Farnese Atlas. For centuries, the 7-foot marble figure of the mythological Atlas has bent in stoic agony with a sphere of the cosmos crushing his shoulders.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | STEVE CHAWKINS, Times Staff Writer
Fifty-three years after he hopped aboard a freighter plying trade routes in the Caribbean, the old salt can reel off his first ports of call like a train conductor calling out the suburban stops: "Porto Padre, Juan Claro, Aguadilla, Mayaguez, Ponce," he intones. He can tell you the number of feet stem-to-stern on the ship, the S.S. Carleton, and on his next two vessels, the S.S. LaBette and the West Comack.
NEWS
July 15, 1988 | LEE DEMBART
Coming of Age in the Milky Way by Timothy Ferris (William Morrow and Co.: $19.95; 495 pages) The history and development of science is civilization's best story. Starting with the ancient Greeks more than 2,500 years ago, it is the saga of humanity's use of its intelligence to understand the world and the universe around us.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | STEVE CHAWKINS, Times Staff Writer
Fifty-three years after he hopped aboard a freighter plying trade routes in the Caribbean, the old salt can reel off his first ports of call like a train conductor calling out the suburban stops: "Porto Padre, Juan Claro, Aguadilla, Mayaguez, Ponce," he intones. He can tell you the number of feet stem-to-stern on the ship, the S.S. Carleton, and on his next two vessels, the S.S. LaBette and the West Comack.
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