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Science In The Public Interest Organization

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BUSINESS
January 27, 1989 | BRIAN J. COUTURIER, Times Staff Writer
The Federal Trade Commission on Thursday accused Campbell Soup Co. of deceptive advertising for claiming that the firm's Chicken Noodle soup may help reduce the risk of heart disease without disclosing its salt content. The FTC administrative complaint said Campbell's advertisement, which appeared in national magazines last winter, failed to disclose that its soups contain high levels of sodium, which may contribute to heart disease.
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BUSINESS
January 27, 1989 | BRIAN J. COUTURIER, Times Staff Writer
The Federal Trade Commission on Thursday accused Campbell Soup Co. of deceptive advertising for claiming that the firm's Chicken Noodle soup may help reduce the risk of heart disease without disclosing its salt content. The FTC administrative complaint said Campbell's advertisement, which appeared in national magazines last winter, failed to disclose that its soups contain high levels of sodium, which may contribute to heart disease.
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NEWS
July 22, 2011 | By Daniela Hernandez, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Nothing's ever as simple as we'd like it to be. A case in point: Policies that simply increase access to supermarkets may not get  people to choose an apple over ice cream , a recent study reported . Changing people's eating habits is difficult, in other words.  One reason is money.   Healthful foods such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean meats and dairy, can often be pricey.  For the cost of a couple of peaches, a person can get a full meal on the dollar menu at a fast-food outlet.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2009 | Alana Semuels
The airwaves are getting more grown-up, and it's not just the shows. The Absolut Vodka commercials that aired in Los Angeles and 14 other cities during Sunday night's Grammy Awards marked the first time in years that liquor ads ran in prime time on network-owned stations. Also crowding the airwaves during heavy viewing hours are infomercials once reserved for the middle of the night and ads touting extramarital affairs and the intimate uses of K-Y Jelly.
HEALTH
July 6, 2009 | Chris Woolston
Obesity is a national health crisis -- or it isn't. Vaccines cause autism -- or they don't. Think of any current health controversy, and you can be sure that plenty of experts have already taken opposite sides. Some of the most influential and vocal health experts belong to advocacy organizations such as the Center for Science in the Public Interest and the American Council on Science and Health.
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