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BUSINESS
June 4, 1986
According to the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science and Time Inc. sources, Time offered about $5 million for the award-winning but money-losing magazine. In addition to Time, Life, Fortune and other publications, Time Inc. publishes Discover--also an award-winning but money-losing magazine in the troubled science magazine field. The company is also reportedly seeking to buy Scientific American magazine.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 20, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Multinational food corporations have a growing influence on the health of people around the world, including obesity, and their actions need greater scrutiny, according to an editorial Tuesday in the journal Public Library of Science Medicine. The editorial kicks off the journal's three-week series looking at what it calls “Big Food.” The first articles, and the editorial, criticize not just the food companies but also officials charged with protecting public health. “The big multinational food companies control what people everywhere eat, resulting in a stark and sick irony: one billion people on the planet are hungry while 2 billion are obese or overweight,” the editorial says.
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BUSINESS
December 7, 2000 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The prestigious journal Science is on the verge of striking an unusual bargain: In return for the right to publish a path-breaking paper on the human genetic code, it would allow the paper's biotech company authors to make their supporting data accessible only to those who promise not to use them for commercial or certain other purposes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2010 | James Rainey
Revenue plummets right along with dreary circulation. Time slashes its staff. Newsweek hovers near extinction. Survival and stable footing seem assured only for the frothiest and most specialized magazines. Yet one woman looks into this bleak media sea and sees an opportunity, if not to make money, to fill a void with serious, solutions-oriented journalism. The result is Miller-McCune, a bimonthly journal that focuses on social issues and public policy with the same passion that supermarket glossies lavish on "Biggest Loser" photo spreads and Heidi Montag's latest turn under the plastic surgeon's knife.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1997
The HMS Beagle, named after the ship in which Charles Darwin sailed to the Galapagos, is an online science magazine. You can find it at: http://biomednet.com/hmsbeagle/
NEWS
August 25, 1989 | From Reuters
A Swiss scientist has suggested cooling down the Earth by unfurling a sunshade half the size of the United States in space. Walter Seifritz says in the latest edition of the science magazine Nature that his solution to the "greenhouse effect," the warming of the atmosphere through pollutants retaining the sun's heat, is "a remote but feasible possibility."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1989 | Compiled from Times Wire and Staff Reports
The editors of Science magazine have for the first time chosen a "Molecule of the Year," representative of the most significant scientific achievement. The first winner is an enzyme called DNA polymerase that can be used in the laboratory for making large quantities of any particular piece of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid, the genetic blueprint of life) through a process known as polymerase chain reaction or PCR.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1988 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Studies purporting to show that the Earth's atmosphere contained 50% more oxygen during the time of the dinosaurs are wrong, researchers reported last week. The original claim was made by researchers from Yale University and the U.S. Geological Survey, who analyzed air that they said had been trapped in amber--yellow-colored, fossilized resin from trees--some 80 million years ago.
OPINION
January 1, 2004
At the end of 2000, science was swollen with the self-importance of a century that ended with the remarkable mapping of the chemical codes that make up human DNA. Old scourges such as cancer suddenly seemed conquerable. By contrast, 2003 is likely to be remembered as the year when science came back to earth. To be sure, last year saw plenty of good research and discovery. Look no further than a paper published today in the British journal Nature.
OPINION
August 7, 1988
The recent controversy over the publication by the British science magazine Nature of seemingly impossible results says much about science, scientists and the scientific method. The brouhaha erupted a few weeks ago when Nature, one of the world's most respected science journals, published a research paper by Dr.
SCIENCE
March 16, 2007 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
The ice at Mars' south pole contains enough water to cover the planet in an ocean 36 feet deep, scientists said today. Observations by the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter determined the ice -- largely covered by dust and rock -- is more than two miles thick in places and is nearly pure water, according to research being published in the journal Science.
SCIENCE
March 2, 2007 | Robert Lee Hotz, Times Staff Writer
A vast undersea wedge of gravel and grit holds the ice streams of West Antarctica in place like a doorstop, even as rising seas caused by global warming threaten to undermine them, researchers at Pennsylvania State University said Thursday. The discovery may give the world a bit of breathing room. West Antarctica encompasses enough frozen fresh water -- 7 million cubic miles -- to raise sea levels worldwide 16 feet if its ice sheet disintegrates.
SCIENCE
November 29, 2006 | Karen Kaplan, Times Staff Writer
The journal Science must intensify its screening process to weed out fraudulent studies, an independent panel said Tuesday after investigating how the prestigious journal published two high-profile stem cell studies that turned out to be bogus. The report recommended that Science establish a system to red-flag studies that claim major breakthroughs in high-visibility fields -- such as climate change and human health -- that could influence public policy.
SCIENCE
January 14, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Science, the journal that published two now-discredited studies about embryonic stem cells by South Korean scientist Hwang Woo Suk, formally retracted them Thursday. Hwang won global acclaim in 2004 when he reported he had used cloning technology to create human embryos, and then mined them for valuable embryonic stem cells. He reported last year that he had taken this a step further, creating several tailored batches, or lines, of stem cells from diseased and injured volunteers.
SCIENCE
December 31, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The journal that published a landmark paper on tailor-made embryonic stem cells -- a study since debunked as a fabrication -- said this week it would retract the article. An expert panel in South Korea said Thursday that Hwang Woo Suk and his team provided no data to prove that they had made the stem cells, as they claimed in an article published in Science.
NATIONAL
May 13, 2005 | From Associated Press
When humans first left Africa, which way did they go? For many years, experts assumed these early migrants headed through what is now Egypt, across the Sinai and into the Middle East. But new evidence suggests they may have taken a more southerly route, along the coasts of the Arabian peninsula into India, Indonesia and Australia. Two reports in today's issue of the journal Science raise the possibility of the coastal route.
OPINION
February 2, 2003 | Margaret Wertheim, Margaret Wertheim writes the Quark Soup column on science and culture for the LA Weekly. This piece is based on a lecture she gave recently at Caltech.
America is not producing enough scientists and engineers. Not nearly enough. So concluded participants in a wide ranging summit on our science and engineering workforce held in late November at the National Academies in Washington. More than 50% of our doctoral engineering students are foreign nationals -- fully 43% come from Asia -- and increasingly these students are choosing to return to their home countries after graduation.
NATIONAL
November 1, 2002 | From Associated Press
In the largest block retraction ever published in the journal Science, eight papers by J. Hendrik Schon, the discredited researcher, are being withdrawn at the request of his coauthors. Schon, 32, was a science superstar at Lucent Technologies' Bell Labs. He published more than 80 papers in top journals, such as Science and Nature, and was sought out by other researchers because of his reputation for spectacular results with difficult problems in material sciences and electronics.
SCIENCE
December 18, 2004 | From Associated Press
The conclusive discovery by a pair of wheeled robots that Mars once had vast pools of water and possibly could have harbored life was chosen by the editors of the journal Science as the most important scientific achievement of 2004. "Inanimate, wheeled, one-armed boxes roaming another planet have done something no human has ever managed," Science reported in this week's edition. "They have discovered another place in the universe where life could once have existed."
OPINION
January 1, 2004
At the end of 2000, science was swollen with the self-importance of a century that ended with the remarkable mapping of the chemical codes that make up human DNA. Old scourges such as cancer suddenly seemed conquerable. By contrast, 2003 is likely to be remembered as the year when science came back to earth. To be sure, last year saw plenty of good research and discovery. Look no further than a paper published today in the British journal Nature.
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