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NEWS
November 14, 1986
AIDS "now ranks as the most serious epidemic of the last 50 years," an international group of researchers declared in a report that urges global cooperation to head off the spread of the deadly acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Noting that several million people around the world now are infected with the AIDS virus, the researchers called for "a major international commitment, not only in terms of providing financial help but also in providing scientific, educational and technical assistance."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1988
In Atlanta and certain other southern cities, trees may contribute more hydrocarbons to the formation of photochemical smog than do cars and factories, according to computer modeling studies conducted by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology. These emissions may doom the Environmental Protection Agency's attempt to control pollution by restricting release of man-made hydrocarbons, the researchers said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1990 | From staff and wire reports
More than a billion tons of carbon emitted into the atmosphere each year in the form of carbon dioxide cannot be accounted for but is probably being absorbed by land masses in the Northern Hemisphere, researchers from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reported last week in Science magazine. Release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is believed to be contributing to a warming of the planet through the greenhouse effect, which traps heat at the Earth's surface.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2001
Arthur Walker, 64, a Stanford physics professor whose work helped scientists investigate mysteries of the sun, died at his Stanford home April 29 of cancer. Using X-ray and thin-film telescopes, Walker photographed the sun's corona, or outermost atmosphere, obtaining images that were printed on the cover of the Sept. 30, 1988, Science magazine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2010 | By Steve Harvey, Los Angeles Times
The Palmdale Bulge ? it sounded like some sort of waistline problem afflicting middle-aged men. But it referred to something even more ominous in the mid-1970s ? the reported uplift of the Earth's crust by as much as 18 inches along the San Andreas fault in the Antelope Valley. Scientists wondered if it was the harbinger of a giant earthquake. Or perhaps a volcano. Southern Californians were uneasy in the aftermath of the 1971 Sylmar quake that killed 64. Stories of West Coast disaster were also trendy in the popular arts, whether it was author Curt Gentry's temblor tale "The Last Days of the Late, Great State of California"; the motion picture "Earthquake" (goodbye, Capitol Records tower)
WORLD
January 17, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
The world's largest surviving population of white rhinos suffered its heaviest toll on record last year when poachers killed more than 1,000 of the threatened animals to feed an international market for trinkets and potions made from their horns. The South African Department of Environmental Affairs reported Friday that it had counted 1,004 rhinos killed by poachers in 2013, mostly in Kruger National Park, along the porous border with Mozambique. It was the worst year for rhinoceros poaching since the government began tracking the illegal hunting in the early 1900s, National Geographic reported.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1986 | Associated Press
Science 86, the award-winning popular science magazine that helped pioneer a trend toward glossy, technical publications for lay readers, will cease publication with its current issue and sell some assets to Time Inc., it was announced Friday. The American Assn. for the Advancement of Science, which began publishing the magazine as Science 80 in the fall of 1979, said it is selling its Science 86 subscriber list and licensing the publication's name to Time for two years as part of the deal.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1997
Techniclone Corp., the Tustin developer of tumor treatments, is already trumpeting research advances by a company it's about to acquire. Techniclone announced last week that a study in 21 mice by the founding scientist of Princeton, N.J.-based Peregrine Pharmaceuticals suggests that cells inside solid tumors can be selectively targeted and starved to death. The scientist, Dr.
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