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NEWS
September 26, 1994 | DENNIS ROMERO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As San Diego surfing veteran John Elwell tells it, someone spied a speck on the rough, rarely ridden outside break. It was December, 1949, and the boys had just paddled out into the frigid water of the Tijuana Slough, a surfing spot just north of the border. A second take revealed that there was indeed a mysterious figure speeding across the face of a towering swell. Unheard of. Nobody had seen him before, so they dubbed him the Phantom Surfer.
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BUSINESS
July 1, 1986 | Associated Press
Science 86, the award-winning popular science magazine that helped pioneer a trend toward glossy, technical publications for lay readers, will cease publication with its current issue and sell some assets to Time Inc., it was announced Friday. The American Assn. for the Advancement of Science, which began publishing the magazine as Science 80 in the fall of 1979, said it is selling its Science 86 subscriber list and licensing the publication's name to Time for two years as part of the deal.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1997
Techniclone Corp., the Tustin developer of tumor treatments, is already trumpeting research advances by a company it's about to acquire. Techniclone announced last week that a study in 21 mice by the founding scientist of Princeton, N.J.-based Peregrine Pharmaceuticals suggests that cells inside solid tumors can be selectively targeted and starved to death. The scientist, Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1987
An immense celestial cloud is collapsing upon itself and giving birth to giant stars, confirming a classic theory of how stars are created, according to researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. In a report being published today in Science magazine, they said at least a dozen stars already have formed in a huge ring at the core of the gas cloud known as W49A. Others are still being formed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1988 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A sensitive new technique for detecting which genes are active has been developed by cell biologists at UC San Francisco and Cetus Corp. of Emeryville. The researchers reported last week in Science magazine that they had used the technique to show conclusively that macrophages, the scavenger cells of the immune system, produce several growth factors that stimulate healing in human wounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1988
The earth's protective ozone layer has been thinning out around the world, not just over the South Pole, according to a new analysis of satellite data that was promptly disowned by the government agency that sponsored the study. Writing in the latest edition of the widely respected Science magazine, Kenneth P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
Stanford researchers have reported what appears to be the first significant use of monoclonal antibodies to help transplant tissues in animals. Transplant recipients often have trouble incorporating foreign tissues into their bodies, and doctors have had to rely on powerful and often dangerous drugs to keep such patients from rejecting the transplants. If the Stanford discovery eventually helps humans overcome the rejection problem, it would make transplants much safer.
NEWS
October 16, 1992 | From Reuters
Scientists said Thursday they had created a genetically engineered mouse that rapidly develops high levels of artery-hardening cholesterol--an advance that should speed heart disease research. The mice accumulate blood cholesterol levels five times higher than normal even when fed regular diets and their arteries rapidly narrow with fatty deposits, condensing into four months a process that takes 40 years in humans.
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