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Science Museum School

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NEWS
September 27, 1992 | JAKE DOHERTY
The California Museum of Science and Technology will receive $39.9 million in state money to replace or renovate two museum buildings that do not meet earthquake safety standards. Legislation signed last week by Gov. Pete Wilson also provides $31.6 million for the construction of the Science Museum School, an elementary school specializing in science education. The school will be operated by the Los Angeles Unified School District in cooperation with the museum and the USC School of Education.
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NEWS
September 27, 1992 | JAKE DOHERTY
The California Museum of Science and Technology will receive $39.9 million in state money to replace or renovate two museum buildings that do not meet earthquake safety standards. Legislation signed last week by Gov. Pete Wilson also provides $31.6 million for the construction of the Science Museum School, an elementary school specializing in science education. The school will be operated by the Los Angeles Unified School District in cooperation with the museum and the USC School of Education.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1992 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stacked atop a filing cabinet at the Los Angeles Unified School District, three architectural models and nine fanciful drawings are giving officials their first glimpse of a project designed to change the way this city's children learn about science. Brought to life in bits of cardboard and balsa wood are three distinctive visions of the Manual Arts New Elementary School No. 1, to be located next to the California Museum of Science and Industry in Exposition Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1992 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stacked atop a filing cabinet at the Los Angeles Unified School District, three architectural models and nine fanciful drawings are giving officials their first glimpse of a project designed to change the way this city's children learn about science. Brought to life in bits of cardboard and balsa wood are three distinctive visions of the Manual Arts New Elementary School No. 1, to be located next to the California Museum of Science and Industry in Exposition Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2000
The long-dormant Armory Building in Exposition Park will soon see new life, thanks to a $10-million federal grant. The building has been closed to the public since 1990 because of earthquake safety concerns. The grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency will pay most of the cost of seismic retrofitting, the first step in a $46-million renovation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1993 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Museum of Science and Industry, the leader of a long-term drive to renovate Exposition Park, is finalizing plans for the first phase of that overhaul: a new museum building. Architects have completed schematic designs for an innovative 225,000-square-foot structure just south of the park's rose garden, where the 81-year-old Howard F. Ahmanson building stands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1992 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to improve the "schizophrenic" image of Los Angeles' Exposition Park, architects hired by the state have proposed a sweeping $350-million renovation that would transform the fragmented, asphalt-laden area into a lush "outdoor living room" for the city. In a draft master plan completed at the behest of the California Museum of Science and Industry, the architects conclude that the 160-acre park serves cars better than it does people.
NEWS
May 24, 1996 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When visitors enter St. Mary's Cathedral in San Francisco, their eyes quickly swoop up and jaws slacken in astonishment. Twenty stories high, the interior is an eight-sided cone of concrete with a stained-glass cross that pierces the heavens. It is unlike any church they have ever seen. Many worshipers have found divine inspiration within its walls since the Roman Catholic cathedral was dedicated 25 years ago.
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