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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1988 | GAYLE YOUNG, Young is a science writer for United Press International.
In the 1950s, anthropologists who traveled to Australia to study the aborigines reported that the men bonded with each other and kept their women at bay with secret ceremonies and dazzling displays of magic they said came from the gods. It was not until a woman anthropologist recently studied the same peoples that it was learned that aborigine women knew the magic was a hoax, indulgently humored the men and had a good laugh about it behind their backs.
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SCIENCE
July 14, 2002 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For many women, it felt like a slap in the face. They had been given hormones for years at menopause to gain relief from hot flashes and night sweats. But as the years went by they were told something far grander: By continuing to take the drugs well past menopause, they could not only lessen their risk of osteoporosis but also possibly of heart disease, the leading cause of death for women. Now it seems the promise was not so bright.
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SPORTS
June 28, 1990 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angelica Gavaldon won her second-round match Wednesday at Wimbledon, which means she soon will be kneeling in the bathtub again. It was a routine day for Gavaldon, the 16-year-old from Coronado, Calif., who beat Sara Gomer, 7-5, 0-6, 7-5, then reaffirmed her position as possibly the quirkiest player in tennis. In her first season as a professional, Gavaldon has proved to be a veteran of superstitions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1991
The debate over abortion in this country has been described as the politics of symbolism. The symbols invoked are powerful and jarring: aborted fetuses, bloody coat hangers and chanting protesters who block public access to medical clinics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1988 | From Associated Press
Fit or fat? Women don't have to choose one or the other, according to researchers at Oregon State University. They can be both. During a nine-month study, 15 overweight women ate less fat and exercised regularly but not strenuously. Only six lost weight, but 11 in the group improved their health-risk factors. Blood cholesterol levels and blood pressure dropped, and aerobic capacity increased. Collaborating on the study were Jane Moore and James E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1991
The debate over abortion in this country has been described as the politics of symbolism. The symbols invoked are powerful and jarring: aborted fetuses, bloody coat hangers and chanting protesters who block public access to medical clinics.
SCIENCE
July 14, 2002 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For many women, it felt like a slap in the face. They had been given hormones for years at menopause to gain relief from hot flashes and night sweats. But as the years went by they were told something far grander: By continuing to take the drugs well past menopause, they could not only lessen their risk of osteoporosis but also possibly of heart disease, the leading cause of death for women. Now it seems the promise was not so bright.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Women are nearly twice as likely as men to die from a common form of coronary artery surgery--a fact that researchers now suspect reflects a tendency among physicians to neglect heart disease symptoms in women.
NEWS
February 11, 2007 | Erika Niedowski, Baltimore Sun
Dressed in black, Vladimir Rakovsky glides around with the air of a guru -- albeit a self-appointed one -- as he holds forth before a group of admiring students on the virtues of womanly wiles. This softly lighted room on the second floor of a Moscow theater is as appropriate a place as any to stage a master class for women on how to act -- literally -- to get men, and what they want from men.
SPORTS
December 1, 2000
ACADEMICS Five members of the UC Irvine women's cross-country team received Academic All-Big West honors. Seniors Allyson Kulak, a psychology/social behavior major from Fullerton, and Kareen Nilsson, an English/drama major from Chino Hills, were among those honored. To qualify, student-athletes must have at least a 3.2 grade-point average, at least sophomore standing and have competed in at least 50% of a team's contests.
SPORTS
June 28, 1990 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angelica Gavaldon won her second-round match Wednesday at Wimbledon, which means she soon will be kneeling in the bathtub again. It was a routine day for Gavaldon, the 16-year-old from Coronado, Calif., who beat Sara Gomer, 7-5, 0-6, 7-5, then reaffirmed her position as possibly the quirkiest player in tennis. In her first season as a professional, Gavaldon has proved to be a veteran of superstitions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Women are nearly twice as likely as men to die from a common form of coronary artery surgery--a fact that researchers now suspect reflects a tendency among physicians to neglect heart disease symptoms in women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1988 | From Associated Press
Fit or fat? Women don't have to choose one or the other, according to researchers at Oregon State University. They can be both. During a nine-month study, 15 overweight women ate less fat and exercised regularly but not strenuously. Only six lost weight, but 11 in the group improved their health-risk factors. Blood cholesterol levels and blood pressure dropped, and aerobic capacity increased. Collaborating on the study were Jane Moore and James E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1988 | GAYLE YOUNG, Young is a science writer for United Press International.
In the 1950s, anthropologists who traveled to Australia to study the aborigines reported that the men bonded with each other and kept their women at bay with secret ceremonies and dazzling displays of magic they said came from the gods. It was not until a woman anthropologist recently studied the same peoples that it was learned that aborigine women knew the magic was a hoax, indulgently humored the men and had a good laugh about it behind their backs.
OPINION
March 30, 2006 | Margaret Wertheim, MARGARET WERTHEIM is the author of the cultural history "Pythagoras' Trousers."
ON SATURDAY, hundreds of girls will flock to Caltech to celebrate the joys of science. Targeted at fifth- to eighth-graders, the Sally Ride Science Festival will encourage its pony-tailed and barretted audience to see science as a viable, vibrant career option. That Ride is using her cachet as our most famous female astronaut to champion the cause of girls in science is to be applauded; what is so dispiriting is that such efforts are still needed.
NEWS
March 16, 1986 | JANICE MALL
An unaesthetic picture of a crushed, smoking, lipstick-stained cigarette and ashes surrounded by the caption "Kiss Your Butt Good-bye" in large, bold letters is the eye-catching--and some will say not very genteel--new message aimed particularly at women by the American Lung Assn. of Los Angeles County. It will appear on buttons, posters and even T-shirts. The copy goes on to say, "There are two ways to kiss your butt good-bye. One is to quit smoking. The other is to keep smoking . . .
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