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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013 | By Maria L. La Ganga, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - David Perlman had two deadlines on his mind as he elbowed his way through the Exploratorium, cane in one hand, notebook in the other. As the San Francisco Chronicle's veteran science writer, Perlman has been covering the granddaddy of hands-on science museums since it was just a glimmer of an idea in the fertile mind of physicist Frank Oppenheimer, the "uncle of the atom bomb. " Now, after 43 years in the elegant but drafty Palace of Fine Arts, the museum was getting ready to close before moving to new digs on the Embarcadero, and it was Perlman's job to chronicle the last day in its original home.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Katie Couric may want to brush up on her reporting skills before she takes on her new role as "global anchor" at Yahoo! , according to a number of critics displeased with a report about the HPV vaccine on her syndicated talk show, "Katie. " In a segment that aired Wednesday, Couric and a panel of guests discussed the supposed controversy surrounding the vaccine, known as Gardasil, which prevents transmission of a sexually transmitted disease that affects an estimated 79 million Americans and has been linked to numerous forms of cancer, particularly cervical.
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NEWS
September 16, 1989
Thomas A. Heppenheimer, a nationally known science writer from Fountain Valley, was listed in fair condition Friday with three gunshot wounds, UC Irvine Medical Center officials said. Fountain Valley police said that Heppenheimer, 42, was reported shot at his home on Thursday by his longtime companion. Police said they are not recommending filing of charges because they believe Angela Lee Johnson, 30, acted in self-defense after Heppenheimer threatened her. Johnson was not hurt, police said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2013 | By Karen R. Long
Spider webs combine a strength and elasticity unmatched by anything we humans can make. They don't trigger much of an immune response in us and are "insoluble in water, two facts that the classical Greeks exploited when they used cobwebs to patch bleeding wounds," notes science writer Adam Rutherford. These days, spider silk has inspired another innovative use. Utah State University researchers have spliced DNA from the golden orb-weaver spider into the genome of a goat named Freckles, adjacent to her own coded base pairs for prompting the production of milk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2007 | From a Times Staff Writer
Irving S. Bengelsdorf, a longtime science writer, editor and columnist whose work appeared in the Los Angeles Times and the Los Angeles Herald Examiner, has died. He was 84. Bengelsdorf died June 22 of kidney failure at his home in Oceanside, said his widow, Beverly. Not many research chemists make the career switch to journalism, but that is what Bengelsdorf did in the early 1960s, when he gave up a job at U.S. Borax to become science editor at The Times.
NEWS
May 16, 1987 | LEE DEMBART
Selling Science: How the Press Covers Science and Technology by Dorothy Nelkin (Freeman: $16.95) Dorothy Nelkin writes with great concern and some accuracy about the coverage of science and technology by the press. She is a keen observer of the pitfalls and limitations of daily journalism, so she gets the facts right. Her conclusions are not as good.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | LEE SIEGEL, Associated Press
Why do poison toads attend a frog orgy? Are you aware there is irrefutable evidence of intelligent life on Mars? And if the moon takes a month to revolve around Earth, why is it seen over Detroit every night? Those strange questions--and a bizarre variety of theories--were contained in several dozen letters received by the nation's science writers and entered in a contest called "Ideas Galileo Never Thought Of." The Northern California Science Writers Assn.
NEWS
April 3, 2005 | Emma Ross, Associated Press Writer
Seconds before stepping up to the coals, I was semi-sure that I wouldn't burn my feet if I embraced my fear. Never one for perilous adventures, I resolved to consider walking on hot coals on the promise that the experience might ignite the courage to lead a more fulfilling life. That was the lure of the four-day emotional boot camp that drew this science writer to the Tony Robbins weekend seminar, called "Unleash the Power Within."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2012 | By Connie Stewart, Los Angeles Times
Who knew yoga could be so dangerous? Or is the risk overblown? A woman falls asleep in seated forward fold and damages both sciatic nerves. A man sits on his heels for hours (over a period of days or weeks) and deadens nerves in his lower legs. A woman practices Kapalbhati — forceful exhaling — and collapses a lung. A woman attempting the wheel — essentially, making the body arc like a croquet wicket — balances on her head, bends her neck backward and suffers a stroke. Author William J. Broad, a yogi since 1970 and the chief science writer for the New York Times, remains devoted to the practice.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Am I the only one who feels bad for Jonah Lehrer? The disgraced science writer, who lost his staff writer job at the New Yorker - and, quite possibly, his career - last summer after it was revealed that he had made up quotes (by Bob Dylan, of all people) in his book “Imagine,” was back in the news this week after giving a talk at the Knight Foundation's Media Learning Seminar; for the 3,500 word lecture, he received a payment of $20,000. Reaction has been uniformly negative, with pointed posts in the New York Times , Forbes and Los Angeles Magazine . But while I don't necessarily disagree with such commentary, I also think it misses the point.
SCIENCE
May 8, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Birds do it. Bees do it. And bats do it too: They use their weirdly gifted tongues to lap up as much nectar with every lick. The sugar-loving bats sport hundreds of hair-like structures on their tongue tips that stand on end when erectile tissue in their tongues fill with blood. Those hairs hold extra nectar suspended between the erect bristles , according to a study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - rather like a honey dipper picks up more sticky sweet stuff in between its ridges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2013 | By Maria L. La Ganga, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - David Perlman had two deadlines on his mind as he elbowed his way through the Exploratorium, cane in one hand, notebook in the other. As the San Francisco Chronicle's veteran science writer, Perlman has been covering the granddaddy of hands-on science museums since it was just a glimmer of an idea in the fertile mind of physicist Frank Oppenheimer, the "uncle of the atom bomb. " Now, after 43 years in the elegant but drafty Palace of Fine Arts, the museum was getting ready to close before moving to new digs on the Embarcadero, and it was Perlman's job to chronicle the last day in its original home.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Am I the only one who feels bad for Jonah Lehrer? The disgraced science writer, who lost his staff writer job at the New Yorker - and, quite possibly, his career - last summer after it was revealed that he had made up quotes (by Bob Dylan, of all people) in his book “Imagine,” was back in the news this week after giving a talk at the Knight Foundation's Media Learning Seminar; for the 3,500 word lecture, he received a payment of $20,000. Reaction has been uniformly negative, with pointed posts in the New York Times , Forbes and Los Angeles Magazine . But while I don't necessarily disagree with such commentary, I also think it misses the point.
SCIENCE
December 11, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel
Have you ever been to a TED conference - those immersion events aimed at facilitating cross-fertilization between attendees and speakers and "inspiration from unlikely places”?  If you have, you likely shelled out: An upcoming Long Beach event, “The Young. The Wise. The Undiscovered.” running Feb. 25 - March 1, costs $7,500 to attend. It's sold out . TEDx conferences are a little different: Planned and coordinated separately from TED events and far  cheaper and easier to get into, they're still licensed by TED (with a lot of rules )
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2012 | By Jeff VanderMeer, Special to the Los Angeles Times
2312 A Novel Kim Stanley Robinson Orbit: 576 pp., $25.99 As the author of the "Mars" trilogy, among other novels, Kim Stanley Robinson has established a superlative reputation for science fictional extrapolation. In his vibrant, often moving new novel, "2312," Robinson's extrapolation is hard-wired to a truly affecting personal love story. By the year of the book's title, humankind has (just barely) survived global warming, in part because of terra-forming technologies that have made possible the colonization of Mars, Mercury and Venus.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
In his fervid imagination, Ray Bradbury roamed across time and space. But as a longtime Angeleno, he was deeply rooted in the otherworldly landscapes and swiftly evolving human topography of his adopted home of Southern California. Not only did Los Angeles, where Bradbury lived for decades, help shape his fantasy andsci-fiwritings. The author also was known across the city as a beloved and familiar figure: supportive of the local literary and theater communities, a regular at bookstore readings and speaking engagements, a haunter of libraries and bookshops, and an enthusiastic promoter of the culture of reading.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Who says science doesn't turn people on? Kate McAlpine is a rising star on YouTube for her rap performance -- about high-energy particle physics. Her performance has drawn half a million views so far on YouTube. The 23-year-old Michigan State University graduate and science writer raps about the Large Hadron Collider, the groundbreaking particle accelerator that has been built in a 17-mile circular tunnel at the CERN laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland. McAlpine raps that when the $3.8-billion collider goes into operation Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2000
Although Michael Faraday was something of a religious eccentric, he was not known to make a practice of communing with the dead. The famous "of what use is a newborn baby" conversation cited by Times science writer K.C. Cole ('Physics Finds a Function, Even for the Unfathomable," June 29) was more likely to have involved Queen Victoria than Queen Isabella, although if you surf the Internet you'll find Faraday in the same dialogue with Disraeli, Napoleon and a variety of other historical luminaries.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2012 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
Hollywood's full of interesting figures with dreams - struggling actors and writers who wait tables, walk dogs or sell insurance on the side. In the 1980s and early '90s, Leonard Mlodinow was likely one of the most unexpected: a theoretical physicist-turned-scriptwriter. When TV action hero MacGyver or the Starship Enterprise crew needed new dilemmas to solve, the UC Berkeley-trained scientist was there to supply them. "I just really loved films and thought I should be writing screenplays," said the bestselling science writer on a recent sunny afternoon at Caltech, where he's a lecturer.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2012 | By Connie Stewart, Los Angeles Times
Who knew yoga could be so dangerous? Or is the risk overblown? A woman falls asleep in seated forward fold and damages both sciatic nerves. A man sits on his heels for hours (over a period of days or weeks) and deadens nerves in his lower legs. A woman practices Kapalbhati — forceful exhaling — and collapses a lung. A woman attempting the wheel — essentially, making the body arc like a croquet wicket — balances on her head, bends her neck backward and suffers a stroke. Author William J. Broad, a yogi since 1970 and the chief science writer for the New York Times, remains devoted to the practice.
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