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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1997
Science is wonderful. It has succeeded where nature has failed. Lo and behold, it has removed the flavor from peaches and watermelons. HARRY LEVIN Woodland Hills
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2013 | By Karen R. Long
Spider webs combine a strength and elasticity unmatched by anything we humans can make. They don't trigger much of an immune response in us and are "insoluble in water, two facts that the classical Greeks exploited when they used cobwebs to patch bleeding wounds," notes science writer Adam Rutherford. These days, spider silk has inspired another innovative use. Utah State University researchers have spliced DNA from the golden orb-weaver spider into the genome of a goat named Freckles, adjacent to her own coded base pairs for prompting the production of milk.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
After reading my weekend column about the crisis in life science research, Hajime Hoji of USC's linguistics department reminded me of the late Richard Feynman's brilliant deconstruction of the flaws and pitfalls of science as it's done in the modern age. "Cargo Cult Science" was adapted from Feynman's 1974 commencement speech at Caltech, where his spirit reigns as one of that institution's two certified saints. (The other is Robert A. Millikan, Caltech's first president.)
OPINION
December 2, 2006
Re "Fundamentalism for adults only," Current, Nov. 26 Michael Bywater wrongly blames science for the deficiencies of those who do not understand it. He claims that science includes "articles of faith," when in fact it deals exclusively with logic and mathematically quantifiable confidence. He tries to equate religion and science, but only the latter necessarily shows its work. Bywater characterizes religion as a "valid way of thinking," though logical validity entails truth preservation, which faith does not. Religion also "delivers results," but only in the form of comfort, not knowledge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2001
Re "$1-Million Templeton Prize Goes to British Priest," March 9: With all due respect for the Rev. Canon Arthur Peacocke, who has devoted a substantial chunk of professional energy to higher learning, his conclusions as presented by The Times are sophomoric at best. His attempted rapprochement between religion (Christianity for Peacocke) and science amounts to little more than self-help theorizing for Christian intellectuals. Yes, biological systems are immensely complicated, and therefore there must be a God who made it all and will grant us everlasting life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1994
Your editorial, "Science Must Police Its Ranks" (Nov. 30), contains several factual and conceptual errors that should not pass uncorrected. First, regarding the Thereza Imanishi-Kari case, Nobelist David Baltimore did not indulge in "a questionable practice that is too common, his name was put on the paper even though he had nothing directly to do with the study." In fact, the publication in Cell in 1986 was a product of a collaboration between the laboratories of Baltimore and Imanishi-Kari, and much of the data in the paper were generated in Baltimore's laboratory, not in Imanishi-Kari's.
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