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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1997
Science is wonderful. It has succeeded where nature has failed. Lo and behold, it has removed the flavor from peaches and watermelons. HARRY LEVIN Woodland Hills
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OPINION
December 2, 2006
Re "Fundamentalism for adults only," Current, Nov. 26 Michael Bywater wrongly blames science for the deficiencies of those who do not understand it. He claims that science includes "articles of faith," when in fact it deals exclusively with logic and mathematically quantifiable confidence. He tries to equate religion and science, but only the latter necessarily shows its work. Bywater characterizes religion as a "valid way of thinking," though logical validity entails truth preservation, which faith does not. Religion also "delivers results," but only in the form of comfort, not knowledge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2001
Re "$1-Million Templeton Prize Goes to British Priest," March 9: With all due respect for the Rev. Canon Arthur Peacocke, who has devoted a substantial chunk of professional energy to higher learning, his conclusions as presented by The Times are sophomoric at best. His attempted rapprochement between religion (Christianity for Peacocke) and science amounts to little more than self-help theorizing for Christian intellectuals. Yes, biological systems are immensely complicated, and therefore there must be a God who made it all and will grant us everlasting life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1994
Your editorial, "Science Must Police Its Ranks" (Nov. 30), contains several factual and conceptual errors that should not pass uncorrected. First, regarding the Thereza Imanishi-Kari case, Nobelist David Baltimore did not indulge in "a questionable practice that is too common, his name was put on the paper even though he had nothing directly to do with the study." In fact, the publication in Cell in 1986 was a product of a collaboration between the laboratories of Baltimore and Imanishi-Kari, and much of the data in the paper were generated in Baltimore's laboratory, not in Imanishi-Kari's.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2012 | By John HoeffelLos Angeles Times
As the Republican presidential race has shown, the conservatives who dominate the primaries are deeply skeptical of science — making Newt Gingrich, for one, regret he ever settled onto a couch with Nancy Pelosi to chat about global warming. A study released Thursday in the American Sociological Review concludes that trust in science among conservatives and frequent churchgoers has declined precipitously since 1974, when a national survey first asked people how much confidence they had in the scientific community.
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Stacey Leasca
After combing through 656,000 photos on Instagram from five global cities, a team of data researchers has come to a conclusion: Selfies say more about you than you think. The science of selfies is serious business, says Lev Manovich, project coordinator behind SelfieCity.net. “Selfies, you know we have interesting opinion, but they are just based on maybe a few thousand selfies we look at,” said the Russian-born researcher and author in heavily accented English. “We thought, why don't we take a more objective look.” To study the selfie phenomenon, Manovich -- a computer science professor at City University New York -- and a team of seven researchers scanned the globe.
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