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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1989
Kudos to The Times for its Science/Medicine page. The attractive format and up-to-date information from such prestigious journals as Science, Nature and the New England Journal of Medicine make it a valuable addition to an already outstanding newspaper. Since the average person does not have easy access to these journals you are performing a much needed service. Preventive medicine should be one of this country's top priorities making articles such as "Sun, Skin and Cancer" (July 3)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1990 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The extraordinary case of a Florida dentist suspected of having spread the AIDS virus to a patient has left federal health officials ensnared in an emotional debate over whether to place new restrictions on the activities of infected doctors. A top AIDS official at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control said last week that the agency had been unable to settle on even a preliminary draft of a new policy. Asked when one might be forthcoming, he said, "Don't hold your breath."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1988 | Compiled from Times staff and wire reports
Three out of four adults may be vulnerable to deadly diphtheria even if they were vaccinated against the disease as children, according to two Vanderbilt University doctors who say that the medical community should work to have all adults revaccinated regularly. The warning, published in the current New England Journal of Medicine, comes in the wake of a diphtheria outbreak in Scandanavia where virtually all of the people were vaccinated as children. Drs. David T. Karzon and Kathryn M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Psyllium, a cereal grain that is supposed to do wonders for a person's cholesterol count, may spark a life-threatening allergic reaction. Allergist Martin J. Kaplan of Highland Park, Ill., reported in the New England Journal of Medicine that a 43-year-old patient developed an allergic reaction shortly after eating Kellogg's Heartwise cereal, which contains psyllium. Her face, eyes, mouth and tongue swelled, and she coughed and vomited before fainting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1987
Some people diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease apparently don't have the disorder, but really suffer neurological damage as a result of workplace exposure to metal vapors and dry cleaning solvents, a Los Angeles researcher said. USC psychologist David Freed, who is also co-director of the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center Consortium of Southern California, used a picture-recognition test to check the memory of 80 elderly patients diagnosed as having Alzheimer's disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1987
A widely publicized study showing the oxygen content of Earth's atmosphere has dropped sharply since the era of the dinosaurs was disputed last week at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco. But the author of the original study, Yale University geochemist Robert Berner, insisted his findings are correct in showing Earth's air 80 million years ago contained 32% oxygen, compared to 21% today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1987 | Compiled from Staff and Wire Reports and
Roughly four in five Americans can neither define genetic engineering nor grasp enough about the science to understand the moral and ethical issues involved. Despite their admitted lack of knowledge, the public is generally optimistic about the potential benefits of genetic engineering. These and other findings regarding genetic engineering were revealed in the report of a study conducted by Research & Forecasts Inc. for Novo Industri A/S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1987
Engineers have developed a new human-powered hydrofoil that speeds through the water powered by a propeller pedaled like a bicycle and may be used in a bid to set a world record. The prototype craft has already undergone extensive testing and could be ready to attempt to set a world speed mark by the end of the summer, said Arthur G. Erdman, a mechanical engineering professor at the University of Minnesota.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1987
A widely publicized study showing the oxygen content of Earth's atmosphere has dropped sharply since the era of the dinosaurs has been disputed by a scientist who measured air bubbles trapped in fossilized tree resin. But the author of the original study, Yale University geochemist Robert Berner, insisted his findings are correct in showing Earth's air 80 million years ago contained 32% oxygen, compared with 21% today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1987
A mission to look for water at the moon's polar latitudes has been proposed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory scientist Dr. Albert Metzger. "The actual presence of water as trapped ice would not only be scientifically significant but would have major implications for future operations on the moon," Metzger told the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Society. Metzger said JPL is studying the feasibility of launching a low-altitude spacecraft from an expendable vehicle into a lunar polar orbit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Researchers at Columbia University, in a first, have used satellite imagery to track the progress of a mammoth iceberg after it broke off from the coast of Antarctica. The study, reported in the journal Antarctic Science, has provided never before available information about ocean currents around the southernmost continent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New memories are processed in the hippocampus over a period of several weeks before being permanently stored elsewhere in the brain, psychiatrists Stuart M. Zola-Morgan and Larry R. Squire of UC San Diego reported last week in the journal Science. The new discovery helps to explain why damage to the hippocampus, common in some types of degenerative diseases, interferes with the victim's ability to learn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Researchers at the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge, England, have fabricated light-emitting transistors, or diodes, from organic polymers and predict that these diodes could be used to make inexpensive displays for electronic equipment, possibly including television screens. Light-emitting diodes made from conventional metallic semiconductors are expensive and too inefficient for most such uses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, Steinbrook, a physician, is a Times medical writer
In recent months, encouraging reports about the use of interferon to treat patients with chronic viral hepatitis have been widely publicized. But many specialists in liver disease remain uncertain of the significance of the findings and caution that claims of a "cure" are exaggerated. The case of interferon is only the latest illustration of a recurrent problem for physicians and the press--how to present news of medical advances with accuracy, not hype.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Although the San Andreas Fault is probably the most intensely studied earthquake system in the world, the Loma Prieta earthquake that struck last Oct. 17 told scientists something they didn't want to hear: There's still a lot they don't understand. "We learned there are some surprises," said William Bakun of the U.S. Geological Survey's Menlo Park office. "We don't understand as much about earthquakes as we thought we did."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A 7-year-old pygmy chimpanzee in a Georgia primate center may reignite a long-festering controversy over a question that is fundamental to the identification of humans as a unique product of evolution: Can other animals use language? For the last three decades, researchers have shown that chimps, pigeons, dolphins and other animals can manipulate word symbols in a manner that some say demonstrates comprehension and correct use of language.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1987 | Compiled from Staff and Wire Reports and
California Health Director Kenneth W. Kizer has announced a major milestone for the California Newborn Screening Program. The 3 millionth infant has been screened for serious developmental disorders, and since inception of the program in October, 1980, not a single case has escaped detection, Kizer said. The California Newborn Screening Program examines over 99% of California's newborn babies, which number nearly 500,000 a year now.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1987 | Compiled from Staff and Wire Reports and
Scientists have successfully produced new, higher-yielding breeds of corn that consistently have faster rates of photosynthesis, the life process that green plants use to make food, the Agriculture Department said. Doyle B. Peters, a research leader in the department's Agricultural Research Service at Urbana, Ill., said the seven-year project, now in its final year, leaves "no doubt that we have bred corn that manufactures its food more efficiently."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1989
Kudos to The Times for its Science/Medicine page. The attractive format and up-to-date information from such prestigious journals as Science, Nature and the New England Journal of Medicine make it a valuable addition to an already outstanding newspaper. Since the average person does not have easy access to these journals you are performing a much needed service. Preventive medicine should be one of this country's top priorities making articles such as "Sun, Skin and Cancer" (July 3)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
This remarkable new imaging technique is being developed to enable biologists to view all but the smallest components of living cells. Humans have long had a fascination with things too small to be seen with the naked eye. As long as 3,000 years ago, engravers used glass globes filled with water as magnifiers as they worked so that they could see fine details of their designs. Ancient Romans used crude lenses chipped from rock crystals for the same purpose.
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