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OPINION
June 23, 2013
Re "Why arts and humanities matter," Opinion, June 20 James Cuno laments the decline in emphasis on arts and humanities as more students are attracted to hard science and engineering because of a job market that "disproportionately" rewards these fields. I agree that the humanities enrich the human experience and that it is appropriate that an exposure to them is required for all graduates. But Cuno goes far beyond this, asserting that intelligence, passion, imagination and "the ability to connect with others" are all developed specifically by studying the humanities, without which future leaders will be unable to understand "what it is to be human.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By Howard Blume
A Los Angeles high school science teacher returned to the classroom Friday two months after being suspended over concerns that two students had assembled "dangerous" science projects under his supervision. Both projects overseen by teacher Greg Schiller were capable of launching small objects. A staff member at the downtown Cortines School of Visual & Performing Arts had raised concerns about one of them. Both are common in science fairs. "I am very excited to be back with my students and help them prepare for the Advanced Placement tests, which are a week away," Schiller said Thursday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
As an African American man pursuing a PhD in the sciences, Geoff Lovely has sometimes had to overcome a feeling that he didn't belong in the halls of top research universities where he saw few peers of color.  The Caltech student is intent on becoming a professor "where I think I can definitely make an impact" becoming a role model for other minority students interested in the sciences. A new venture announced Thursday aims to smooth a path for students like Lovely by joining the resources of four of California's top research institutions -- UCLA, Caltech, UC Berkelely and Stanford -- to increase the numbers of minority faculty and researchers in national laboratories and industry.
OPINION
April 24, 2014
Re "Are we losing the tech race?," Opinion, April 20 Michael Teitelbaum presents common-sense advice about majoring in science. He echoes what proponents of the liberal arts have been saying for years: that it is not enough to specialize in one area of expertise, and that science students must gain broad intellectual skills developed through the humanities, arts and social sciences. However, I disagree with Teitelbaum's assessment that science education for non-science majors should be limited to K-12.
OPINION
April 3, 2006
Margaret Wertheim takes a far stretch back to Pythagoras in seeking reasons for the present disparity in the numbers of female and male engineers, mathematicians and computer and physical scientists (Opinion, March 30). Far more harm today is done to the intellectual development of adolescent girls by the advice of school counselors and differential expectations by science and math teachers. Girls also are confronted with the derision of their male peers and the endless trumpeting of sexiness in popular culture as the goal to be attained.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2011 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
It's a sea change at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. In a surprise move announced late Thursday night, the academy went outside its organization and named Dawn Hudson, the head of Film Independent, to fill the chief executive position being vacated by retiring executive director Bruce Davis. Davis' longtime second in command, Ric Robertson, will be chief operating officer and will report to Hudson. The two will take over on June 1. The Board of Governors made the decision after a six-month search process in which the academy's officers — including producer Sid Ganis, screenwriter Phil Robinson, producer Hawk Koch, director Jim Brooks, actress Annette Bening and academy President Tom Sherak — interviewed a slew of potential candidates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1988
While I agree, in principle, with the thought that the humanities are not necessarily better or worse than the sciences, I cannot help but to conclude that the sciences are more reprehensible. No, not the laws of the universe (which include the laws of physics), but, rather, how those laws have been manipulated by men of "progressive" science. I suppose you can call it "progress" when you compare the crude implements of war our earliest ancestors used with the indescribable weapons of destruction currently possessed by the superpowers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Researchers in Illinois and Michigan are one step closer to finding a gene that predisposes individuals to non-insulin-dependent diabetes, the form of the disease that generally strikes older people and affects as many as 11 million Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1991 | ERIC HAMILTON
For Iris Critchell, the task of the day Thursday was to convince the more than 500 young women seated in front of her that math and science were noble undertakings. Critchell, 70, president of Bates Foundation for Aeronautical Education at Harvey Mudd College in Claremont and a former instructor there, was one of many speakers at a symposium to introduce careers in science and math to junior and senior high school students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
The University of Southern California will announce Wednesday its largest donation ever, a $200-million gift from alumnus David Dornsife, the chairman of a large steel fabricating company, and his wife, Dana. The Dornsifes' donation will go to USC's College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, the university's biggest academic unit, without restrictions on how it should be spent. It is expected to support faculty hiring, research and fellowships and be especially useful for the humanities and social sciences, which receive less funding than the sciences from federal and private sources.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Howard Blume
A Los Angeles high school science teacher is returning to the classroom two months after being suspended over concerns that two students had assembled "dangerous" science projects under his supervision. Both projects overseen by teacher Greg Schiller were capable of launching small objects. A staff member at the downtown Cortines School of Visual & Performing Arts had raised concerns about one of them. Both are common in science fairs. "I am very excited to be back with my students and help them prepare for the Advanced Placement tests, which are a week away," Schiller said Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Before he loved anything else, Jean-Luc Godard loved genre: He famously dedicated his first feature film, "Breathless," to Monogram Pictures, one of the monarchs of Poverty Row B-picture production. But as "Breathless" demonstrated, Godard never did anything straight up. He did genre his own playful way, and never more so than in 1965's "Alphaville," a film that was part science fiction, part hard-boiled adventure, and all Godard. Playing for a week at the Nuart in West Los Angeles in a sharp new digital restoration, "Alphaville" is more than quintessential Godard.
OPINION
April 22, 2014 | Patt Morrison
"Fracking" - now there's a word that just begs for a bumper sticker. Short for "hydraulic fracturing" - the process of breaking open rock with high-pressure liquids to get at otherwise untappable oil and natural gas - fracking conjures up a welcome energy boom for some, ecological disaster for others. Mark Zoback - Stanford geophysicist since 1984, member of the National Academy of Engineering's Deepwater Horizon investigation committee, personal "decarbonizer," fracking expert - sees the problems and the potential for California.
OPINION
April 10, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
In February, Los Angeles Unified School District officials suspended a teacher after two of his students turned in science projects that administrators thought looked like guns. Even granting that school officials have a right to be hypersensitive these days about anything resembling a weapon, their decision to remove him from the classroom was a harmful overreaction. It's also hard to understand why the investigation into this seemingly simple matter has taken more than a month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Howard Blume
A popular Los Angeles high school science teacher has been suspended after students turned in projects that appeared dangerous to administrators, spurring a campaign calling for his return to the classroom. Students and parents have rallied around Greg Schiller after his suspension in February from the downtown Cortines School of Visual & Performing Arts. Supporters have organized a rally on his behalf at the campus for Thursday, gathered hundreds of signatures on a petition calling for his reinstatement and set up a social media page.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | By Howard Blume
A popular Los Angeles high school science teacher has been suspended after students turned in projects that appeared dangerous to administrators, spurring a campaign calling for his return to the classroom. Students and parents have rallied around Greg Schiller after his suspension in February from the downtown Cortines School of Visual & Performing Arts. Supporters have organized a rally on his behalf at the campus scheduled for Thursday, gathered hundreds of signatures on a petition calling for his reinstatement and set up a social media page.
OPINION
April 3, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
It was well known for many years that Japan's "scientific whaling" program was a sham, designed to get around the international moratorium on hunting whales. Almost no research on the animals came from Japanese scientists; instead, whale meat kept showing up in restaurants and school lunches. Finally, Australia, a whaling country until 1978 and now an avid opponent, called Japan's bluff over the hundreds of whales it killed each year in the Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary surrounding Antarctica.
NEWS
April 1, 2014 | By Patt Morrison
If you love to spend your beach time on top of the water rather than in it, you can thank Hobie for helping you do it. Hobie Alter, the “Henry Ford of surfing,” who revolutionized surfing and put his name on whole lines of surfboards and catamarans, died at age 80 , leaving as his legacy a flotilla of floating devices, beginning with the first lighter-than-wood polyurethane foam surfboard crafted more than 50 years ago. But Alter was...
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