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SCIENCE
July 9, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
It's still an old wives' tale that a woman can plan her child's sex by timing the month when she conceives, but a new study has found that babies conceived at certain times of the year may be predisposed to adverse health outcomes, such as premature birth. Princeton University health economists Janet Currie and Hannes Schwandt observed a shorter gestation time for infants conceived during the first half of the year , with a “sharp trough” in May, possibly reflecting the spike in seasonal flu cases the following January and February, when their mothers were nearing full term.
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NEWS
May 3, 1987 | Associated Press
Charles Easton Rothwell, a drafter of the United Nations Charter and former president of Mills College, died at his home Friday. He was 84. Rothwell joined the U.S. State Department during World War II and had a hand in founding the United Nations. He was executive secretary of the 1945 conference in San Francisco that drafted the U.N. Charter. Rothwell obtained his bachelor of arts degree from Reed College in Portland, Ore.
NEWS
September 18, 1987 | MARY BARBER, Times Staff Writer
Harvey Mudd College students are among the country's brightest, but that did not make it any easier for a group of incoming freshman to break the ice at a recent orientation breakfast. The thaw finally came when one student complained that people thought he was saying "Harvard Med" when he told them where he was going to college. Others chimed in with "Harvey Who?" They had all heard that one dozens of times. Even "Elmer Who?" had a familiar ring.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1996
Ever since Oscar nominations were announced, everyone in Hollywood has been trying to apply the most diplomatic possible spin to the omission of director Ang Lee for "Sense and Sensibility." Why not call it for what it really is, the racist Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' latest snub to the Chinese film industry? DAVID R. MOSS Los Angeles
NEWS
July 21, 1985
Gerald Wasserburg of Caltech has been awarded the J. Lawrence Smith Medal of the National Academy of Sciences for his studies of meteorites and their ages and nuclear histories. The bronze medal carries with it a prize of $10,000. The medal, which was established in 1888 through the Smith Fund, is awarded for investigations of meteoritic bodies. Wasserburg is the John D. MacArthur professor of geology and geophysics at Caltech.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2006
Regarding "Now Showing: Declining Sales at Theater Snack Bars," March 18: Instead of telling the public how wonderful it is to see a movie on the big screen (as it did during the Oscar telecast), the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences should shout to the theater owners to lower their prices. Sharon Beirdneau Mission Viejo
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