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NEWS
December 26, 1986
Analysis of shock waves from tests on the Arctic island of Novaya Zemlya indicates that the explosive force of the Soviet Union's most powerful strategic weapons may be one-third to one-half less than published estimates derived from military sources, two seismic experts said. The finding indicates that U.S. silo-based missiles may be less vulnerable to a Soviet missile attack than commonly thought, Lynn R. Sykes of Columbia University and Dan M.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2005 | From Associated Press
Dennis Flanagan, longtime editor of Scientific American magazine who helped introduce lay readers to complex scientific issues, has died. He was 85. Flanagan, who worked at the magazine more than three decades, beginning in 1947, died of prostate cancer Jan. 11 at his New York City home. At Scientific American, Flanagan published pieces from leading figures such as Albert Einstein, Linus Pauling and J. Robert Oppenheimer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gerard Piel, 89, the former publisher of Scientific American magazine who oversaw a dramatic upswing in the periodical's fortunes, died Sunday at a hospital in Queens, N.Y., of complications from a stroke, his family said. Piel and several associates bought Scientific American in 1947 during a lull in its popularity. He oversaw several years of reforms, including having scientists write articles about their research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gerard Piel, 89, the former publisher of Scientific American magazine who oversaw a dramatic upswing in the periodical's fortunes, died Sunday at a hospital in Queens, N.Y., of complications from a stroke, his family said. Piel and several associates bought Scientific American in 1947 during a lull in its popularity. He oversaw several years of reforms, including having scientists write articles about their research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2005 | From Associated Press
Dennis Flanagan, longtime editor of Scientific American magazine who helped introduce lay readers to complex scientific issues, has died. He was 85. Flanagan, who worked at the magazine more than three decades, beginning in 1947, died of prostate cancer Jan. 11 at his New York City home. At Scientific American, Flanagan published pieces from leading figures such as Albert Einstein, Linus Pauling and J. Robert Oppenheimer.
NEWS
August 14, 1985
A U.S.-Soviet halt in production of uranium and plutonium for atomic weapons was proposed in a Scientific American magazine article by three Princeton University physicists, who said modern techniques to catch cheating make the idea feasible. The United States has not produced such materials since 1964, relying on a large stockpile and recycled warheads, but President Reagan has proposed resuming production. Moscow has repeatedly rejected U.S.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1986
According to the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science and Time Inc. sources, Time offered about $5 million for the award-winning but money-losing magazine. In addition to Time, Life, Fortune and other publications, Time Inc. publishes Discover--also an award-winning but money-losing magazine in the troubled science magazine field. The company is also reportedly seeking to buy Scientific American magazine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1997
Science constantly comes up with little wonders as well as grand ones. Consider this from the current issue of Scientific American magazine: Murphy's Law is more than just a joke. There is evidence that some little things in life go wrong for a rational reason, not just because life is cruel. As commonly known, Murphy's Law states that if anything can go wrong, it will. One example given by the author of the article, Robert A.J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1985
Elliot L. Richardson's article (Editorial Pages, July 25), "Let's Redouble Non-Proliferation Efforts," is not convincing. The real issue before the signatories to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons at their meeting later this month in Geneva--the third since the treaty was ratified by the United States in 1970--is not arms proliferation, but arms reductions until the last nuclear warhead has been dismantled. Article VI of the treaty calls for negotiations "in good faith" looking to "nuclear disarmament" and a treaty "on general and complete disarmament under strict and effective international control."
HOME & GARDEN
May 13, 2000 | KATHY BRYANT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
WHAT IS IT? This is a 2 1/2-inch-by-3 1/2-inch miniature watercolor portrait of Sarah Bartlett, a granddaughter of Josiah Bartlett, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. On the backing, the artist has signed his name: Rufus Porter. The date of the portrait on the back states 1825. WHAT'S ITS HISTORY?
NEWS
December 26, 1986
Analysis of shock waves from tests on the Arctic island of Novaya Zemlya indicates that the explosive force of the Soviet Union's most powerful strategic weapons may be one-third to one-half less than published estimates derived from military sources, two seismic experts said. The finding indicates that U.S. silo-based missiles may be less vulnerable to a Soviet missile attack than commonly thought, Lynn R. Sykes of Columbia University and Dan M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2005 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Judith Rossner, the best-selling novelist whose "Looking for Mr. Goodbar" was made into a popular movie, died Tuesday in New York City, according to her husband, Stanley Leff. She was 70. Rossner died at NYU Medical Center of complications from diabetes and leukemia, her husband said Wednesday.
NEWS
July 20, 1995 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Mark Jennings, a biologist with the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, can remember the exact day when, as a boy growing up in Ventura County, he found his first yellow-legged frog in Santa Paula Creek near his home. That was in May, 1970, and when he returns these days to visit his parents in Santa Paula, he still goes looking for those frogs. Only there aren't any more. "When you walked the creek then, you saw foothill yellow-legged frogs sunning themselves.
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