Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsScientific Community
IN THE NEWS

Scientific Community

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
November 24, 2009 | By David Masci
Today, a century and a half after Charles Darwin published "On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection," the overwhelming majority of scientists in the United States accept Darwinian evolution as the basis for understanding how life on Earth developed. But although evolutionary theory is often portrayed as antithetical to religion, it has not destroyed the religious faith of the scientific community. According to a survey of members of the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science, conducted by the Pew Research Center in May and June this year, a majority of scientists (51%)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 2, 2012 | By Sara Lessley
“Conservatives lose faith in science,” trumpeted the headline on a story in last week's Times.   “A study … in the American Sociological Review concludes that trust in science among conservatives and frequent churchgoers has declined precipitously since 1974, when a national survey first asked people how much confidence they had in the scientific community. At that time, conservatives had the highest level of trust in scientists.” Though the article ran inside the paper on a weekday, it certainly didn't go unseen by Times letter writers.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 15, 2005
Regarding "The Fleeting Lives of Pronghorns" [Nov. 8], I agree that the public (and sometimes the scientific community) will champion the plight of an exotic or popular species over that of a lesser-known but equally deserving local species. Unfortunately, the theme park mentality exists. STAN MIYAWAKI Santa Monica I haven't seen antelope on California highways, but in September we saw some in Wyoming, along highways 287 and 80. We spotted them running both close to the road and off in the distance.
NATIONAL
September 30, 2010 | By Neela Banerjee, Tribune Washington Bureau
BP and the governors of the five Gulf Coast states announced plans Wednesday to funnel a promised $500 million in research funds through an organization run by the governors, not the nation's scientific community. As word leaked out before the announcement that politicians would have considerable control over the BP research money, scientists voiced fears that most of the grants would be doled out to institutions in the governors' home states, raising the possibility of pork-barrel projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1987
Our thanks to the unbiased and refreshing observations of Nord in the center of the creation controversy. The closed minds of some in the scientific community to which he refers would have us believe that "the heavens declare the glory and the firmament shows the handiwork of blind chance." Are we to accept as true that "blind chance" is responsible for the incredible design and unique provisions, which make it possible not only for scientists but for all of us to enjoy life on this earth?
OPINION
February 14, 2002
The trend toward secrecy in science today is frightening ("Scientists Sharing Fewer Discoveries," Feb. 11). More than ever we need openness to protect our Earth. With corporations fudging on the benefits and safety of their products by their researchers, the scientific community needs the freedom and the dialogue necessary to make decisions for our own health and welfare as well as the health and welfare of our world. Nature's laws don't change, only our understanding of them. There is no back-up planet.
OPINION
January 12, 2007
Re "Have another burger," editorial, Jan. 6 In mystifying fashion, The Times acknowledges that cloning animals results in a higher rate of deformities and early deaths, then defends the practice anyway. In a culture that relies on cruel factory farms, this fact is merely a blip on the paper's moral radar. As long as the end product doesn't harm human health, any harm to animals is apparently irrelevant. To say nothing of whether organic, hormone-free meat and dairy products are healthier, they are almost always produced in a manner that is vastly more humane compared with mainstream livestock production, which annually results in the outright torture of millions of cows, chickens and pigs in the name of cheap meat.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1994 | Anne Michaud, Times staff writer
SPI Turns to PR: SPI Pharmaceuticals in Costa Mesa said Wednesday it has hired public relations agency Edelman Medical Communications of New York to give its products higher visibility in the scientific community. In particular, SPI said, it wants to promote its leading drug, Virazole.
NEWS
April 15, 1990
Congratulations to The Times for running such an incisive, informative article on Paul Ehrlich and his new book, "The Population Explosion." Thanks to The Times, we know Ehrlich is one of the most dangerous men in America. Ehrlich is a social engineer. His efforts to "reprogram consciousness," to prescribe "politically correct" responses to people who have large families, and to decry affluent people whose "children take a greater toll on the environment than children of poor parents" smack of the old Stalinist totalitarian nightmares Orwell described so pungently.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1990
Regarding the June 10 Commentary by Lyn Greene, "Bay Health Controversy Surfaces Again": I would like to point out that nearly all pollution problems of regional significance are of an inter-jurisdictional, and thus, controversial nature. The problems associated with any body of water as large as our San Diego Bay receiving a diverse range of pollutants will not be resolved through consensus within the scientific community. Science is based on critical thought, controversy and the quest for a more complete understanding of what is termed "knowledge."
WORLD
February 24, 2010 | By Mark Magnier
More violence this week in Thailand's restive southern provinces has intensified the controversy in the country over a bomb detector that critics call ineffective. Seven soldiers were injured Tuesday in two bombings, one involving a unit protecting teachers, the other targeting a truck on patrol. These attacks followed a roadside bomb blast Monday that wounded two soldiers. The attacks in a region with a long-running Muslim insurgency follow weeks of debate by government officials, human rights groups, army brass and scientific experts over the effectiveness of the British-made GT200 wand after a BBC expose last month found it wanting.
OPINION
November 24, 2009 | By David Masci
Today, a century and a half after Charles Darwin published "On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection," the overwhelming majority of scientists in the United States accept Darwinian evolution as the basis for understanding how life on Earth developed. But although evolutionary theory is often portrayed as antithetical to religion, it has not destroyed the religious faith of the scientific community. According to a survey of members of the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science, conducted by the Pew Research Center in May and June this year, a majority of scientists (51%)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2008 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
In the beginning, there was the Professor. Though he never could figure out how to repair the S.S. Minnow, Russell Johnson's high school science teacher, stranded with the other castaways on "Gilligan's Island," was so ingenious he could re-charge a battery using only bamboo and coconuts, so morbidly cerebral it never occurred to him that he was the most likely mate for Ginger and Mary Ann.
OPINION
March 29, 2007
Re "Why the GOP goes nuclear over global warming," Opinion, March 25 I have a message for House Republican leader John Boehner of Ohio and others who are denying seats on the Select Committee on Energy Independence and Global Warming to members who refuse to deny that humans have contributed to global warming, which flies in the face of reputable science: You're over. We are sick of this kind of censorship. We are fed up with stonewalling on major issues that greatly concern the American people, such as Iraq, the minimum wage, immigration and the environment.
OPINION
January 12, 2007
Re "Have another burger," editorial, Jan. 6 In mystifying fashion, The Times acknowledges that cloning animals results in a higher rate of deformities and early deaths, then defends the practice anyway. In a culture that relies on cruel factory farms, this fact is merely a blip on the paper's moral radar. As long as the end product doesn't harm human health, any harm to animals is apparently irrelevant. To say nothing of whether organic, hormone-free meat and dairy products are healthier, they are almost always produced in a manner that is vastly more humane compared with mainstream livestock production, which annually results in the outright torture of millions of cows, chickens and pigs in the name of cheap meat.
NEWS
November 15, 2005
Regarding "The Fleeting Lives of Pronghorns" [Nov. 8], I agree that the public (and sometimes the scientific community) will champion the plight of an exotic or popular species over that of a lesser-known but equally deserving local species. Unfortunately, the theme park mentality exists. STAN MIYAWAKI Santa Monica I haven't seen antelope on California highways, but in September we saw some in Wyoming, along highways 287 and 80. We spotted them running both close to the road and off in the distance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1991
When Hugh Hewitt wrote his piece on the gnatcatcher controversy, he must not have realized how absurd his rhetoric would seem placed next to fellow attorney Joel Reynolds' carefully wrought position (Commentaries, "Gnatcatcher: Imperiled Species or Specious No-Growth Ploy?" July 28). Reynolds' arguments rely heavily on prevailing opinion in the legitimate scientific community. By contrast, Hewitt relies instead on the incredible claim that the whole scientific community arrayed against him is engaged in a diabolic cabal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1997
Regarding "World Views on Global Warming Are Worlds Apart," Oct. 5: I applaud The Times for coverage of the debate over global climate change. In the attempt to portray the scope of the debate and the complexity of the scientific issues involved, however, your story curiously fails to report the broad scientific consensus on the subject. The 1995 report that is fleetingly mentioned was compiled by the world's preeminent climate scientists, and concluded that there is a discernible impact of human activities on climate.
OPINION
February 16, 2003
At least Michael Gilmore admits what many of us have long suspected -- Darwinians are just as religious as anyone ("Feeling at Home in a Scientific World," Commentary, Feb. 11). He waxes poetic about finding a "true religious sense" in evolution, in a blind universe where we can be "star stuff contemplating star stuff." I'm sorry if I'm not moved by that. Darwinism is a religion with a profoundly empty source. The supposed "facts" of purposeless descent are being increasingly exposed as fallacious.
OPINION
February 14, 2002
The trend toward secrecy in science today is frightening ("Scientists Sharing Fewer Discoveries," Feb. 11). More than ever we need openness to protect our Earth. With corporations fudging on the benefits and safety of their products by their researchers, the scientific community needs the freedom and the dialogue necessary to make decisions for our own health and welfare as well as the health and welfare of our world. Nature's laws don't change, only our understanding of them. There is no back-up planet.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|