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Scientific Computer Systems Corp

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BUSINESS
March 30, 1989 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
Scientific Computer Systems, a manufacturer of mini-supercomputers, has made the painful discovery that building a better mousetrap doesn't always attract a world of customers to your doorstep. Earlier this month, Scientific Computer discontinued its mini-supercomputer, the technical features of which had been lauded by industry observers. The announcement put an end to an effort that consumed 5 years and $50 million in venture capital and caused layoffs of 70 of the company's 100 employees.
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BUSINESS
March 30, 1989 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
Scientific Computer Systems, a manufacturer of mini-supercomputers, has made the painful discovery that building a better mousetrap doesn't always attract a world of customers to your doorstep. Earlier this month, Scientific Computer discontinued its mini-supercomputer, the technical features of which had been lauded by industry observers. The announcement put an end to an effort that consumed 5 years and $50 million in venture capital and caused layoffs of 70 of the company's 100 employees.
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BUSINESS
January 15, 1987
Bruce Edwards has been named new chief financial officer of Scientific Computer Systems Corp., a San Diego-based designer and manufacturer of mini-supercomputers. Edwards had been vice president and chief financial officer of AST, an Irvine-based computer products manufacturer.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1990
Barry Rosenbaum has joined Active Memory Technology Inc. as president and chief executive officer. He succeeds Geoff Manning, who will serve as chairman. Previously, Rosenbaum was president and chief executive officer of Scientific Computer Systems Corp. in San Diego. He was also a founder of Convex Computer Corp. in Richardson, Tex., and held marketing and sales-management positions with Perkin-Elmer Corp. and computer systems engineering positions with Honeywell Inc.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1988 | From Reuters
American makers of supercomputers, sophisticated number crunchers capable of lightning-fast calculations, are again gearing for a crack at the Japanese market. But while U.S. machines may have an edge in terms of software availability, competing with cutthroat Japanese price policies is likely to be tough, industry analysts said. Five makers of supercomputers and mini-supercomputers, with support from the U.S.
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