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Scientific Consensus

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2011 | By Margot Roosevelt, Los Angeles Times
A team of UC Berkeley physicists and statisticians that set out to challenge the scientific consensus on global warming is finding that its data-crunching effort is producing results nearly identical to those underlying the prevailing view. The Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature project was launched by physics professor Richard Muller, a longtime critic of government-led climate studies, to address what he called "the legitimate concerns" of skeptics who believe that global warming is exaggerated.
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NATIONAL
December 20, 2012 | By James Rainey, Los Angeles Times
Two governors, a congressman, various state legislators and a host of conservative commentators joined the chief executive of the Gun Owners of America this week in suggesting that the country needs more guns, in the right hands, to prevent mass murders like the one at a Connecticut elementary school. Such opinions strike many blue-state Americans as absurd. Gun control advocates often cite studies showing higher rates of suicide and homicide in firearms-permissive cultures, with strikingly lower rates in nations with strict controls on weapons.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1997
The recommendation Sunday from the American Cancer Society that women in their 40s undergo routine annual mammograms presages a similar advisory expected to be announced Thursday by the National Cancer Institute. Coming from the nation's two most influential cancer policymaking bodies, these recommendations reflect a new and strong scientific consensus.
OPINION
September 9, 2011
Not all Republicans are stuck in the Middle Ages when it comes to attitudes about science. At the party's presidential debate Wednesday night in Simi Valley, Jon Huntsman Jr. showed that at least some of the candidates have advanced past the Enlightenment era. "Listen, when you make comments that fly in the face of what 98 out of 100 climate scientists have said, when you call into question the science of evolution, all I'm saying is that, in...
NEWS
January 2, 1992
Your profile of Heal the Bay's Mark Gold (Times, Dec. 26) was a well-deserved compliment to Gold. In addition to demonstrated leadership on the Santa Monica Bay Restoration Project Management Committee, Gold has (in my opinion) restored much credibility to the reputation of Heal the Bay, since that infamous Regional Water Quality Control Board hearing at which environmentalist Donald May paraded jars of sewage sludge before TV news cameras, warning of impending doom from the county's sewage treatment plant (Mr. May is now crying wolf about the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station)
OPINION
January 3, 2009
Christine Maggiore, who was diagnosed with HIV in 1992, waged a long, bitter campaign denouncing the prevailing scientific wisdom on the causes and treatment of AIDS. She fiercely contested the overwhelming consensus that the HIV virus causes AIDS, and that preventive approaches and antiretrovirals can help thwart the disease's spread and prolong the lives of those who suffer from it. Her campaign ended this week with her death at age 52.
OPINION
September 9, 2011
Not all Republicans are stuck in the Middle Ages when it comes to attitudes about science. At the party's presidential debate Wednesday night in Simi Valley, Jon Huntsman Jr. showed that at least some of the candidates have advanced past the Enlightenment era. "Listen, when you make comments that fly in the face of what 98 out of 100 climate scientists have said, when you call into question the science of evolution, all I'm saying is that, in...
OPINION
December 12, 2009 | Tim Rutten
It wasn't very long ago that a dinner party guest who wanted to spare the hostess any embarrassing contention simply avoided discussing religion or politics and stuck to the weather. Not anymore. In fact, it says something unutterably depressing about the state of the nation that we've finally managed to politicize even the climate. Take, for example, the controversy that erupted on the eve of the global climate conference in Copenhagen, when hackers skeptical about global warming stole and released e-mails and documents from computers at the Climatic Research Unit at the University of East Anglia in Britain.
SCIENCE
March 13, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II and Andrew Zajac
The federal "vaccines court" ruled Friday in three separate cases that the mercury-containing preservative thimerosal does not cause autism, a finding that supports the broad scientific consensus on the matter but that greatly disappointed parents who are convinced that their child's illness was caused by vaccines. The court had ruled 13 months ago that a combination of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, commonly known as the MMR vaccine, and thimerosal does not cause the disorder, so the new ruling may finally close the bulk of litigation on the matter.
NATIONAL
December 20, 2012 | By James Rainey, Los Angeles Times
Two governors, a congressman, various state legislators and a host of conservative commentators joined the chief executive of the Gun Owners of America this week in suggesting that the country needs more guns, in the right hands, to prevent mass murders like the one at a Connecticut elementary school. Such opinions strike many blue-state Americans as absurd. Gun control advocates often cite studies showing higher rates of suicide and homicide in firearms-permissive cultures, with strikingly lower rates in nations with strict controls on weapons.
OPINION
August 11, 2011
Former President Bush had a nasty tendency to put politics ahead of science; one of the more flagrant examples of this occurred in 2008, when the Environmental Protection Agency set a weaker standard on ozone, the key ingredient in smog, than the agency's scientific advisory panel had unanimously recommended. President Obama arrived in office the following year promising to rescue us from such dangerous interference. So what is Obama doing about the smog problem? Apparently, putting politics ahead of science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2011 | By Margot Roosevelt, Los Angeles Times
A team of UC Berkeley physicists and statisticians that set out to challenge the scientific consensus on global warming is finding that its data-crunching effort is producing results nearly identical to those underlying the prevailing view. The Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature project was launched by physics professor Richard Muller, a longtime critic of government-led climate studies, to address what he called "the legitimate concerns" of skeptics who believe that global warming is exaggerated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2010 | By Maria L. La Ganga, Los Angeles Times
The San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to make the city the nation's first to require that retailers post cellphone radiation levels prominently in their stores. The cellphone right-to-know ordinance, which passed 9 to 1, arose out of officials' concerns about possible long-term health effects of using the ubiquitous gadgets, even though there is no scientific consensus regarding their potential danger. "Government agencies and scientific bodies in the European Union and Israel have recognized the potential harm of long-term exposure" to radiation from cellphones and have issued warnings about their use, especially by children, the ordinance states.
SCIENCE
March 13, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II and Andrew Zajac
The federal "vaccines court" ruled Friday in three separate cases that the mercury-containing preservative thimerosal does not cause autism, a finding that supports the broad scientific consensus on the matter but that greatly disappointed parents who are convinced that their child's illness was caused by vaccines. The court had ruled 13 months ago that a combination of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, commonly known as the MMR vaccine, and thimerosal does not cause the disorder, so the new ruling may finally close the bulk of litigation on the matter.
OPINION
December 12, 2009 | Tim Rutten
It wasn't very long ago that a dinner party guest who wanted to spare the hostess any embarrassing contention simply avoided discussing religion or politics and stuck to the weather. Not anymore. In fact, it says something unutterably depressing about the state of the nation that we've finally managed to politicize even the climate. Take, for example, the controversy that erupted on the eve of the global climate conference in Copenhagen, when hackers skeptical about global warming stole and released e-mails and documents from computers at the Climatic Research Unit at the University of East Anglia in Britain.
NATIONAL
August 25, 2009 | Jim Tankersley
The nation's largest business lobby wants to put the science of global warming on trial. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, trying to ward off potentially sweeping federal emissions regulations, is pushing the Environmental Protection Agency to hold a rare public hearing on the scientific evidence for man-made climate change. Chamber officials say it would be "the Scopes monkey trial of the 21st century" -- complete with witnesses, cross-examinations and a judge who would rule, essentially, on whether humans are warming the planet to dangerous effect.
OPINION
August 11, 2011
Former President Bush had a nasty tendency to put politics ahead of science; one of the more flagrant examples of this occurred in 2008, when the Environmental Protection Agency set a weaker standard on ozone, the key ingredient in smog, than the agency's scientific advisory panel had unanimously recommended. President Obama arrived in office the following year promising to rescue us from such dangerous interference. So what is Obama doing about the smog problem? Apparently, putting politics ahead of science.
NATIONAL
August 25, 2009 | Jim Tankersley
The nation's largest business lobby wants to put the science of global warming on trial. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, trying to ward off potentially sweeping federal emissions regulations, is pushing the Environmental Protection Agency to hold a rare public hearing on the scientific evidence for man-made climate change. Chamber officials say it would be "the Scopes monkey trial of the 21st century" -- complete with witnesses, cross-examinations and a judge who would rule, essentially, on whether humans are warming the planet to dangerous effect.
OPINION
January 3, 2009
Christine Maggiore, who was diagnosed with HIV in 1992, waged a long, bitter campaign denouncing the prevailing scientific wisdom on the causes and treatment of AIDS. She fiercely contested the overwhelming consensus that the HIV virus causes AIDS, and that preventive approaches and antiretrovirals can help thwart the disease's spread and prolong the lives of those who suffer from it. Her campaign ended this week with her death at age 52.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1997
The recommendation Sunday from the American Cancer Society that women in their 40s undergo routine annual mammograms presages a similar advisory expected to be announced Thursday by the National Cancer Institute. Coming from the nation's two most influential cancer policymaking bodies, these recommendations reflect a new and strong scientific consensus.
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