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BUSINESS
May 20, 2000
* Bookseller Borders Group Inc. said its fiscal first-quarter loss widened to $900,000, or 1 cent a share, in line with estimates, from a loss of $700,000, or 1 cent, a year ago, on spending to build its Internet site. Sales were up 10% to $680.9 million. The Internet unit lost 6 cents a share, while its sales rose 66% to $5.3 million. The company said its Waldenbooks stores and international operations lost money, while its larger Borders book and music stores were profitable. * Autotote Corp.
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NEWS
June 6, 1985
Scientific Games Inc. unveiled the nation's highest-volume lottery ticket factory, which it secretly began building in Gilroy five months before it could bid on the contract to supply tickets for California's games. Though the Georgia-based company won the $40-million contract, its $6-million, high-security printing plant remains tangled in lawsuits that may prevent the facility from producing tickets.
SPORTS
October 3, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The U.S. Olympic Committee is turning to state lotteries as a source of funding, one that could generate as much as $25 million by 1996, the New York Times reported. Scientific Games, the USOC's partner in the new deal, already has signed 15 states that have agreed to buy 378-million tickets for the instant-win scratch-off game, the newspaper reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1986
Scientific Games Inc., which had been given until Friday to fire a Georgia printing subcontractor found guilty of fraud or lose its contract to supply $32 million in California Lottery tickets, won a brief extension as the clock ran out. Lottery Director Mark Michalko announced late Friday that he was acceding to the request by Scientific Games to postpone the deadline until after a Monday hearing in Georgia on whether the firm may legally sever its contract with Dittler Bros., the printer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1986 | ERIC MALNIC, Times Staff Writer
A Georgia firm won a major victory Friday when it recaptured part of the ticket-printing contract with the California Lottery that had been rescinded over a legal dispute. Lottery Director Mark Michalko, acting under emergency provisions approved by the California Lottery Commission last week, awarded a stopgap, $3.5-million contract to Scientific Games Inc.
NEWS
June 26, 1986 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
The state Wednesday stopped buying lottery tickets from Scientific Games Inc., the company that bankrolled the lottery initiative and then was the only successful bidder for the initial $40-million contract to supply tickets for the "scratch-off" ticket game. State Lottery Director M.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2000
* Bookseller Borders Group Inc. said its fiscal first-quarter loss widened to $900,000, or 1 cent a share, in line with estimates, from a loss of $700,000, or 1 cent, a year ago, on spending to build its Internet site. Sales were up 10% to $680.9 million. The Internet unit lost 6 cents a share, while its sales rose 66% to $5.3 million. The company said its Waldenbooks stores and international operations lost money, while its larger Borders book and music stores were profitable. * Autotote Corp.
SPORTS
October 3, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The U.S. Olympic Committee is turning to state lotteries as a source of funding, one that could generate as much as $25 million by 1996, the New York Times reported. Scientific Games, the USOC's partner in the new deal, already has signed 15 states that have agreed to buy 378-million tickets for the instant-win scratch-off game, the newspaper reported.
NEWS
March 1, 1991 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Lottery is hoping to milk a cash cow named Spot for about $58 million. Spot is the comely Holstein on the lottery's new scratcher ticket, Moo-La Mania. For $1 a pop, bettors rub off miniature milk bottles to spell out C-O-W and win from $2 to $10,000. But she is no common pasture variety cow. Spot's a very California cow, peering through mirror sunglasses and munching dollar bills.
NEWS
March 1, 1991 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Lottery is hoping to milk a cash cow named Spot for about $58 million. Spot is the comely Holstein on the lottery's new scratcher ticket, Moo-La Mania. For $1 a pop, bettors rub off miniature milk bottles to spell out C-O-W and win from $2 to $10,000. But she is no common pasture variety cow. Spot's a very California cow, peering through mirror sunglasses and munching dollar bills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1986 | ERIC MALNIC, Times Staff Writer
A Georgia firm won a major victory Friday when it recaptured part of the ticket-printing contract with the California Lottery that had been rescinded over a legal dispute. Lottery Director Mark Michalko, acting under emergency provisions approved by the California Lottery Commission last week, awarded a stopgap, $3.5-million contract to Scientific Games Inc.
NEWS
June 26, 1986 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
The state Wednesday stopped buying lottery tickets from Scientific Games Inc., the company that bankrolled the lottery initiative and then was the only successful bidder for the initial $40-million contract to supply tickets for the "scratch-off" ticket game. State Lottery Director M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1986
Scientific Games Inc., which had been given until Friday to fire a Georgia printing subcontractor found guilty of fraud or lose its contract to supply $32 million in California Lottery tickets, won a brief extension as the clock ran out. Lottery Director Mark Michalko announced late Friday that he was acceding to the request by Scientific Games to postpone the deadline until after a Monday hearing in Georgia on whether the firm may legally sever its contract with Dittler Bros., the printer.
NEWS
June 6, 1985
Scientific Games Inc. unveiled the nation's highest-volume lottery ticket factory, which it secretly began building in Gilroy five months before it could bid on the contract to supply tickets for California's games. Though the Georgia-based company won the $40-million contract, its $6-million, high-security printing plant remains tangled in lawsuits that may prevent the facility from producing tickets.
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