Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsScientific Literacy
IN THE NEWS

Scientific Literacy

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
July 21, 1996
In the essay "Measuring Political Correctness" (Commentary, July 12), Mark Hartwig argues that the question, "Do you think that human beings, as we know them today, developed from earlier species of animals?" posed in the National Science Foundation survey of scientific literacy "was most likely designed to label unbelievers as scientifically illiterate." There is no issue here. Someone who answers no is scientifically illiterate. What if the questions were, "Do you think that Earth revolves around the sun?"
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
"It's time to get going again. " With these words, host and astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson kicks off the new documentary series, "Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey. " Premiering on Fox, the National Geographic Channel and eight other affiliated networks Sunday night, it is a follow-up to "Cosmos: A Personal Voyage," the groundbreaking and hugely popular 1980 PBS series hosted by astronomer Carl Sagan. Tyson, strolling along the scenic California coastal cliffs of Monterey - just as Sagan did in the opening minutes of the original - is talking about bringing the franchise to a new generation, but with a command that can also be interpreted as a mission statement.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
January 21, 1990
Congratulations to Schrage for his incisive column on the politics and marketing of scientific models. While supercomputers and sophisticated mathematics are without doubt advancing our understanding of nature's complexity, Schrage rightly points out the danger of having important policy decisions swayed by salesmen posing as scientists. His observations speak strongly for the crucial need to raise the general scientific literacy of our society. With current supercomputers, numerical modeling is being actively applied in fields from physics to chemistry to economics.
OPINION
April 1, 2012
With so many scientific issues becoming battlefields in the culture wars - from climate change to stem-cell research to evolution (see above) - we hardly needed a new study to tell us that scientists have become a favorite target of the right. Yet a paper written by University of North Carolina doctoral fellow Gordon Gauchat and published last week in the American Sociological Review also contains a highly counterintuitive finding. Common sense, as well as past research, suggests that distrust of science correlates with lack of education; the less education a person has, the more likely he or she will favor traditional beliefs or religious dogma over scientific evidence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1994
Our students deserve our elected officials' support of the metric system. U.S. students and eventually everyone will be better off as a result of the switch. Education in this country seems to be continually under fire for a variety of reasons. One such reason is the degree of technical literacy achieved by most of our students compared with students of other countries. Currently U.S. students spend time learning "scientific" units, such as the meter, liter, kilogram and degrees Celsius.
NEWS
June 3, 2002 | BART KOSKO, Bart Kosko is a professor of electrical engineering at USC.
Most adults missed something in the films "Star Wars" and "Goldfinger" because, according to a new National Science Foundation study, only 45% know that lasers focus light waves rather than sound waves. That finding bodes well for more junk science in the courtroom. The recent NSF study found that overall scientific literacy in the United States remained fairly low; only 54% of adults know it takes the Earth one year to orbit the sun. The study also found that belief in pseudoscience continued to rise: Even though no scientific evidence supports astrologers' claims, a full 41% of adults believe that astrology is somewhat scientific.
OPINION
April 1, 2012
With so many scientific issues becoming battlefields in the culture wars - from climate change to stem-cell research to evolution (see above) - we hardly needed a new study to tell us that scientists have become a favorite target of the right. Yet a paper written by University of North Carolina doctoral fellow Gordon Gauchat and published last week in the American Sociological Review also contains a highly counterintuitive finding. Common sense, as well as past research, suggests that distrust of science correlates with lack of education; the less education a person has, the more likely he or she will favor traditional beliefs or religious dogma over scientific evidence.
NEWS
March 31, 1989 | Isaac Asimov
For a long time now, scientists have been concerned about the low level of scientific and mathematical instruction in American schools. Recent reports in 1988 and 1989 are unanimous in indicating not only that American students are scientifically and mathematically illiterate, but that they are more so than students in any other industrial society studied. This is depressing in the extreme. The United States is the scientific leader of the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2014 | By Meredith Blake
"It's time to get going again. " With these words, host and astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson kicks off the new documentary series, "Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey. " Premiering on Fox, the National Geographic Channel and eight other affiliated networks Sunday night, it is a follow-up to "Cosmos: A Personal Voyage," the groundbreaking and hugely popular 1980 PBS series hosted by astronomer Carl Sagan. Tyson, strolling along the scenic California coastal cliffs of Monterey - just as Sagan did in the opening minutes of the original - is talking about bringing the franchise to a new generation, but with a command that can also be interpreted as a mission statement.
NEWS
June 3, 2002 | BART KOSKO, Bart Kosko is a professor of electrical engineering at USC.
Most adults missed something in the films "Star Wars" and "Goldfinger" because, according to a new National Science Foundation study, only 45% know that lasers focus light waves rather than sound waves. That finding bodes well for more junk science in the courtroom. The recent NSF study found that overall scientific literacy in the United States remained fairly low; only 54% of adults know it takes the Earth one year to orbit the sun. The study also found that belief in pseudoscience continued to rise: Even though no scientific evidence supports astrologers' claims, a full 41% of adults believe that astrology is somewhat scientific.
OPINION
July 21, 1996
In the essay "Measuring Political Correctness" (Commentary, July 12), Mark Hartwig argues that the question, "Do you think that human beings, as we know them today, developed from earlier species of animals?" posed in the National Science Foundation survey of scientific literacy "was most likely designed to label unbelievers as scientifically illiterate." There is no issue here. Someone who answers no is scientifically illiterate. What if the questions were, "Do you think that Earth revolves around the sun?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1994
Our students deserve our elected officials' support of the metric system. U.S. students and eventually everyone will be better off as a result of the switch. Education in this country seems to be continually under fire for a variety of reasons. One such reason is the degree of technical literacy achieved by most of our students compared with students of other countries. Currently U.S. students spend time learning "scientific" units, such as the meter, liter, kilogram and degrees Celsius.
BUSINESS
January 21, 1990
Congratulations to Schrage for his incisive column on the politics and marketing of scientific models. While supercomputers and sophisticated mathematics are without doubt advancing our understanding of nature's complexity, Schrage rightly points out the danger of having important policy decisions swayed by salesmen posing as scientists. His observations speak strongly for the crucial need to raise the general scientific literacy of our society. With current supercomputers, numerical modeling is being actively applied in fields from physics to chemistry to economics.
NEWS
March 31, 1989 | Isaac Asimov
For a long time now, scientists have been concerned about the low level of scientific and mathematical instruction in American schools. Recent reports in 1988 and 1989 are unanimous in indicating not only that American students are scientifically and mathematically illiterate, but that they are more so than students in any other industrial society studied. This is depressing in the extreme. The United States is the scientific leader of the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1988 | MADELINE LANDAU, Madeline Landau is a research affiliate of the Institute of Governmental Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, which recently published her study of organizational weaknesses in national social policy formation. She also has taught federal policy and urban politics at Berkeley and at Stanford University
In Tuesday night's 90-minute interview with Ted Koppel, Michael Dukakis lost a singular opportunity to redefine the terms of this presidential election. The fault was not Dukakis' as much as the nature of Koppel's questions. Many of them reflected core assumptions that have become silent articles of faith through unchallenged repetition over the past eight years of Republican leadership.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|