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July 1, 1990 | ETHAN CANIN
I WAS AN INSECT COLLECTOR and was learning from my brother Lawrence to worship the scientific method. In grammar school I made a project of pinning the insects I scooped from the molding pile of grass and leaves in the yard next door to our house. Hundreds of earwigs and silverfish and slate-gray potato bugs scrambled in the glovesful of dirt I lifted from the pile and then sorted over a mayonnaise jar behind the back porch.
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SCIENCE
April 1, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Happy April Fool's Day! Why not celebrate with a little humor from the world of science? No, that's not an April Fool's joke. It really IS possible to blend humor with science and math. The American Chemical Society proves it in the video above. You may find some of the jokes funnier than others. One of my favorites: “Never trust an atom - they make up everything.” There's another gem about two glasses of water concerned about the too-cool-for-school behavior of their ice-cube son. The punch line requires a junior-high understanding of chemistry.
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NEWS
January 7, 1992 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not the first time the berobed Maharishi has bumped heads with the gurus of modern American medicine, but never before have they collided with such enthusiasm and velocity. In one corner, the followers of Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, who, with a little help from his friends the Beatles, brought us Transcendental Meditation. In the other corner, the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Assn., which every week reports the latest in medical research. Welcome to medicine-for-a-new-millenium.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
It's the first rule of thumb for any aspiring UFO investigator: Keep an open mind. "We all want to believe, we all want to believe bad," said David MacDonald, a certified investigator with the Mutual UFO Network. "But you've got to look at the evidence. You've got to come at this like a scientific researcher. " On Friday, MacDonald and dozens of like-minded individuals filled an Irvine hotel conference room to discuss the finer points of investigating the inexplicable — or at least that which cannot be explained in terrestrial terms.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1997
Samuel D. Isaly has racked up an impressive record investing in the health-care sector. His Eaton Vance Worldwide Health Sciences fund, which he has managed since 1989, gained 131% in the five years ended Dec. 31, compared with 72% for the average health-care fund and 92% for the average U.S. stock fund. Isaly typically keeps 60% to 80% of assets invested in biotech stocks and specialty health-care firms.
SCIENCE
April 1, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Happy April Fool's Day! Why not celebrate with a little humor from the world of science? No, that's not an April Fool's joke. It really IS possible to blend humor with science and math. The American Chemical Society proves it in the video above. You may find some of the jokes funnier than others. One of my favorites: “Never trust an atom - they make up everything.” There's another gem about two glasses of water concerned about the too-cool-for-school behavior of their ice-cube son. The punch line requires a junior-high understanding of chemistry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1991
Capistrano Valley High School biology teacher John Peloza would have us believe that the theory of evolution is merely the latest "politically correct" dogma and not a viable scientific principle. But when Charles Darwin published his "Origin of Species" in 1859, it was after 20 years of studying the findings of his Beagle voyage. Since that day, the fossil record has expanded a thousandfold; entirely new fields have arisen within the biological sciences, such as genetics; reliable methods have been discovered for dating rocks and organic materials.
OPINION
December 2, 2006
Re "Fundamentalism for adults only," Current, Nov. 26 Michael Bywater wrongly blames science for the deficiencies of those who do not understand it. He claims that science includes "articles of faith," when in fact it deals exclusively with logic and mathematically quantifiable confidence. He tries to equate religion and science, but only the latter necessarily shows its work. Bywater characterizes religion as a "valid way of thinking," though logical validity entails truth preservation, which faith does not. Religion also "delivers results," but only in the form of comfort, not knowledge.
OPINION
February 15, 2006
Re "Their Own Version of a Big Bang," Column One, Feb. 11 Is it any wonder that science is in decline in the United States with misguided zealots like evangelist Ken Ham doing everything they can to undermine it? Ham seeks to erase centuries of scientific progress and enlightenment and replace it with ignorance and superstition. Once a proud beacon of research and learning, America will soon become the laughingstock of the scientific world as our schools churn out graduates incapable of understanding the basic principles of the scientific method.
OPINION
July 21, 1996
In the essay "Measuring Political Correctness" (Commentary, July 12), Mark Hartwig argues that the question, "Do you think that human beings, as we know them today, developed from earlier species of animals?" posed in the National Science Foundation survey of scientific literacy "was most likely designed to label unbelievers as scientifically illiterate." There is no issue here. Someone who answers no is scientifically illiterate. What if the questions were, "Do you think that Earth revolves around the sun?"
SCIENCE
May 14, 2011 | Amina Khan
It was a passion for surfing that helped lead Adrienne McColl to the final round of the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Los Angeles this week. The 18-year-old senior at the San Pedro High School Marine Science Magnet had to put away her surfboard after fracturing her back twice during her sophomore year. To stay close to the water, she began investigating ways to restore the falling population of California spiny lobsters, focusing her efforts on keeping lobster larvae alive long enough to have a decent shot at reaching adulthood.
NEWS
February 22, 2007 | Justin Hampton, Special to The Times
ON either side of the stage in the Stella Adler Theatre, Dr. 4 and Professor Cheddar stand with long, plastic cylindrical sleeves. Dr. 4, played by Trish Sie, asks one of the many young theatergoers to just try to fill her 5-foot balloon with air. A boy volunteer attempts to blow it up, barely filling a few inches before running out of breath. "That's nothing!" scoffs Professor Cheddar (Christin Underwood), opening her tube and blowing into it.
OPINION
December 2, 2006
Re "Fundamentalism for adults only," Current, Nov. 26 Michael Bywater wrongly blames science for the deficiencies of those who do not understand it. He claims that science includes "articles of faith," when in fact it deals exclusively with logic and mathematically quantifiable confidence. He tries to equate religion and science, but only the latter necessarily shows its work. Bywater characterizes religion as a "valid way of thinking," though logical validity entails truth preservation, which faith does not. Religion also "delivers results," but only in the form of comfort, not knowledge.
OPINION
February 15, 2006
Re "Their Own Version of a Big Bang," Column One, Feb. 11 Is it any wonder that science is in decline in the United States with misguided zealots like evangelist Ken Ham doing everything they can to undermine it? Ham seeks to erase centuries of scientific progress and enlightenment and replace it with ignorance and superstition. Once a proud beacon of research and learning, America will soon become the laughingstock of the scientific world as our schools churn out graduates incapable of understanding the basic principles of the scientific method.
OPINION
December 31, 2005
Lost amid the tragic revelations of the scientific fraud perpetrated by South Korean stem cell researcher Hwang Woo Suk and his collaborators is the fact that the scientific system works. Erroneous scientific discoveries, whether fraudulent or the result of honest misinterpretation of data, cannot stand up long to the scrutiny of the scientific method. "Yes, but can you repeat it?" is an old saw of the process of experimentation. While the tragedy of the recent events will surely be the opportunity afforded those opposed to stem cell research to harden their stance, the rest of us should be heartened by the rapid uncovering of the facts, and the public should be reassured that the systems in place will continue to protect the integrity of the scientific method.
NEWS
May 4, 2002 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer for the Los Angeles Times Book Review, is the author of, most recently, "The Woman Who Laughed at God: The Untold History of the Jewish People."
Eschatology is the study of "the end times"--the end of history, the end of humankind, the end of the world. Once the exclusive concern of theologians and philosophers, the subject has attracted the attention of astronomers and physicists who debate among themselves about when the sun will burn out and whether the cosmos will collapse on itself.
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