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Scientific Misconduct

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NATIONAL
December 4, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A cardiologist testifying in Merck & Co.'s federal trial in Houston over Vioxx accused the drug maker of engaging in scientific misconduct, suppressing clinical evidence and stifling medical discourse as it promoted the painkiller. Eric Topol, chairman of the cardiovascular medicine department of the Cleveland Clinic, said Vioxx could cause heart attacks anytime after a patient began taking it, and that its risks were apparent as early as 1999, when the drug was approved.
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BUSINESS
November 5, 2010 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Los Angeles Times
Valencia biotech firm MannKind Corp.'s stock fell 11% Thursday after reports that a former senior manager said he had uncovered potentially serious problems with clinical trials of the company's experimental insulin inhaler. The Food and Drug Administration is reviewing the Afrezza inhaler and is expected to make a decision Dec. 29 on whether to approve it. The former MannKind manager, John Arditi, filed a lawsuit against the company in New Jersey Superior Court, saying he was wrongfully fired after internal audits he conducted in November 2009 uncovered "potential fraud and scientific misconduct" involving Afrezza clinical trial data.
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NEWS
September 20, 1988 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
In what prosecutors say is the first criminal conviction of a federally funded researcher on charges of scientific fraud, a prominent researcher in the field of mental retardation pleaded guilty Monday in Baltimore to falsifying scientific data. Stephen Breuning, a 36-year-old psychologist and expert in drug treatment for hyperactive mentally retarded children, pleaded guilty in federal court in Baltimore to charges of making false statements to a federal agency funding his research.
SCIENCE
July 19, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
A Purdue University physicist who claimed to have demonstrated a tabletop fusion process that could revolutionize energy production is guilty of research misconduct in asserting that his findings were independently reproduced, a university committee said Friday. The panel did not investigate whether Rusi P.
NEWS
October 4, 1989
Spurred by concerns about cases of scientific misconduct, a prestigious medical journal will require study authors to sign a pledge that they will let editors examine their raw data if requested, the journal editor said. The journal also will tighten its requirement on disclosing financial interests involved in the research, said George Lundberg of the Journal of the American Medical Assn. The steps are among requirements being imposed to protect the credibility of the journal, Lundberg said.
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, Times Medical Writer
The Department of Health and Human Services has proposed tough new measures to prevent and punish scientific fraud, including spot audits of researchers who receive federal funds, the creation of an "office of scientific integrity" and financial sanctions against universities that fail to monitor their scientists adequately.
SCIENCE
July 19, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
A Purdue University physicist who claimed to have demonstrated a tabletop fusion process that could revolutionize energy production is guilty of research misconduct in asserting that his findings were independently reproduced, a university committee said Friday. The panel did not investigate whether Rusi P.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1988 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, Times Medical Writer
Scientists and government officials are increasingly concerned by reports of irregularities in biomedical research but are deeply divided over what sort of corrective measures are necessary. Some congressman are contemplating new laws to regulate and to punish data-fudging researchers who are often supported by large federal grants. But many biomedical researchers are aghast at such proposals.
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Suggesting that instances of scientific fraud may be significantly under-reported, three prestigious national scientific academies Wednesday called for a tougher system to identify such cases, investigate and resolve them. To accomplish the task, the academies recommended the appointment of a national review board to oversee ethical matters and pursue allegations of fraud. "The pressures for success are inexorable," said Edward E. David, former science adviser to President Richard M.
SCIENCE
September 26, 2002 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An influential physicist whose work in superconductivity and molecular-scale electronics seemed poised to revolutionize his field has been fired by Bell Labs for falsifying experiments over a four-year period. A panel of scientists appointed by Bell Labs found that Jan Hendrik Schon misrepresented data 16 times, publishing identical charts to support his thesis in several scientific papers even though the experiments were different.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Two new reports involving the painkiller Vioxx raise fresh concerns about how drug companies influence the interpretation and publication of medical research. The reports claim that Merck & Co. frequently paid academic scientists to take credit for research articles prepared by company-hired medical writers, a practice called ghostwriting.
NATIONAL
August 18, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The state has agreed to pay $925,000 to unwitting subjects of an infamous 1930s stuttering experiment -- orphans who were badgered and belittled as children by University of Iowa researchers trying to induce speech impediments. Johnson County District Court Judge Denver Dillard issued an order approving the settlement, which still must be ratified by the State Appeal Board. The six plaintiffs said the experiment left lifelong psychological and emotional scars.
NATIONAL
December 9, 2006 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
A senior government scientist from the National Institutes of Health who took about $300,000 in unauthorized payments from a drug company pleaded guilty Friday to a federal charge that he committed a criminal conflict of interest. The admission by Dr. P. Trey Sunderland III came after years of denials by his attorneys and six months after the scientist had asserted his constitutional right against self-incrimination to a congressional subcommittee.
NATIONAL
September 10, 2006 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
A senior researcher at the National Institutes of Health engaged in "serious misconduct" by entering into dozens of unauthorized private arrangements with drug companies and failing to report annually the outside income, totaling more than $100,000, a confidential internal review by the agency has found. Officials at the NIH concluded late last year that the actions of Dr. Thomas J.
NATIONAL
June 14, 2006 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
A senior Alzheimer's disease researcher at the National Institutes of Health pocketed more than $600,000 in fees from Pfizer Inc. while providing the drug company with thousands of samples of spinal fluid drawn from patients who were studied for his government work, congressional investigators said in a report made public Tuesday. The new details about the conduct of the scientist, Dr. P.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2006 | From Reuters
Workplace watchdogs and industry advocates agree: Too much hexavalent chromium -- the chemical at the heart of the movie "Erin Brockovich" -- puts people at risk for lung cancer. But how much is too much? The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is set to rule on that Tuesday.
NEWS
February 14, 1989 | From Associated Press
New pressures for funding, fame and profit have created an atmosphere that is sometimes conducive to scientific misconduct, the chairman of an Institute of Medicine study committee reported Monday. Dr. Arthur H. Rubenstein of the University of Chicago said the field of biomedical research has seen "increased stresses" from competition for decreased funding. And he said the race to develop new drugs makes research irregularities more likely than a decade ago.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, Times Medical Writer
The National Institutes of Health has cleared Nobel Laureate David Baltimore and his co-workers of scientific misconduct charges, but sharply criticized them for failing to take "appropriate action" to adequately correct errors in their work, according to government documents made public Wednesday.
WORLD
January 12, 2006 | Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writer
Disgraced scientist Hwang Woo Suk claimed today that he possessed the technology to create human embryonic clones and hinted broadly that junior researchers and jealous colleagues were responsible for his downfall. The spirited defense came as a surprise amid a barrage of evidence that the 53-year-old scientist had fabricated the findings in two landmark papers in which he claimed to have created human embryo clones.
SCIENCE
December 23, 2005 | Barbara Demick and Karen Kaplan, Times Staff Writers
A panel investigating the work of South Korean cloning pioneer Hwang Woo Suk has concluded that he deliberately fabricated key data in a landmark paper this year, offering the first evidence of what is potentially one of the greatest frauds in modern science. The expert panel at Seoul National University, where Hwang conducted his research, found that nine of 11 stem cell lines he claimed to have created did not exist.
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