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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nicholas Robert Cozzarelli, 67, editor in chief of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and a professor of molecular and cell biology at UC Berkeley, died Sunday at his Berkeley home from complications of treatment for Burkitt's lymphoma. A member of the National Academy of Sciences, Cozzarelli was known for his research on how, in his words, "proteins push DNA around."
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nicholas Robert Cozzarelli, 67, editor in chief of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and a professor of molecular and cell biology at UC Berkeley, died Sunday at his Berkeley home from complications of treatment for Burkitt's lymphoma. A member of the National Academy of Sciences, Cozzarelli was known for his research on how, in his words, "proteins push DNA around."
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BUSINESS
September 20, 1990 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
If your career depended on it, would you have the courage and confidence to attach your name to your beliefs? Most of the world's most brilliant and innovative scientists in physics, chemistry, molecular biology and medicine do not. It's not that these scientists are gutless. It's that the cynical wardrobe of scientific "tradition" allows them to cloak their opinions in masks of anonymity.
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | MALCOLM GLADWELL, THE WASHINGTON POST
Nobel prize-winning molecular biologist David Baltimore, who is also president of New York's Rockefeller University, Wednesday asked that an influential scientific paper bearing his name be retracted because of evidence that it contained fraudulent data.
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | MALCOLM GLADWELL, THE WASHINGTON POST
Nobel prize-winning molecular biologist David Baltimore, who is also president of New York's Rockefeller University, Wednesday asked that an influential scientific paper bearing his name be retracted because of evidence that it contained fraudulent data.
TRAVEL
December 8, 1991
It seems only a short while ago, nature and scientific publications wrote about a remote hideaway for monarch butterflies in hushed and secret tones ("Where Monarch Butterflies Vacation in Winter," Nov. 24). Now, thanks to travel agents and writers and Mexican entrepreneurs, "safaris" are possible to these places. Soon the monarchs will have no more sanctuary and will just disappear. RICHARD A. POEDTKE Vista
NEWS
May 2, 1987
Ernest Haywood Swift, who joined the faculty of Throop Polytechnic Institute in 1919, the same year it changed its name to the California Institute of Technology, has died. The award-winning professor emeritus of analytical chemistry died Sunday at an area nursing home. He was 89 and had been associated with Caltech longer than anyone. Swift went to the Pasadena campus as a graduate student and teaching fellow the year after completing his undergraduate studies at the University of Virginia.
HEALTH
January 10, 2011 | James S. Fell, Fell is a certified strength and conditioning specialist in Calgary, Canada.
My son is 12 years old, and he's going through a lot of changes in his life, most of which he'd rather not see published in this column. However, there is one change I have permission to relay: He's started lifting weights under my supervision. I can already hear the protestations of physicians and parents. "Blasphemy!" they cry. "It's not safe!" Many of them believe that weight training should wait until the end of puberty because it can cause serious, growth-stunting injury.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Nell I. Mondy, 83, a Cornell University biochemist who was considered an international expert on the potato, died Aug. 25 at Cayuga Medical Center in Ithaca, N.Y., the university said. The cause of death was not announced. Mondy was on Cornell's faculty for more than 50 years. Her major research focus was the potato, which she considered to be a "food for the world." Her 1987 proposal on potato marketing resulted in the formation of the National Potato Council research program.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2008 | Patrick Kevin Day
"Mongol," the first film in a proposed trilogy about the life of Genghis Khan, is notable for its hundreds of horses and extras battling it out on the steppes of Kazakhstan. But to really bring the era to life, filmmaker Sergei Bodrov relied on art director Dashi Namdakov's heritage in the ancient Mongolian tradition of darkhans (blacksmiths), which helped him use lifetimes worth of experience to create the film's weaponry.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1990 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
If your career depended on it, would you have the courage and confidence to attach your name to your beliefs? Most of the world's most brilliant and innovative scientists in physics, chemistry, molecular biology and medicine do not. It's not that these scientists are gutless. It's that the cynical wardrobe of scientific "tradition" allows them to cloak their opinions in masks of anonymity.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1985
Bernice T. Eiduson, a clinical psychologist known as much for her ability to secure research grants as for the research that money helped support, is dead of cancer. Dr. Rocco Motto, former director of the Reiss-Davis Child Study Center where she once was research director, said Mrs. Eiduson had died July 31 at UCLA Medical Center. She was 62 and a professor emeritus in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA. Motto said that Mrs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1989
After reading Rep. Rohrabacher's diatribe against "establishment" scientists and after seeing his campaign posters advertising himself as a "Reagan Republican" in Cal State Long Beach classrooms, I can't help but wonder if this is all a prelude to a proposed cut in the already sparse federal funding of scientific research. If Rohrabacher is serious about wanting to encourage imaginative research, why doesn't he propose to divert weapons research funding into special grants, subject to peer review, to small universities?
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