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December 17, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long-sought dream of room-temperature superconductivity will move much closer to reality today as French researchers report that they have achieved superconductivity at minus 10 degrees Fahrenheit. Superconductors, which offer no resistance to the flow of electricity, hold the promise of loss-free transmission of electricity over long distances, the development of levitating trains and more powerful motors, faster computers and a host of other applications.
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NEWS
December 17, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long-sought dream of room-temperature superconductivity will move much closer to reality today as French researchers report that they have achieved superconductivity at minus 10 degrees Fahrenheit. Superconductors, which offer no resistance to the flow of electricity, hold the promise of loss-free transmission of electricity over long distances, the development of levitating trains and more powerful motors, faster computers and a host of other applications.
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NEWS
June 19, 1989
Scientists have for the first time found high levels of ozone and acid rain over thousands of miles of virgin rain forests of Central Africa, the New York Times said in a report from Freiburg, West Germany. It said the discovery by separate teams of scientists from France and West Germany was particularly alarming because the pollution exists throughout the year and is comparable to levels found in industrialized Europe and North America. The scientists said the pollution is largely caused by fires set by farmers and herdsmen to clear shrubs and to stimulate the growth of crops and grass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
Scientists have detected new evidence that ozone concentrations decline periodically over the Arctic, as in the annual depletion that forms the "ozone hole" over Antarctica. The researchers found a high-altitude ozone deficit that resembles an early step in formation of the Antarctic ozone hole, said study co-author D. J. Hofmann. Previous research has also suggested ozone depletions over the Arctic.
SCIENCE
December 20, 2002 | Robert Lee Hotz, Times Staff Writer
People the world over are almost identical, yet still so different genetically that they can be easily sorted into five major groups based on ancestry, new research shows. In the largest study so far of human genetic variation, an international research team separated people by the major migrations of ancient humankind, from Africa into Eurasia, East Asia, Oceania and the Americas, in a way that overturns conventional notions of race.
SCIENCE
September 20, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
In what is bound to stoke the debate over the labeling of genetically modified foods, scientists in France have published a controversial study reporting that rats fed corn that was engineered to withstand spraying with the herbicide Roundup developed health problems, including tumors and trouble with their livers and kidneys. The study, which appeared Wednesday in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology, was embraced by opponents of genetically altered foods, including backers of Proposition 37, which if approved by California voters in November would require most foods with genetically modified ingredients to bear a label.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
Inflammatory bowel disease -- a range of conditions including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis -- afflicts an estimated 1.4 million Americans.  Now some scientists in France have come up with a  novel potential therapy: an enzyme that calms down the gut delivered via a genetically engineered bacterium. The approach -- tested so far only on mice and pieces of inflamed human gut tissue in the lab -- was reported in a paper in this week's Science Translational Medicine . Crohn's and ulcerative colitis, which range in severity and can be chronic or recurring, develop when parts of the body's immune system turn traitor  and -- for poorly understood reasons -- start attacking the gut.  Symptoms include diarrhea, cramping, weight loss, ulcers and intestinal scarring.
NEWS
November 18, 1995 | KENNETH CHANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A fragment of a jaw and three teeth found in a cave in southwest China suggest that early humans arrived in mainland Asia more than half a million years earlier than thought, scientists reported. In the current issue of the journal Nature, the team of international researchers said three dating techniques put the age of the fossils at 1.8 million to 2 million years old.
NEWS
October 15, 2001 | From Associated Press
Baboons in laboratory experiments showed hints of abstract thinking by picking out various images on a computer screen, a surprising finding that raises new questions about evolution and what distinguishes humans from the rest of the animal kingdom. Scientists in France and the United States cautioned that only two baboons participated in the comparative tests, and those monkeys were veterans of earlier cognitive experiments.
SCIENCE
May 12, 2005 | From Associated Press
Scientists in France think they've figured out how to predict which people are at risk of dropping dead suddenly from a heart attack. They found that those whose hearts beat too fast during rest and too sluggishly during exercise have a higher chance of sudden cardiac death. The research, believed to be the first on sudden death in healthy people, relied on simple stress tests like the ones often given to people with heart problems.
SCIENCE
July 3, 2013 | By Amina Khan
If you've ever had a meal that changed your life, maybe you understand what it's like to be a newborn lizard. If you're a Zootoca vivipara lizard, whether or not you get an easy first meal may change the course of your life, according to a pair of scientists in France and Spain. The study, published in Current Biology, shows that small, even fleeting events in an animal's life can dramatically alter an animal's development, even if it has the same genes as its brethren. At a national park in southern France, the researchers captured 120 pregnant Zootoca vivipara lizards, insect-eaters that birth their young live rather than laying eggs.
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