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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1998 | From Associated Press
Three members of the dwindling ranks of Wernher von Braun's World War II German rocket team, which after the war helped put Americans on the moon, have died days apart. Max Nowak, 89, Heinrich Paetz, 88, and Albert Schuler, 83, were original members of von Braun's team of engineers who developed the V-1 and V-2 rockets that Nazi Germany used against Great Britain.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1998 | From Associated Press
Three members of the dwindling ranks of Wernher von Braun's World War II German rocket team, which after the war helped put Americans on the moon, have died days apart. Max Nowak, 89, Heinrich Paetz, 88, and Albert Schuler, 83, were original members of von Braun's team of engineers who developed the V-1 and V-2 rockets that Nazi Germany used against Great Britain.
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SCIENCE
July 22, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A two-year project has been launched to decipher the genetic code of the Neanderthal. Scientists from Germany's Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and 454 Life Sciences Corp. of Branford, Conn., will reconstruct a draft of the 3 billion building blocks of the Neanderthal genome, working with fossil samples from several individuals. The Neanderthal species lived in Europe and western Asia from more than 200,000 years ago to about 30,000 years ago.
SCIENCE
December 6, 2008 | Associated Press
More than 400 years after Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe challenged established wisdom about the heavens by analyzing a strange new light in the sky, scientists say they've nailed down just what he saw. They knew the light came from a supernova, a huge star explosion. But what kind? A new study confirms that it was the common kind that involves the thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf star with a nearby companion.
SCIENCE
November 26, 2005 | John Johnson Jr., Times Staff Writer
Most scientists agree that the moon is a celestial child of the Earth, having been blasted away from its parent by a giant impact with a Mars-sized object during the solar system's infancy. Now a team of European researchers says it has discovered the moon's age, hidden in rock and soil samples retrieved by Apollo astronauts in the 1970s.
SCIENCE
October 18, 2008 | Karen Kaplan, Times Staff Writer
Contrary to the long-standing image of female bonobos as the peaceful matriarchs of their species, scientists have observed the creatures capturing, killing and eating young monkeys in the lowland evergreen forests of Salonga National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The discovery undermines the conventional wisdom that hunting among primates is an outgrowth of male dominance and aggression, according to a study published Tuesday in the journal Current Biology.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2005 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
H. Bentley Glass, a biologist and geneticist who bluntly shared his views on major societal issues, including the blending of genetic traits among races, mandatory testing of prospective parents to prevent birth defects and licenses to bear children, has died. He was 98. Glass died Jan. 16 in Boulder, Colo., of pneumonia.
SCIENCE
October 11, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
A German researcher who laid the foundation for studying surface reactions important in atmospheric chemistry, the production of fertilizers and the operation of catalytic converters in automobiles was awarded the 2007 Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday. Gerhard Ertl, a professor emeritus at the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society in Berlin, received the call from Stockholm on his 71st birthday. "This is the most beautiful birthday gift that one can imagine," he said.
SCIENCE
February 4, 2014 | Amina Khan
How do you make a light, low-density material without compromising its strength? It's a conundrum that has plagued engineers and builders looking for tough, durable materials that don't weigh them down. Now, using a high-tech 3D printer, scientists in Germany have created a lightweight but very strong material inspired by the intricate microscopic architecture of living tissue - our own bones. The research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could pave the way for future super-light materials that could be used in microfluidics devices or to make lighter (and thus cheaper)
HEALTH
May 31, 2010 | By Siri Carpenter, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Botox may be famous for erasing frown lines, but it also may disrupt an important chain of communication between the face and the brain. Not only do our facial expressions reflect our emotional ups and downs, they appear to send crucial feedback to our brain, suggests a growing body of research. Without that full feedback loop, our ability to understand — and be understood — might be constrained. In a recent study of women undergoing cosmetic treatment with Botox, researchers found that the treatment, which blocks facial nerve impulses, seemed to slow the ability to comprehend emotional language.
NEWS
July 6, 2001 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As befits a country in the global scientific vanguard, Germany is engaged in weighty debate about what limits researchers should impose on themselves when the possibilities of genetic engineering seem boundless. But divisive moral discussions about cloning, embryonic stem cell research and screening eggs for genetic defects are ever more complicated in this nation that once turned to eugenics in a quest to build a master race.
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