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NEWS
December 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
Your sweat might help you fight germs. Researchers have found that human sweat contains a versatile antibiotic that might be on the front lines against disease-causing bacteria. Scientists already knew that skin contains germ-fighting substances that go to work after skin injury and during wound healing. The new work found a protein in sweat that was much different chemically. The work, published online Nov.
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SCIENCE
May 3, 2009 | Jia-Rui Chong and Alan Zarembo
The feds were on the phone explaining that a 10-year-old boy had a strain of swine flu no one had ever seen before. As Dr. Michele Ginsberg listened, her mind flashed back to the days before the AIDS virus had been identified, when people were showing up at emergency rooms in California with a mysterious pneumonia. Ginsberg, community epidemiology chief for San Diego County, where the boy was from, picked through her reports of unusual deaths, looking for similar cases.
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NEWS
July 23, 1992 | KRISTINA LINDGREN and MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A team of UC Irvine scientists has isolated a previously unknown virus in nine people who had an AIDS-like disease but tested negative for the two viruses known to cause AIDS. The new virus was first discovered in a 66-year-old Southern California woman who had a type of pneumonia common to AIDS patients but other than a blood transfusion 40 years ago, had no known risk factors for AIDS, UCI researchers announced Wednesday.
NEWS
February 3, 2002 | MATT CRENSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A chemical flame retardant commonly used in foam furniture padding is accumulating so rapidly in the breast milk of nursing mothers that environmentalists and some scientists are calling for a ban on it. Little is known about the toxic nature of polybrominated diphenyl ether, commonly known by the acronym PBDE. Early studies show it poses some of the same dangers as PCBs and DDT.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | United Press International
Three major studies to be released within a year may be inconclusive on whether atmospheric nuclear blasts in the 1950s and 1960s in Nevada caused health problems such as cancer, scientists said Saturday. The first results from two studies sponsored by the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1993 | TED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Researchers have nearly perfected a new form of hydrofluoric acid that they say would greatly diminish the threat of a public health disaster from a spill of the toxic chemical, which is used by several South Bay industrial plants. A joint venture led by Mobil Oil and Phillips Petroleum is developing additives that prevent hydrofluoric acid from vaporizing and forming a toxic cloud if it is spilled in an accident, posing a risk to residents in nearby neighborhoods.
NEWS
April 7, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In a surprising discovery, UCLA researchers have found that atherosclerosis, better known as hardening of the arteries, may arise in part through the formation of bone in the arteries. The finding, reported today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, could open the door to new therapies to prevent atherosclerosis, which is treated by controlling intake of cholesterol and fats, said Dr. Linda Demer, associate chief of cardiology at the UCLA School of Medicine.
NEWS
October 2, 1993 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
After three days of marathon congressional testimony, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton took her health care reform message to some of the nation's most prominent scientists Friday--and learned a lesson from a woman who helped lead the search for the gene that causes Huntington's disease. "I'm uninsurable," Nancy Wexler whispered to the First Lady before receiving an award for organizing an international effort that culminated with the gene's discovery in March.
NEWS
December 1, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
For sun-worshiping Southern Californians, there is bad news and good news about tanning today. The bad news is that a so-called "healthy" tan is actually strong evidence that DNA in the skin has been severely damaged, researchers have found. The hitherto little-understood tanning process is actually triggered when the body begins repairing DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation, a team from Boston University reports today in the British journal Nature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1994 | PHYLLIS W. JORDAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A cloud of dust rising from the Santa Susana Mountains after the Jan. 17 earthquake very likely brought on the unprecedented outbreak of valley fever that plagued Simi Valley and much of eastern Ventura County this spring, scientists say. After five months of interviews and analysis, scientists at the Centers for Disease Control have concluded that residents caught in the dust cloud were most likely to contract the flu-like ailment. There were 203 cases of valley fever diagnosed among Ventura County residents in the weeks after the quake.
NEWS
December 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
Your sweat might help you fight germs. Researchers have found that human sweat contains a versatile antibiotic that might be on the front lines against disease-causing bacteria. Scientists already knew that skin contains germ-fighting substances that go to work after skin injury and during wound healing. The new work found a protein in sweat that was much different chemically. The work, published online Nov.
NEWS
May 7, 2000 | CHRIS LEHOURITES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Claire Nelson was in the seventh grade when the thought occurred to her: Can cancer-causing particles seep into food covered with household plastic wrap while it is being microwaved? "I thought it would be easy to test," said Nelson, 18, a freshman at Hendrix College. Motivated by her discovery that no one had done extensive research on plastic wraps before, Nelson decided to study the effects of radiation on carcinogens.
NEWS
December 1, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
For sun-worshiping Southern Californians, there is bad news and good news about tanning today. The bad news is that a so-called "healthy" tan is actually strong evidence that DNA in the skin has been severely damaged, researchers have found. The hitherto little-understood tanning process is actually triggered when the body begins repairing DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation, a team from Boston University reports today in the British journal Nature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1994 | PHYLLIS W. JORDAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A cloud of dust rising from the Santa Susana Mountains after the Jan. 17 earthquake very likely brought on the unprecedented outbreak of valley fever that plagued Simi Valley and much of eastern Ventura County this spring, scientists say. After five months of interviews and analysis, scientists at the Centers for Disease Control have concluded that residents caught in the dust cloud were most likely to contract the flu-like ailment. There were 203 cases of valley fever diagnosed among Ventura County residents in the weeks after the quake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1993 | TED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Researchers have nearly perfected a new form of hydrofluoric acid that they say would greatly diminish the threat of a public health disaster from a spill of the toxic chemical, which is used by several South Bay industrial plants. A joint venture led by Mobil Oil and Phillips Petroleum is developing additives that prevent hydrofluoric acid from vaporizing and forming a toxic cloud if it is spilled in an accident, posing a risk to residents in nearby neighborhoods.
NEWS
October 22, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A number of widely used pesticides and the residues of banned substances still in the nation's food supply may be contributing to an alarming surge in breast cancer and reproductive disorders, five scientists told Congress on Thursday. The scientists, testifying before a House subcommittee, cited in particular a class of pesticides that behave like female sex hormones when broken down by the human body and may boost both the incidence and the virulence of certain breast cancers.
NEWS
October 22, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A number of widely used pesticides and the residues of banned substances still in the nation's food supply may be contributing to an alarming surge in breast cancer and reproductive disorders, five scientists told Congress on Thursday. The scientists, testifying before a House subcommittee, cited in particular a class of pesticides that behave like female sex hormones when broken down by the human body and may boost both the incidence and the virulence of certain breast cancers.
NEWS
February 3, 2002 | MATT CRENSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A chemical flame retardant commonly used in foam furniture padding is accumulating so rapidly in the breast milk of nursing mothers that environmentalists and some scientists are calling for a ban on it. Little is known about the toxic nature of polybrominated diphenyl ether, commonly known by the acronym PBDE. Early studies show it poses some of the same dangers as PCBs and DDT.
NEWS
October 2, 1993 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
After three days of marathon congressional testimony, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton took her health care reform message to some of the nation's most prominent scientists Friday--and learned a lesson from a woman who helped lead the search for the gene that causes Huntington's disease. "I'm uninsurable," Nancy Wexler whispered to the First Lady before receiving an award for organizing an international effort that culminated with the gene's discovery in March.
NEWS
April 7, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In a surprising discovery, UCLA researchers have found that atherosclerosis, better known as hardening of the arteries, may arise in part through the formation of bone in the arteries. The finding, reported today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, could open the door to new therapies to prevent atherosclerosis, which is treated by controlling intake of cholesterol and fats, said Dr. Linda Demer, associate chief of cardiology at the UCLA School of Medicine.
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