Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsScientists Israel
IN THE NEWS

Scientists Israel

FEATURED ARTICLES
REAL ESTATE
August 19, 2001
California Real Estate Commissioner Paula Reddish Zinnemann has been honored as one of four Women of Action, an award presented annually by the Israel Cancer Research Fund, founded in 1975 to fund cancer-cure research by scientists in Israel. Zinnemann was given the award at a luncheon earlier this month at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
NEWS
April 26, 1985
Caffeine does not appear to make women more susceptible to benign breast disease or breast cancer, contrary to other studies, researchers reported in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. Scientists from Israel and the New York Medical College at Valhalla studied 854 women and found no association between consumption of coffee, tea, cola and chocolate and breast lumps known as benign breast disease.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every night, Gabriel Hernandez turns on his computer, calls up some friends and plays a couple rounds of the latest shoot-'em-up game. But the 22-year-old from Irvine never has to pick up a phone or remember a phone number. Instead, he relies on a new communications tool called ICQ--a software program that lets Internet users send instant messages, swap files and locate someone when they log online.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1989 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
San Diego State University has been named to carry out a $2-million U. S. government program for joint agricultural research among scientists from Israel, Egypt and the United States. The grant, from the U. S. Agency for International Development (AID), also involves the Albert Einstein Peace Prize Foundation of Chicago, with which San Diego State administrators drafted the original program outline.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1994 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Howard P. Marguleas, the man who is hoping to sell his shares in the Irvine Co. for $94 million, had been busily building an agricultural empire with aspirations to rival Sunkist or Del Monte. In the past two years, his Bakersfield-based Sun World has broadened its reach outside of California, with growers in 10 states, Mexico and Chile, and annual sales of about $300 million. But Marguleas' empire appears to be troubled.
NEWS
May 14, 2001 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Smoke marijuana and you'll soon be hooked on harder drugs, society warned. Smoke marijuana and you'll sooner be hooked on potato chips, the smoker discovered. The threat of more dangerous addictions aside, an attack of the munchies was unavoidable. People have known about the connection between marijuana and appetite for centuries. In China and India, people have used it for millenniums to help coax the sick to eat.
MAGAZINE
November 6, 2005 | CHUCK GILKISON, Chuck Gilkison is a writer living in Portland, Ore.
Shortly before I was diagnosed with MS I had decided it was time to get a dog. Growing up I had dogs, and when a girlfriend and I lived in the Napa Valley there were two as part of my family. It just hadn't been the same without one urging me out of bed every morning. I have never gone out looking for a dog; they always seem to come into my life on their own. It had been a few years though, and it seemed I would have to start looking myself if I was going to have another.
SCIENCE
January 1, 2007 | Karen Kaplan and Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writers
The poisoning death of Alexander Litvinenko in November caused by the radioactive isotope polonium-210 sparked a sharp interest in the exotic material, but the onetime Russian spy was not the first to swallow the lethal element. At the height of World War II, in an isolated medical ward at the University of Rochester in New York, Dr. Robert M. Fink gave water laced with polonium-210 to a terminal cancer patient and injected four others with the isotope.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|