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NEWS
December 24, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five years ago, Alexei Vlasov was a promising young cardiologist doing research in biotechnology. Today he's a venture capitalist. Two years ago, Andrei Tikhotsky was a plasma physicist studying the behavior of particles in super-heated gases contained by magnetic fields. Now he's a banker. The "brain drain" of bright minds from Russian science has swelled to a torrent.
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NEWS
December 10, 2000 | MARCIA DUNN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For years, people have talked of traveling to space as tourists, but it has only been talk-- until now. Dennis Tito, who started dreaming of spaceflight when he watched Sputnik's launch as a teenager, who worked as a rocket scientist charting paths to planets, then switched to investing and became a multimillionaire, has a ticket to ride.
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BUSINESS
March 4, 1992 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sun Microsystems has enlisted leading Russian scientists to help with supercomputer development, becoming one of the few American companies to find a way to use the wealth of talent that was used primarily by the former Soviet Union's vast military complex. Sun has been working for a year in cooperative research with a team led by Boris Babayan, a key figure in the Soviet space and defense computing program, said David R. Ditzel, director of advanced systems at Mountain View -based Sun.
NEWS
December 24, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five years ago, Alexei Vlasov was a promising young cardiologist doing research in biotechnology. Today he's a venture capitalist. Two years ago, Andrei Tikhotsky was a plasma physicist studying the behavior of particles in super-heated gases contained by magnetic fields. Now he's a banker. The "brain drain" of bright minds from Russian science has swelled to a torrent.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the largest election of new members to the august Russian Academy of Science in many years, government officials, Jews and members of ethnic minorities were largely excluded, according to results made public Friday amid cries of "scandal" and "shame" from intellectuals here.
NEWS
December 10, 2000 | MARCIA DUNN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For years, people have talked of traveling to space as tourists, but it has only been talk-- until now. Dennis Tito, who started dreaming of spaceflight when he watched Sputnik's launch as a teenager, who worked as a rocket scientist charting paths to planets, then switched to investing and became a multimillionaire, has a ticket to ride.
WORLD
August 8, 2003 | From Associated Press
Iran on Thursday rejected a report that it was close to building an atomic bomb, insisting that its nuclear program was locally developed merely to produce electricity. "Allegations that Iran was working with other countries in order to attain nuclear technology are sheer lies," Foreign Ministry spokesman Hamid Reza Asefi said, according to the Islamic Republic News Agency.
NEWS
May 28, 2000
Acting Up: "Rudy Giuliani announced recently that he and his wife, Donna Hanover, are separating. The two had been growing apart. She wanted to act . . . and he wanted to act like Bill Clinton." (Daily Scoop) Feelin' Lucky: "Free Viagra is now being distributed in Ireland. . . . Well, that beats the hell out of Lucky Charms!" (Rudolph J. Cecera) Presidential Plans: "President Clinton told the London Times he may teach in Great Britain after [he leaves] office. It's just as well.
NEWS
April 25, 1996 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
On the eve of the 10th anniversary of history's worst nuclear power plant disaster, scientists report that a group of children 120 miles away who were born eight years after a reactor exploded near Chernobyl, Ukraine, have twice as many mutations in their DNA as do other children. Although researchers have long known that radiation can permanently damage DNA, this study by scientists in Russia and England offers the first evidence that people can pass such mutations to their children.
SCIENCE
November 6, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Planetary scientists weren't remotely expecting the 62-foot-wide Chelyabinsk fireball to shoot across Russian skies in February  -- they'd had their eyes peeled on a much bigger target that missed the Earth by a decent margin, the asteroid 2012 DA14. But this relatively modest, unseen space rock caused a shock wave that shattered countless windows in the city and injured more than a thousand people. It was the largest asteroid impact on land in more than a century. Researchers are now saying that such impacts, from relatively small asteroids just tens of yards long, might be 10 times more common than we'd thought.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the largest election of new members to the august Russian Academy of Science in many years, government officials, Jews and members of ethnic minorities were largely excluded, according to results made public Friday amid cries of "scandal" and "shame" from intellectuals here.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1992 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sun Microsystems has enlisted leading Russian scientists to help with supercomputer development, becoming one of the few American companies to find a way to use the wealth of talent that was used primarily by the former Soviet Union's vast military complex. Sun has been working for a year in cooperative research with a team led by Boris Babayan, a key figure in the Soviet space and defense computing program, said David R. Ditzel, director of advanced systems at Mountain View -based Sun.
NEWS
May 18, 2000 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton warned Wednesday of an angry sea of new dangers facing the United States in the 21st century, from evolving cyber-terrorism to miniature weapons of mass destruction, and announced a plan to add $300 million to the nation's counter-terrorism campaign.
NEWS
January 24, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is preparing an initiative to ensure full employment for an estimated 2,000 nuclear scientists in the former Soviet Union, including U.S.-funded jobs overseeing the destruction of Soviet atomic weapons and a multinational effort to provide jobs in civilian research institutes, officials said Thursday.
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