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Scientists Wages And Salaries

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NEWS
April 9, 1992 | MARILYN YAQUINTO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Happer wanted to serve his country. When the call came last year from President Bush, the Princeton University physicist was eager to comply. He agreed to become the new director of energy research at the Energy Department--a sub-Cabinet post for which he was highly qualified and one he viewed as vital to his country's future. But the opportunity came at a high price. Government ethics laws required Happer to sever his ties to Princeton.
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NEWS
April 9, 1992 | MARILYN YAQUINTO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Happer wanted to serve his country. When the call came last year from President Bush, the Princeton University physicist was eager to comply. He agreed to become the new director of energy research at the Energy Department--a sub-Cabinet post for which he was highly qualified and one he viewed as vital to his country's future. But the opportunity came at a high price. Government ethics laws required Happer to sever his ties to Princeton.
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NEWS
March 19, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Institutes of Health, long a key to U.S. leadership in biomedical research worldwide, is facing a potentially damaging "brain drain" as a result of uncompetitive salaries, budget constraints, government red tape and what many see as political meddling in basic science. And the flight of talent is keenest where it can hurt the most: among the middle-level and senior scientists who provide all-important creative leadership.
NEWS
March 19, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Institutes of Health, long a key to U.S. leadership in biomedical research worldwide, is facing a potentially damaging "brain drain" as a result of uncompetitive salaries, budget constraints, government red tape and what many see as political meddling in basic science. And the flight of talent is keenest where it can hurt the most: among the middle-level and senior scientists who provide all-important creative leadership.
NEWS
August 3, 1989
The Senate passed far-reaching legislation that would exempt up to 10% of federal workers from the Civil Service uniform pay scale and allow the Defense and Energy departments to pay 525 scientists and engineers as much as $134,250 a year. That level of compensation exceeds the $89,500 paid to members of Congress and Vice President Dan Quayle's $115,000 salary.
NEWS
August 3, 1989
The Senate passed far-reaching legislation that would exempt up to 10% of federal workers from the Civil Service uniform pay scale and allow the Defense and Energy departments to pay 525 scientists and engineers as much as $134,250 a year. That level of compensation exceeds the $89,500 paid to members of Congress and Vice President Dan Quayle's $115,000 salary.
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