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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1999 | Crystal Carreon, (714) 966-7835
The Placentia-Yorba Linda Unified School District has selected Linda Spilker as this year's Hall of Fame winner. Spilker--a deputy project scientist for the Cassini Project, a mission launched in 1997 to collect data from Saturn in the 21st century--was selected for her exemplary achievements, district spokeswoman Karen Bass said. Bass said Spilker, a principal investigator at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, is a role model for students.
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SCIENCE
June 8, 2005 | Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writer
A woman's ability to experience orgasm is significantly influenced by her genes, according to a study of thousands of twins published online today by the British journal Biology Letters. The study found that genetic factors accounted for 45% of variation among women in the ease of orgasm from masturbation, with the rest due to differences in environment. The occurrence of orgasm during intercourse was also genetically influenced, although less so, with 34% of variation due to genes.
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BUSINESS
June 15, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN
The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Eleanor Francis Helin has been named to the Women in Science and Technology Hall of Fame. Helin started the Palomar Planet-Crossing Asteroid Survey in the early 1970s, which has identified thousands of asteroids, including 100 that pass close to Earth. In 1995, she launched the Near Earth Asteroid Tracking program at the Pasadena lab, which uses electronic sensors and a large telescope to track heavenly bodies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1999 | Crystal Carreon, (714) 966-7835
The Placentia-Yorba Linda Unified School District has selected Linda Spilker as this year's Hall of Fame winner. Spilker--a deputy project scientist for the Cassini Project, a mission launched in 1997 to collect data from Saturn in the 21st century--was selected for her exemplary achievements, district spokeswoman Karen Bass said. Bass said Spilker, a principal investigator at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, is a role model for students.
SCIENCE
June 8, 2005 | Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writer
A woman's ability to experience orgasm is significantly influenced by her genes, according to a study of thousands of twins published online today by the British journal Biology Letters. The study found that genetic factors accounted for 45% of variation among women in the ease of orgasm from masturbation, with the rest due to differences in environment. The occurrence of orgasm during intercourse was also genetically influenced, although less so, with 34% of variation due to genes.
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | From Associated Press
AIDS among women is likely to increase dramatically over the next 10 years, with three out of four infections resulting from heterosexual contact, the World Health Organization said today. It estimated that of the 9 million to 11 million adults and children now carrying the HIV virus, 3 million are women. Most of them live in the Third World. WHO said the share of global HIV infections resulting from sex between men and women will rise from 60% now to 75% to 80% by the year 2000.
NEWS
March 15, 1998
Mystery Death: James McDougal, a key Whitewater witness, died of a heart attack last weekend while in prison. "To remove any suspicion of foul play, President Clinton has hired a team of investigators to review the death: the Boulder, Colo., police department." (Jay Leno) Rocket Girls: "Lt. Col.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Lydia Millet
As a teenager I used to plunder my father's shelves of dog-eared paperbacks, kept in a dank, low-ceilinged basement room that also held a turntable, an out-of-tune piano and a distinct eau de mold. What excitement lurked in those browning pages with their brittle edges, whose pieces would chip off in my hands - science fiction and fantasy, mainly, with a smattering of mystery and P.G. Wodehouse and military biographies. Reading Jeff Vandermeer's novel "Annihilation" - the first in a trilogy, all to be released this year - I had the same sensation of dreadful, delicious anticipation I used to have as I cracked open one of the books in the basement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1993
The recent exciting news from institutions in Los Angeles related to gene therapy and pancreatic cell implantation reminds us all of the great and direct potential of biomedical research to enhance our lives ("Baby 1st to Receive Gene Treatment, May 16, and "Artificial Pancreas Is Implanted in Diabetic," May 14). Few would deny that the relatively modest investment made by the federal government to research in our universities and research institutes has paid off, in improvement of quality of life, as well as in establishment of the biotechnology industry.
HEALTH
January 17, 2000 | ROSIE MESTEL
We recently received a press release about "Chair Dancing" (a registered trademark), or how to exercise without having to stand up. A video, we're informed, will teach you how to perform "seated jumping jacks," a "Chair Cha-Cha"--and even a sitting-down tango, though we can't imagine that looking too hot and sultry. Another press release told us all about a robotic chair that gives a head-to-toe massage when sat in.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN
The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Eleanor Francis Helin has been named to the Women in Science and Technology Hall of Fame. Helin started the Palomar Planet-Crossing Asteroid Survey in the early 1970s, which has identified thousands of asteroids, including 100 that pass close to Earth. In 1995, she launched the Near Earth Asteroid Tracking program at the Pasadena lab, which uses electronic sensors and a large telescope to track heavenly bodies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2003 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
Toxic chemicals used as flame retardants are rapidly building up in the bodies of people and wildlife around the world, approaching levels in American women and their babies that could harm developing brains, new research shows. The chemicals, PBDEs, or polybrominated diphenyl ethers, are used to reduce the spread of fire in an array of plastic and foam products in homes and offices, including upholstered furniture, building materials, televisions, computers and other electronic equipment.
SCIENCE
March 10, 2014 | By Amina Khan
Elephants may be known for their memory, but it turns out they're incredible listeners, too. African elephants who hear human voices can tell people of different sexes, ages and even ethnic groups apart, according to a new study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Such keen ears are necessary when trying to survive in territory marked by human-elephant conflict. African elephants who live in Amboseli National Park in Kenya share land with  the Maasai people, who raise and herd cattle.
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