Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsScissors
IN THE NEWS

Scissors

NATIONAL
June 25, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
A Utah judge is under fire for embracing the whole "eye for an eye" thing: He offered to reduce a 13-year-old girl's sentence -- if her mother agreed to chop off the girl's ponytail. The mother -- Valerie Bruno, of Price, Utah --  told the Deseret News that she's filed a formal complaint against 7th District Juvenile Judge Scott Johansen. She says the judge intimidated her into agreeing to the unusual punishment. But if the court of public opinion is any indication, many are applauding the judge's unorthodox measures, which come as more jurists increasingly turn to such "shame" punishments to teach culprits a lesson.
Advertisement
BOOKS
June 13, 1999
Mine, said the stone, mine is the hour. I crush the scissors, such is my power. Stronger than wishes, my power, alone. Mine, said the paper, mine are the words that smother the stone with imagined birds, reams of them, flown from the mind of the shaper. Mine, said the scissors, mine all the knives gashing through the paper's etheral lives; nothing's so proper as tattering wishes. As stone crushes scissors, as paper snuffs stone and scissors cut paper, all end alone.
OPINION
December 24, 2002
Re "Air Travelers Urged to Unlock Bags, Opening Liability Issue," Dec. 20: The FAA wants us to leave our checked luggage unlocked and to secure it with plastic ties that can be "snipped" off at our destination. Snipped off with what? The scissors that are "locked" in our checked luggage because they can't be carried on? Jeffrey Beck West Hollywood
SPORTS
September 24, 2013 | By Sam Farmer
It was a game within a game for the Denver Broncos offense -- and Peyton Manning didn't even know about it. The trio of Broncos running backs were feeling so comfortable in Monday night's 37-21 victory over Oakland, they played a game of rock, paper, scissors to decide who got to blast into the end zone for a one-yard touchdown. "We were just messing around on the sideline," running back Ronnie Hillman explained. "Just something to do. Have fun. " The play in question came in the fourth quarter after Hillman tore off a 19-yard run that looked to be a touchdown.
SCIENCE
March 14, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
What if we chose the pope by rock, paper, scissors? To scholars such as Iain McLean, that's a real mathematical and sociological question, and it isn't as far from the choosing of a pope as you might think. McLean, a professor of politics at Oxford, isn't Catholic, but he's intrigued by the choice of Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio as pope. His interest in such matters is such that he once paired with a Catholic colleague, Josep Colomer, a political scientist at Barcelona University, to analyze the history of papal nomination.s "Electing Popes: Approval Balloting and Qualified-Majority Rule" is a primer of sorts on Social Choice Theory.
NATIONAL
March 26, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The FBI is analyzing a torn, tangled parachute found by children to determine whether it might have been used by notorious 1971 airline hijacker D.B. Cooper, the agency said. Children playing outside their home near Amboy found the chute's fabric sticking up from the ground in an area where their father had been grading a road, agent Larry Carr said. They pulled it out as far as they could, then cut the parachute's cords with scissors. The children had seen recent media coverage of the case -- the FBI launched a publicity campaign last fall, hoping to generate tips to solve the 36-year-old mystery -- and they urged their father to call the agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1987 | BILL EARLS, Bill Earls is a writer in Middlefield, Conn. and
I'd feel better about Valentine's Day if I didn't think it was a holiday invented by construction-paper salesmen. I went to a two-room rural Massachusetts school in the waning days of the Truman Administration. What we did before every holiday, for weeks ahead, was cut construction paper. Halloween was orange pumpkins and black witches. They gave way to brown turkeys with tails that belonged on the NBC peacock.
NATIONAL
July 5, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
A day after Dan Snarr, 62, mayor of the Salt Lake City suburb of Murray, Utah, put his handlebar mustache up for a vote during the annual Independence Day parade, the Los Angeles Times caught up with him to discuss the results. First of all, with which party are you affiliated? I represent the DWR party. I founded it several years ago because I'm disgusted with partisan politics in this country. It's the "Do What's Right" party. I've served since 1997, in a community of about 46,700.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|