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BUSINESS
August 26, 2003 | From Dow Jones/Associated Press
SCO Group Inc., a software developer that is seeking royalties from users of the Linux operating system, has been hit by a coordinated computer attack that made its Web site inaccessible to many visitors for several days. It's the second time this year that the Linden, Utah, company's Web site has been the target of such an attack, in which hackers use multiple computers to overwhelm the site with traffic. An SCO spokesman said the company had notified law enforcement authorities.
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BUSINESS
August 11, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A U.S. judge ruled that SCO Group did not have copyrights that are key to its claims of ownership of technology used in Linux software. U.S. District Judge Dale Kimball in Utah said Novell Inc., not SCO, owned copyrights to the Unix computer operating system. The ruling jeopardizes a related SCO lawsuit against IBM.
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BUSINESS
May 20, 2003 | From Dow Jones/Associated Press
SCO Group said Microsoft Corp. would pay for licenses for the Unix operating system -- a big win in SCO's effort to position its technology against the upstart Linux software. Financial terms of the deal, in which Microsoft will license Unix patents and source code, were not released.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2004 | From Associated Press
A lender is calling due $20 million in loans to SCO Group Inc., a Lindon, Utah, company that has made headlines with suits over Linux-related copyright and licensing claims. In a letter to SCO on Thursday, Larkspur, Calif.-based BayStar Capital cited unspecified breaches of the loan's terms in calling the loans. "This came as a surprise to us," SCO spokesman Blake Stowell said. "We are seeking more info from BayStar on exactly how they feel we breached the agreement.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2004 | From Associated Press
A lender is calling due $20 million in loans to SCO Group Inc., a Lindon, Utah, company that has made headlines with suits over Linux-related copyright and licensing claims. In a letter to SCO on Thursday, Larkspur, Calif.-based BayStar Capital cited unspecified breaches of the loan's terms in calling the loans. "This came as a surprise to us," SCO spokesman Blake Stowell said. "We are seeking more info from BayStar on exactly how they feel we breached the agreement.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
IBM Corp. filed a countersuit against SCO Group Inc., escalating the fight over whether IBM and its clients need to pay SCO to use some key software codes. SCO shares dropped as much as 13%. SCO claims Armonk, N.Y.-based IBM illegally transferred SCO-owned Unix computer codes into IBM's version of Linux, a program IBM backs as an alternative to Microsoft Corp.'s Windows software.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A U.S. judge ruled that SCO Group did not have copyrights that are key to its claims of ownership of technology used in Linux software. U.S. District Judge Dale Kimball in Utah said Novell Inc., not SCO, owned copyrights to the Unix computer operating system. The ruling jeopardizes a related SCO lawsuit against IBM.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
IBM Corp., the world's second-biggest software maker, is misappropriating trade secrets related to the Unix operating system, the company that owns the rights to Unix claims in a lawsuit. Lindon, Utah-based SCO Group, which purchased the rights to Unix in 1995, is seeking at least $1 billion in damages. The suit, filed Thursday in Utah state court, contends that IBM improperly transferred elements of its AIX version of Unix into Linux software.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Darl McBride, chief executive of SCO Group Inc., says he sometimes carries a gun because his enemies are out to kill him. He checks into hotels under assumed names. An armed bodyguard protected him when he gave a speech last month at Harvard Law School. Linus Torvalds, creator of the Linux operating system, calls SCO "the most despised company in technology."
BUSINESS
June 22, 2003
SCO Group Inc. claims in a lawsuit that IBM Inc. purloined proprietary SCO source code and incorporated it as part of the Linux operating system ("SCO Suit May Blunt the Potential of Linux," June 6). Actually, as The Times pointed out, the source code base that SCO purchased from Novell (who in turn purchased it from AT&T Corp.) has long been "enriched" by open source contributions. Most of that enrichment occurred during the time that Unix was an academic product associated with Bell Laboratories.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Darl McBride, chief executive of SCO Group Inc., says he sometimes carries a gun because his enemies are out to kill him. He checks into hotels under assumed names. An armed bodyguard protected him when he gave a speech last month at Harvard Law School. Linus Torvalds, creator of the Linux operating system, calls SCO "the most despised company in technology."
BUSINESS
December 23, 2003
TECHNOLOGY SCO Group Inc., which is seeking royalties from IBM Corp. and other companies that use Linux software, threatened to sue firms that have so far ignored its claims. SCO says it owns the copyright to the Unix operating system and claims that Linux, which IBM backs as an alternative to Microsoft Corp.'s Windows programs, contains code stolen from its software. SCO sent letters to some Unix and Linux users saying they may face legal action for violating its copyright.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2003 | From Dow Jones/Associated Press
SCO Group Inc., a software developer that is seeking royalties from users of the Linux operating system, has been hit by a coordinated computer attack that made its Web site inaccessible to many visitors for several days. It's the second time this year that the Linden, Utah, company's Web site has been the target of such an attack, in which hackers use multiple computers to overwhelm the site with traffic. An SCO spokesman said the company had notified law enforcement authorities.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
IBM Corp. filed a countersuit against SCO Group Inc., escalating the fight over whether IBM and its clients need to pay SCO to use some key software codes. SCO shares dropped as much as 13%. SCO claims Armonk, N.Y.-based IBM illegally transferred SCO-owned Unix computer codes into IBM's version of Linux, a program IBM backs as an alternative to Microsoft Corp.'s Windows software.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2003 | From Reuters
SCO Group Inc. said it registered a copyright for its Unix software to strengthen its lawsuit against IBM Corp. In the suit, Lindon, Utah-based SCO claims its code is embedded in versions of the free Linux operating system that IBM distributed to its customers. SCO also said that beginning in a few weeks, it would offer licenses to companies that are using those versions. Armonk, N.Y.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2003
SCO Group Inc. claims in a lawsuit that IBM Inc. purloined proprietary SCO source code and incorporated it as part of the Linux operating system ("SCO Suit May Blunt the Potential of Linux," June 6). Actually, as The Times pointed out, the source code base that SCO purchased from Novell (who in turn purchased it from AT&T Corp.) has long been "enriched" by open source contributions. Most of that enrichment occurred during the time that Unix was an academic product associated with Bell Laboratories.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2003 | From Reuters
SCO Group Inc. said it registered a copyright for its Unix software to strengthen its lawsuit against IBM Corp. In the suit, Lindon, Utah-based SCO claims its code is embedded in versions of the free Linux operating system that IBM distributed to its customers. SCO also said that beginning in a few weeks, it would offer licenses to companies that are using those versions. Armonk, N.Y.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2003
TECHNOLOGY SCO Group Inc., which is seeking royalties from IBM Corp. and other companies that use Linux software, threatened to sue firms that have so far ignored its claims. SCO says it owns the copyright to the Unix operating system and claims that Linux, which IBM backs as an alternative to Microsoft Corp.'s Windows programs, contains code stolen from its software. SCO sent letters to some Unix and Linux users saying they may face legal action for violating its copyright.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2003 | From Dow Jones/Associated Press
SCO Group said Microsoft Corp. would pay for licenses for the Unix operating system -- a big win in SCO's effort to position its technology against the upstart Linux software. Financial terms of the deal, in which Microsoft will license Unix patents and source code, were not released.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
IBM Corp., the world's second-biggest software maker, is misappropriating trade secrets related to the Unix operating system, the company that owns the rights to Unix claims in a lawsuit. Lindon, Utah-based SCO Group, which purchased the rights to Unix in 1995, is seeking at least $1 billion in damages. The suit, filed Thursday in Utah state court, contends that IBM improperly transferred elements of its AIX version of Unix into Linux software.
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