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Scoliosis

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1996 | JOHN POPE
Charitable organizations often say volunteerism can change lives, and for Taleen Tertzakian, 17, that has proved to be true. Helping doctors in Armenia treat children with orthopedic problems this summer prompted Tertzakian, a senior at Foothill High School, to study medicine with the goal of becoming a doctor herself. "The trip pushed me to realize that," Tertzakian said. "It was a great rush for me."
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SPORTS
August 20, 2009 | Mike DiGiovanna
When Kevin Jepsen was experiencing severe lower-back spasms in late April and was struggling to get his fastball down in the zone, the reliever received a startling diagnosis from doctors: he had scoliosis, an abnormal curvature of the spine. "Here I was, 24 years old, and someone tells me my spine is crooked," Jepsen said. "It was kind of weird. But it made sense as far as the back problems I've had over the years." The condition hasn't slowed the hard-throwing right-hander a bit. After a two-week stint on the disabled list, Jepsen, who had a 19.29 earned-run average in his first five appearances, was sent to triple A to iron out his mechanical problems and strengthen his back.
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HEALTH
June 1, 2009 | Ford Vox
Today's surgeons can nick out your gallbladder via your belly button and excise your thyroid gland without cutting your neck. Now some doctors have added one of recent history's most grueling operations to the ranks of minimally invasive surgeries.
HEALTH
June 1, 2009 | Ford Vox
Today's surgeons can nick out your gallbladder via your belly button and excise your thyroid gland without cutting your neck. Now some doctors have added one of recent history's most grueling operations to the ranks of minimally invasive surgeries.
HEALTH
March 8, 2004 | Jeannine Stein
Many people who practice yoga find that not only do they sleep better and become more flexible, but they experience other health benefits as well. Those with scoliosis (a curvature of the spine) and back pain have found that the stretching and muscle conditioning involved in yoga helps relieve their discomfort. An at-home program, designed specifically for such patients, could help more people benefit from yoga.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1995
The Scoliosis Assn.'s Orange County chapter is sponsoring an informal session for teen-agers and young adults. The purpose of the session is to establish a forum for discussion of scoliosis, to share experiences and offer support for those with the condition, characterized by lateral curvature of the spine. The session will be at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Glendale Federal Bank, 24221 Calle de La Louisa. For more information, call (714) 830-5599 or (714) 831-6395.
HEALTH
July 30, 2001 | SOLANA PYNE, NEWSDAY
Liken many mothers, Nancy Weiss is full of praise for her 16-year-old daughter, Kimberly. The Port Washington, N.Y., mother commends Kimberly's writing ability and her quick wit, but she really raves about Kimberly's long, flat back. Thirty-nine years ago, at Kimberly's age, Nancy spent a year in bed recovering from surgery with a cast that stretched from chest to hips.
HEALTH
February 11, 2002
What the doctor looks for: The screening examination for scoliosis is simple and painless. The doctor first inspects the back for any obvious deformity. Then the child is asked to lean forward, with feet together, bending 90 degrees at the waist. In this position, if a child has scoliosis, a prominent "hump" will be apparent on one side of the back.
NEWS
November 13, 1990
Scoliosis, an abnormal curvature of the spine, afflicts some 700,000 children ages 10 to 14, according to the Scoliosis Research Society. When the spinal curve reaches 25 degrees and seems to be progressing, most doctors recommend nonsurgical treatment. Under debate is the best approach: to wear a brace or to undergo electrical stimulation during sleep. Both approaches aim to arrest the progression of the curve and eliminate the need for surgery.
NEWS
April 13, 2009 | Los Angeles Times
Neurofibromatosis affects one in 3,000 people. It can appear as cafe-au-lait spots and bumps under the skin, or it can lead to complications that include blindness, scoliosis and disfigurement. The Times invited readers to submit questions to Ana Rodarte's surgeons and two other medical experts. Answers were provided by physicians Michael Halls, a plastic and reconstructive surgeon who helped provided Ana's care through the nonprofit Doctors Offering Charitable Services; Tena Rosser, a pediatric neurologist, and Linda Randolph, a geneticist, both with Childrens Hospital Los Angeles.
NEWS
April 13, 2009 | Los Angeles Times
Neurofibromatosis affects one in 3,000 people. It can appear as cafe-au-lait spots and bumps under the skin, or it can lead to complications that include blindness, scoliosis and disfigurement. The Times invited readers to submit questions to Ana Rodarte's surgeons and two other medical experts. Answers were provided by physicians Michael Halls, a plastic and reconstructive surgeon who helped provided Ana's care through the nonprofit Doctors Offering Charitable Services; Tena Rosser, a pediatric neurologist, and Linda Randolph, a geneticist, both with Childrens Hospital Los Angeles.
HEALTH
March 8, 2004 | Jeannine Stein
Many people who practice yoga find that not only do they sleep better and become more flexible, but they experience other health benefits as well. Those with scoliosis (a curvature of the spine) and back pain have found that the stretching and muscle conditioning involved in yoga helps relieve their discomfort. An at-home program, designed specifically for such patients, could help more people benefit from yoga.
HEALTH
February 11, 2002
What the doctor looks for: The screening examination for scoliosis is simple and painless. The doctor first inspects the back for any obvious deformity. Then the child is asked to lean forward, with feet together, bending 90 degrees at the waist. In this position, if a child has scoliosis, a prominent "hump" will be apparent on one side of the back.
HEALTH
July 30, 2001 | SOLANA PYNE, NEWSDAY
Liken many mothers, Nancy Weiss is full of praise for her 16-year-old daughter, Kimberly. The Port Washington, N.Y., mother commends Kimberly's writing ability and her quick wit, but she really raves about Kimberly's long, flat back. Thirty-nine years ago, at Kimberly's age, Nancy spent a year in bed recovering from surgery with a cast that stretched from chest to hips.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1996 | JOHN POPE
Charitable organizations often say volunteerism can change lives, and for Taleen Tertzakian, 17, that has proved to be true. Helping doctors in Armenia treat children with orthopedic problems this summer prompted Tertzakian, a senior at Foothill High School, to study medicine with the goal of becoming a doctor herself. "The trip pushed me to realize that," Tertzakian said. "It was a great rush for me."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1995
The Scoliosis Assn.'s Orange County chapter is sponsoring an informal session for teen-agers and young adults. The purpose of the session is to establish a forum for discussion of scoliosis, to share experiences and offer support for those with the condition, characterized by lateral curvature of the spine. The session will be at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Glendale Federal Bank, 24221 Calle de La Louisa. For more information, call (714) 830-5599 or (714) 831-6395.
SPORTS
August 20, 2009 | Mike DiGiovanna
When Kevin Jepsen was experiencing severe lower-back spasms in late April and was struggling to get his fastball down in the zone, the reliever received a startling diagnosis from doctors: he had scoliosis, an abnormal curvature of the spine. "Here I was, 24 years old, and someone tells me my spine is crooked," Jepsen said. "It was kind of weird. But it made sense as far as the back problems I've had over the years." The condition hasn't slowed the hard-throwing right-hander a bit. After a two-week stint on the disabled list, Jepsen, who had a 19.29 earned-run average in his first five appearances, was sent to triple A to iron out his mechanical problems and strengthen his back.
SPORTS
April 7, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
RANCHO MIRAGE -- Stacy Lewis, the American who climbed to No. 1 in the world rankings two weeks ago, finished the Kraft Nabisco Championship at Mission Hills Country Club with a final-round even-par 72 and a four-day total of 287. When the day is over she'll be in the middle of the pack. Lewis, who won here two years ago, didn't seem distraught about the mediocre week. "I've got a lot of events to play, and I've won twice already this year," said Lewis, who will remain No. 1 in the Rolex World Rankings that measure the performance of the LPGA golfers.
NEWS
November 13, 1990
Scoliosis, an abnormal curvature of the spine, afflicts some 700,000 children ages 10 to 14, according to the Scoliosis Research Society. When the spinal curve reaches 25 degrees and seems to be progressing, most doctors recommend nonsurgical treatment. Under debate is the best approach: to wear a brace or to undergo electrical stimulation during sleep. Both approaches aim to arrest the progression of the curve and eliminate the need for surgery.
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