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Scoop Jackson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2005 | James Rainey, Times Staff Writer
The three-man staff at the Smoking Gun had been crashing on the story well into the wee hours Wednesday night and then through the day Thursday -- scrambling to review, scan and post hundreds of pages of what the website claimed was grand jury testimony from the Michael Jackson child-molestation case. "We need a back room full of monkeys to put all this stuff up there," said William Bastone, co-founder and editor of the New York-based news outlet.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2005 | James Rainey, Times Staff Writer
The three-man staff at the Smoking Gun had been crashing on the story well into the wee hours Wednesday night and then through the day Thursday -- scrambling to review, scan and post hundreds of pages of what the website claimed was grand jury testimony from the Michael Jackson child-molestation case. "We need a back room full of monkeys to put all this stuff up there," said William Bastone, co-founder and editor of the New York-based news outlet.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1986
Jewel Plummer Cobb, president of Cal State Fullerton, has been awarded the 1986 Torch of Liberty by the Orange County chapter of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. The award is given annually by the local ADL to a person who exemplifies the ideals and principles upon which the national league was founded 73 years ago, officials of the Santa Ana-based chapter said. "Dr.
NEWS
October 18, 1995
Hyman B. Raskin, 86, top executive in national presidential campaigns for two decades. A native of Sioux City, Iowa, Raskin earned his law degree at Kent College of Law in Chicago. He served in government administrative capacities, including head of the Illinois regional Office of Price Stabilization.
OPINION
March 10, 1985
Marshall Goldman (Editorial Pages, Jan. 31) believes there are hopeful signs of a thaw in U.S.-Soviet relations, which could reach refuseniks. His views are interesting and useful. We understand that the Jackson-Vanik Amendment is not cast in concrete. So did its prime author, the late Sen. Henry (Scoop) Jackson (D-Wash.). If conditions will warrant a repeat of the 1979 experience, by restoring the flow that saw 51,000 Jews leave the Soviet Union, maybe Goldman's proposal about adjusting the Jackson-Vanik Amendment could become policy.
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | From Associated Press
Voters in Washington state have set up a showdown between Slade Gorton, a moderate Republican seeking to return to the U.S. Senate, and liberal Democrat Rep. Mike Lowry, making his second try for the Senate, primary election returns showed Wednesday. In other results of Tuesday's elections, state Rep. Bob Williams, a fiery, evangelical conservative, upset King County prosecutor Norm Maleng in the GOP governor's race, and in November will face Democratic Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1991
I wish to compliment Kathryn Thompson and Roger Johnson on inviting Bill Clinton to a breakfast gathering of mostly Republican Orange County supporters. Thompson is right in stating that when she "can't talk to a Democrat without being called disloyal, then something is dreadfully wrong." I was raised in Everett, Wash., home of the late Sen. Henry M. (Scoop) Jackson. My father knew him well. "Scoop" was a very responsible senator and a Democrat. No one was stronger on defense than Sen. Jackson.
NEWS
December 3, 1987 | Keith Love
If you believe in historical parallels in politics, San Francisco Democratic consultant Paul Ambrosino argues that the 1988 Democratic presidential race looks a lot like 1976. --"Mario Cuomo is Hubert Humphrey," Ambrosino said. "Humphrey never got in the race in '76 but said he would not rule out a draft at the convention." --Jackson is former Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace this time: "a populist message and a base of angry voters." --Simon is the 1988 version of Arizona Rep. Morris K.
OPINION
May 28, 2006 | Jacob Heilbrunn, Jacob Heilbrunn, a former Times editorial writer, is writing a book on neoconservatism.
DON'T LOOK now, but neoconservatism is making a comeback -- and not among the Republicans who have made it famous but in the Democratic Party. A host of pundits and young national security experts associated with the party are calling for a return to the Cold War precepts of President Truman to wage a war against terror that New Republic Editor Peter Beinart, in the title of his provocative new book, calls "The Good Fight."
NATIONAL
May 29, 2013 | By David Horsey
My boyhood political hero was a guy named Dan Evans. The rare Republican candidate elected in the Democratic landslide of 1964, Evans served three terms as governor of Washington. Upon the death of Sen. Henry “Scoop” Jackson in 1983, Evans was appointed to the open Senate seat and then easily won a special election to complete Jackson's term. Nicknamed “Straight Arrow,” Evans was the kind of public servant Americans desperately need today. He was a principled pragmatist who believed the duty of a politician was not to make speeches about the evils of government but to make government work effectively for the people.
NEWS
April 30, 1985 | Associated Press
Langhorne A. Motley, head of the State Department's Latin America bureau and a key architect of U.S. policy in the region, resigned today after two years in that post, Secretary of State George P. Shultz announced. Shultz said Elliott Abrams, who has served for the last 3 1/2 years as chief of the State Department's human rights bureau, is being nominated to replace Motley, whom he called "a real scrapper."
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