Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsScorchers Movie
IN THE NEWS

Scorchers Movie

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1990 | TORENE SVITIL, Svitil is a Los Angeles-based free-lance writer.
Emily Lloyd is a "scorcher," blazing with righteous anger. Clad only in a white slip, she shakes her finger in imitation of actor Leland Crooke, playing her father, before turning around to shake her bottom at him. "That's great," shouts "Scorchers" director David Beaird as she sashays across the boardinghouse bedroom set. "The script only calls for one wiggle and you put in about five. I love it."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1999 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What do you say about a summer movie season that has already produced at least seven films that will gross more than $100 million, including one that should reach $200 million and another that's heading for $400 million? In Hollywood, the punch line is: Too bad it's already half over. For the major studios, summer 1999 is working like a charm so far with the top 10 films released since the beginning of May--now considered the start of the summer movie season--expected to generate at least $1.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1999 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What do you say about a summer movie season that has already produced at least seven films that will gross more than $100 million, including one that should reach $200 million and another that's heading for $400 million? In Hollywood, the punch line is: Too bad it's already half over. For the major studios, summer 1999 is working like a charm so far with the top 10 films released since the beginning of May--now considered the start of the summer movie season--expected to generate at least $1.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1990 | TORENE SVITIL, Svitil is a Los Angeles-based free-lance writer.
Emily Lloyd is a "scorcher," blazing with righteous anger. Clad only in a white slip, she shakes her finger in imitation of actor Leland Crooke, playing her father, before turning around to shake her bottom at him. "That's great," shouts "Scorchers" director David Beaird as she sashays across the boardinghouse bedroom set. "The script only calls for one wiggle and you put in about five. I love it."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1994 | David Gritten, David Gritten, a frequent contributor to Calendar, is based in London
American dramatist David Beaird is the talk of the town here-- all because of a play he insists was rejected by every major theater in America. His semi-autobiographical "900 Oneonta" (the title refers to the street address of a rambling family mansion in Louisiana) opened at the Old Vic July 18 to a chorus of praise from Britain's normally skeptical theater critics.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|