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July 26, 1990 | JIM MURRAY
Scotland was, as they say, a trip. It was like stepping back a century. If you loved 1890, you'd love Scotland. Oh, they have telephones and electricity and traffic jams and VCRs and high-rises and the ships in the Tay are landing oil and, I suppose, imported cars. But the fields are full of sheep and thistle grows in the meadows and you can step five miles out of Dundee and see the same Scotland Robbie Burns wrote about. St.
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NEWS
June 9, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in the good olde days, no one had to ask what it meant to be English. England was the dominant force in the United Kingdom, which was itself an imperial power. The English knew their place in the world and at home too, where gentlemen sat in the House of Lords and the working class labored in the factories. But this tidy picture has so faded in the white light of modernization that the English no longer recognize themselves in it.
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NEWS
June 9, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back in the good olde days, no one had to ask what it meant to be English. England was the dominant force in the United Kingdom, which was itself an imperial power. The English knew their place in the world and at home too, where gentlemen sat in the House of Lords and the working class labored in the factories. But this tidy picture has so faded in the white light of modernization that the English no longer recognize themselves in it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1999 | RACHEL FISCHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's a slow night at the Celtic Arts Center in North Hollywood. But that means something a little different for fans of Scottish and Irish culture gathered here. Sean Aherne has just finished teaching a free Irish-language class. Now he's pontificating in his lilting brogue about the beauty of his birthplace, Ireland's County Kerry--much to the ire of Tom McNamara, a first-generation Irish-American who owes his allegiance to another county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1990 | MICHAEL ASHCRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rob Renner spread his legs, splaying his blue-and-green kilt, and squatted to hoist a telephone pole to his shoulder. Balancing it, he took a few awkward steps forward, then broke into a run and heaved it. The top of the pole landed squarely on the ground as it tumbled end-over-end. And 17 feet and 92 pounds worth of log completed a near-perfect cartwheel with a solid thud. This is sport--Scottish style.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1991 | LILY DIZON
The 3-year-old boy was too shy to talk to strangers, but when the band started playing, his inhibitions were cast off. He snapped his fingers, wiggled, and began to shuffle his feet--all to the soothing melody of Scottish bagpipes. Others were not as exuberant as the child or the bagpipers in kilts, but the smiles on the listeners' faces reflected their enjoyment of the traditional music featured at the 59th Annual Scottish Festival.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1998 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The steady drone of the bagpipes and their reedy Celtic melodies, accompanied by the sharp, military snap of double-snared drums, can arouse strong emotions. It is a music that calls to Malcolm Bruce Willis, who carries on his family's musical heritage as co-director of Nicholson Pipes and Drums, a group founded by his bagpipe-playing mother 17 years ago. He is quick to acknowledge that strong emotions inspired by the music run both ways.
NEWS
January 16, 1988 | DICK RORABACK, Times Staff Writer
. . . His knife see rustic Labour dight, An' cut ye up wi' ready slight, Trenching your gushing entrails bright, Like onie ditch; And then, O what a glorious sight, Warm-reekin', rich! . . . --"Address to a Haggis," Robert Burns At the moment of truth, the skean dhu glints overhead, then plunges full force into the sheep's stomach.
SPORTS
July 20, 1997 | MIKE DOWNEY
Oh, to be in Scotland, for today's final round of the British Open golf tournament. There are few places I would rather be. Maybe on Mars, photographing rocks. Or meeting outer-space creatures with Jodie Foster. But that's about it. I have been to two British Opens. The first was in 1986. I boarded a train in London, spent hours looking out the window at the cows, crossed the border and finally rolled into Glasgow. There I expected moonbeams and castle moats. Glasgow isn't like that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1999 | RACHEL FISCHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's a slow night at the Celtic Arts Center in North Hollywood. But that means something a little different for fans of Scottish and Irish culture gathered here. Sean Aherne has just finished teaching a free Irish-language class. Now he's pontificating in his lilting brogue about the beauty of his birthplace, Ireland's County Kerry--much to the ire of Tom McNamara, a first-generation Irish-American who owes his allegiance to another county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1998 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The steady drone of the bagpipes and their reedy Celtic melodies, accompanied by the sharp, military snap of double-snared drums, can arouse strong emotions. It is a music that calls to Malcolm Bruce Willis, who carries on his family's musical heritage as co-director of Nicholson Pipes and Drums, a group founded by his bagpipe-playing mother 17 years ago. He is quick to acknowledge that strong emotions inspired by the music run both ways.
SPORTS
July 20, 1997 | MIKE DOWNEY
Oh, to be in Scotland, for today's final round of the British Open golf tournament. There are few places I would rather be. Maybe on Mars, photographing rocks. Or meeting outer-space creatures with Jodie Foster. But that's about it. I have been to two British Opens. The first was in 1986. I boarded a train in London, spent hours looking out the window at the cows, crossed the border and finally rolled into Glasgow. There I expected moonbeams and castle moats. Glasgow isn't like that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1991 | LILY DIZON
The 3-year-old boy was too shy to talk to strangers, but when the band started playing, his inhibitions were cast off. He snapped his fingers, wiggled, and began to shuffle his feet--all to the soothing melody of Scottish bagpipes. Others were not as exuberant as the child or the bagpipers in kilts, but the smiles on the listeners' faces reflected their enjoyment of the traditional music featured at the 59th Annual Scottish Festival.
SPORTS
July 26, 1990 | JIM MURRAY
Scotland was, as they say, a trip. It was like stepping back a century. If you loved 1890, you'd love Scotland. Oh, they have telephones and electricity and traffic jams and VCRs and high-rises and the ships in the Tay are landing oil and, I suppose, imported cars. But the fields are full of sheep and thistle grows in the meadows and you can step five miles out of Dundee and see the same Scotland Robbie Burns wrote about. St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1990 | MICHAEL ASHCRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rob Renner spread his legs, splaying his blue-and-green kilt, and squatted to hoist a telephone pole to his shoulder. Balancing it, he took a few awkward steps forward, then broke into a run and heaved it. The top of the pole landed squarely on the ground as it tumbled end-over-end. And 17 feet and 92 pounds worth of log completed a near-perfect cartwheel with a solid thud. This is sport--Scottish style.
NEWS
January 16, 1988 | DICK RORABACK, Times Staff Writer
. . . His knife see rustic Labour dight, An' cut ye up wi' ready slight, Trenching your gushing entrails bright, Like onie ditch; And then, O what a glorious sight, Warm-reekin', rich! . . . --"Address to a Haggis," Robert Burns At the moment of truth, the skean dhu glints overhead, then plunges full force into the sheep's stomach.
NEWS
October 17, 1993 | DONALD SMITH, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
Call it a Gaelic irony. When Donald Lamont first applied for college, he was turned down by universities in Edinburgh, Glasgow and Aberdeen. Although he speaks good English--with a mild brogue--the young native of this island in the Inner Hebrides couldn't satisfy the schools' exacting English-language requirements. He scored higher in Gaelic, his native tongue. Gaelic, Lamont explained with a wry grin, was the subject he wished to study at these venerable institutions.
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