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Scotland Government Officials

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May 28, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After dreaming of their own government for nearly three centuries, it was probably inevitable that Scots would find the nuts-and-bolts reality of the new Scottish Parliament something less than a dream come true. And known, as they are, for refusing to suffer fools, Scots were not likely to give rave reviews to a corps of 129 politicians, most of whom are first-time legislators.
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NEWS
May 28, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After dreaming of their own government for nearly three centuries, it was probably inevitable that Scots would find the nuts-and-bolts reality of the new Scottish Parliament something less than a dream come true. And known, as they are, for refusing to suffer fools, Scots were not likely to give rave reviews to a corps of 129 politicians, most of whom are first-time legislators.
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NEWS
December 16, 1989 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scotland's top law enforcement official said Friday that he intends to order a public inquiry into last December's terrorist bombing of a Pan American World Airways jetliner over Lockerbie, killing all 259 persons on board and 11 others on the ground. The level of the investigation, comparable to a coroner's inquest in the United States and known formally as a Fatal Accident Inquiry, falls short of the full-scale public inquiry demanded by relatives of the victims, 188 of whom were Americans.
NEWS
December 16, 1989 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scotland's top law enforcement official said Friday that he intends to order a public inquiry into last December's terrorist bombing of a Pan American World Airways jetliner over Lockerbie, killing all 259 persons on board and 11 others on the ground. The level of the investigation, comparable to a coroner's inquest in the United States and known formally as a Fatal Accident Inquiry, falls short of the full-scale public inquiry demanded by relatives of the victims, 188 of whom were Americans.
NEWS
August 3, 1986 | LARRY THORSON, Associated Press
The Texas twang is heard less often these days in Aberdeen, a center for North Sea oil companies, as plunging oil prices force exploration cutbacks and layoffs. Expensive foreign workers are often the first to go. "It's very disappointing because we were getting to enjoy Aberdeen, and we were expecting to be overseas 10 years," said a Texas woman whose husband lost a job servicing new oil wells. "Now we're going back to the United States after just one year.
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