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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1990 | MICHAEL ASHCRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rob Renner spread his legs, splaying his blue-and-green kilt, and squatted to hoist a telephone pole to his shoulder. Balancing it, he took a few awkward steps forward, then broke into a run and heaved it. The top of the pole landed squarely on the ground as it tumbled end-over-end. And 17 feet and 92 pounds worth of log completed a near-perfect cartwheel with a solid thud. This is sport--Scottish style.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1998 | JUDY RAPHAEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You may not think you're familiar with Robert Burns, but if you sang his composition, "Auld Lang Syne," last New Year's Eve, you've already quoted him. Or, maybe you've used the phrase, "The best laid plans of mice and men," which is not originally from John Steinbeck, but from the Burns poem, "To a Mouse." (But you knew that, didn't you?) And remember playing musical chairs to "Comin' Through the Rye?" To Americans, Burns is one of those poets everyone "sort of" knows.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1998 | JUDY RAPHAEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You may not think you're familiar with Robert Burns, but if you sang his composition, "Auld Lang Syne," last New Year's Eve, you've already quoted him. Or, maybe you've used the phrase, "The best laid plans of mice and men," which is not originally from John Steinbeck, but from the Burns poem, "To a Mouse." (But you knew that, didn't you?) And remember playing musical chairs to "Comin' Through the Rye?" To Americans, Burns is one of those poets everyone "sort of" knows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1990 | MICHAEL ASHCRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rob Renner spread his legs, splaying his blue-and-green kilt, and squatted to hoist a telephone pole to his shoulder. Balancing it, he took a few awkward steps forward, then broke into a run and heaved it. The top of the pole landed squarely on the ground as it tumbled end-over-end. And 17 feet and 92 pounds worth of log completed a near-perfect cartwheel with a solid thud. This is sport--Scottish style.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2006 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
Every step of the way, Fox Searchlight's "Little Miss Sunshine" has challenged convention. It sold for a record $10.5 million at this year's Sundance Film Festival. Released in the middle of summer, it has become an enduring national hit. And now, it is trying to enter territory where comedies rarely venture -- the Oscar race for best picture.
TRAVEL
October 4, 1987 | BEVERLY BEYER and ED RABEY, Beyer and Rabey are Los Angeles travel writers
Casual students of Britain's history have always assumed that Rome's legions got only as far as Hadrian's Wall stretching across northern England. This assumption is proved false by the number of Roman entrenchments and fort sites in and around this delightful Georgian town that is gateway to the gentle Trossachs Mountains, as well as to Scotland's Highlands.
TRAVEL
March 6, 1994 | MARK JENKINS, Jenkins is a free-lance writer who lives in Boston. and
More whiskey was the last thing either of us wanted that evening, but it would have been unconscionable to refuse our host David Evamy's toast. His restaurant, called The Anchorage, had been named Scotland's finest by prestigious Decanter magazine the week before--extraordinary for a 25-seat eatery in Tarbert, a postcard-size fishing village in southwest Scotland's Kintyre Peninsula.
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