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BUSINESS
October 28, 1998
Seagate Technology Inc., the world's largest independent maker of computer disk drives, said it will close its semiconductor factory in Livingston, Scotland, next year, eliminating 263 jobs. Seagate failed to find a buyer for the 75,000-square-foot factory after putting it up for sale this month. The Livingston site is Seagate's only semiconductor plant. Seagate has about 86,000 employees worldwide. Shares of the Scotts Valley-based company rose 13 cents to close at $24.13 on the NYSE.
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BUSINESS
October 28, 1998
Seagate Technology Inc., the world's largest independent maker of computer disk drives, said it will close its semiconductor factory in Livingston, Scotland, next year, eliminating 263 jobs. Seagate failed to find a buyer for the 75,000-square-foot factory after putting it up for sale this month. The Livingston site is Seagate's only semiconductor plant. Seagate has about 86,000 employees worldwide. Shares of the Scotts Valley-based company rose 13 cents to close at $24.13 on the NYSE.
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NEWS
January 15, 1988 | Associated Press
About 1,000 workers at 20 National Health Service hospitals walked off the job Thursday to protest a government plan to turn over cleaning and catering services to private companies. Patient care was not affected by the walkout, which union leaders said would last at least 24 hours, according to Ernest McCormick, a spokesman for the Lothian Health Board.
NEWS
January 15, 1988 | Associated Press
About 1,000 workers at 20 National Health Service hospitals walked off the job Thursday to protest a government plan to turn over cleaning and catering services to private companies. Patient care was not affected by the walkout, which union leaders said would last at least 24 hours, according to Ernest McCormick, a spokesman for the Lothian Health Board.
NEWS
May 6, 1988
Britain's socialist Labor Party surged into the lead in nationwide municipal elections, taking seats across the country in the first electoral test of Conservative Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's reform policies. With results in from most of the 211 councils being contested in England, Wales and Scotland, Labor had a net gain of 109 seats, compared to a three-seat net loss for the Conservatives, the British Press Assn. calculated.
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE, The Baltimore Sun
Scottish nationalists were celebrating Friday a stunning victory in a special parliamentary election that produced one of the largest electoral reversals in postwar British history. The Scottish National Party overcame a previously huge Labor Party majority to win the parliamentary seat representing the Glasgow constituency of Govan. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's ruling Tories, who control only 10 of Scotland's 72 parliamentary seats, came in a distant third.
NEWS
May 9, 1986 | Associated Press
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's ruling Conservatives lost heavily to the opposition Labor Party in municipal elections Thursday and dropped one of two parliamentary seats at stake to a centrist coalition. The Social Democratic-Liberal Party alliance carried the north England parliamentary district of Ryedale by nearly 5,000 votes over the Tories with Labor a poor third. In the last regular election in 1983, the Conservatives carried the district, a traditional stronghold, by 16,100 votes.
NEWS
September 12, 1993 | DONALD SMITH, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
The kid in the fifth row wants to see some blood. Robert, a plump, 9-year-old redhead in knee pants, and 274 others from four primary schools have come to the Bannockburn historical museum to see a movie about Robert the Bruce. On this spot he freed Scotland in 1314 from England's Edward II, also known--in an uncomplimentary way--as the Hammer of the Scots. Young Robert especially wants to see how, at the beginning of the fight, his namesake split open an Englishman's head with a battle-ax.
WORLD
May 4, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Britain's Labor Party was facing one of its toughest election challenges in a decade today, after voters delivered what is widely seen as a last referendum on Prime Minister Tony Blair's government. Early returns from Thursday's vote offered few hints of a decisive outcome in a contest likely to determine the future of the Scottish independence movement and provide a window on Britain's political future after Blair.
NEWS
February 25, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is sometimes said that this lovely, Georgian-style city above the broad, glistening Firth of Forth is a capital without a nation. Now, however, nearly three centuries after Scotland's 1707 union with England, that saying may be on its way out. For the cause of Scottish nationalism has surged dramatically in recent months with an impetus that has surprised Scots themselves and shaken British politicians.
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