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NEWS
September 11, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Scottish voters will decide in a referendum today whether they should have their own parliament again after nearly 300 years, and opinion polls point to an overwhelming "yes" vote. A newspaper poll put support for the proposed 129-seat assembly at 61%, with 20% intending to vote "no." Although the Scottish and English parliaments were united in 1707, Scotland has its own legal, educational and local government systems. The proposal is backed by British Prime Minister Tony Blair's Labor Party.
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NEWS
September 13, 1997 | From Reuters
Edinburgh brimmed with joy and confidence Friday after Scots voted resoundingly to form a Parliament in their capital after 290 years without one. Jubilation was clear as patriotic flags appeared in windows overnight and a huge Scottish St. Andrews flag with a diagonal white cross on a dark blue background was draped around the headquarters of the Scottish National Party.
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NEWS
September 12, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With prideful nationalism, Scots on Thursday voted for self-rule and the creation of their first Parliament in three centuries. Official results today from a national referendum echoed the universal predictions of polls and pundits: a landslide "Yes" for the Parliament. There was also strong support for a second "Yes"--to give the Parliament tax-making powers.
NEWS
September 12, 1997 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With prideful nationalism, Scots on Thursday voted for self-rule and the creation of their first Parliament in three centuries. Official results today from a national referendum echoed the universal predictions of polls and pundits: a landslide "Yes" for the Parliament. There was also strong support for a second "Yes"--to give the Parliament tax-making powers.
NEWS
September 13, 1997 | From Reuters
Edinburgh brimmed with joy and confidence Friday after Scots voted resoundingly to form a Parliament in their capital after 290 years without one. Jubilation was clear as patriotic flags appeared in windows overnight and a huge Scottish St. Andrews flag with a diagonal white cross on a dark blue background was draped around the headquarters of the Scottish National Party.
SPORTS
July 17, 2013 | By Bill Dwyre
   GULLANE, Scotland -- Politics and political correctness were the topic of the day at the British Open, where officials of the Royal and Ancient governing body were slapped around a bit by the media on the issue of playing this year's event at a place where women are not allowed to be members.      Muirfield Golf Club, establishing a membership in 1744, has no female members, although many female guest players. The issue, simlar to the one that the home of the Masters, Augusta National, wrestled with for years until admitting two women last year, was brought to a head when the Scotland First Minister announced that he would boycott the event at Muirfield because of the club's exclusionary policies.
NEWS
September 11, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Scottish voters will decide in a referendum today whether they should have their own parliament again after nearly 300 years, and opinion polls point to an overwhelming "yes" vote. A newspaper poll put support for the proposed 129-seat assembly at 61%, with 20% intending to vote "no." Although the Scottish and English parliaments were united in 1707, Scotland has its own legal, educational and local government systems. The proposal is backed by British Prime Minister Tony Blair's Labor Party.
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