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NEWS
January 14, 1987 | Associated Press
Caterpillar Inc., the earth-moving equipment manufacturer, said today that it is closing a plant in Glasgow, Scotland, that employs 1,220 people and is considering closures in Iowa and Oregon that would affect another 1,630. As part of a long-term retrenchment, Caterpillar will take a pretax write-off of $109 million in its fourth quarter, company spokesman Gil Nolde said. Plant closings are contemplated in Davenport, Iowa, where 1,300 are employed, and in The Dalles, Ore.
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TRAVEL
July 25, 2010
Scottish characters Rosemary McClure's Travel story on Scotland and Scotch ["A Toast to High Spirits," July 11] brought back fond memories of my association with the late Rob Walker, heir to the Johnnie Walker Scotch fortune. The owner of a Formula 1 racing team whose drivers included Stirling Moss and Jo Siffert, Rob was the quintessential country gentleman who served as Road & Track magazine's Formula 1 correspondent. Seldom seen at the track sans his blue blazer and ascot, Rob also loved American racing.
WORLD
May 4, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Britain's Labor Party was facing one of its toughest election challenges in a decade today, after voters delivered what is widely seen as a last referendum on Prime Minister Tony Blair's government. Early returns from Thursday's vote offered few hints of a decisive outcome in a contest likely to determine the future of the Scottish independence movement and provide a window on Britain's political future after Blair.
TRAVEL
April 2, 1995 | JUDITH SIMS, Sims is an Oregon-based free-lance writer. and
The approach to this landmark Scottish garden, a mile-long driveway lined with tall beech trees, looks more like a country road than a private preserve. We passed a pond where geese were taxiing for takeoff. A gardener scythed grass under the trees. A light rain started to fall, but then we'd been rained on all over Scotland. We were used to it.
TRAVEL
June 5, 2005 | Beverly Beyette, Times Staff Writer
"Haste ye back," beckoned a sign at the car ferry terminal at Ardrossan on Scotland's western coast as the boat eased up to the dock after crossing from the Isle of Arran. I told myself I'd heed the invitation. It was July and I'd been distillery-hopping on Scottish islands. After two days on Arran, the largest of the Firth of Clyde islands, I had followed the whiskey trail to Islay and Jura in the southern Inner Hebrides.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2010
Kerry Washington, 33, is probably best known for playing the wives of Ray Charles (in "Ray") and Idi Amin (in "The Last King of Scotland"). Other prominent appearances include the two "Fantastic Four" movies, "Mr. and Mrs. Smith," "Lakeview Terrace" with Samuel L. Jackson and Patrick Wilson, "The Human Stain" with Anthony Hopkins, "I Think I Love My Wife" with Chris Rock, "Bad Company" with Hopkins and Rock, and Spike Lee's "She Hate Me." Of 2006's "The Dead Girl," she says, "I watched it again just recently when Brittany [Murphy]
SPORTS
June 15, 1996 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
England and Scotland, the rose and the thistle, are neighbors in the same kingdom. But when it comes to soccer, forget brotherhood. Think instead of flashing swords and screaming blue-painted faces. Scots and English celebrate their first soccer encounter in seven years at London's Wembley Stadium this afternoon as the dramatic--and potentially violent--centerpiece of Euro 96, a 16-nation soccer extravaganza to crown a continental champion.
WORLD
July 6, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Police on Thursday searched a house in Scotland that may have been where the bombs were produced for attempted terrorist attacks in London and at Glasgow Airport, officials and news reports said. Community leaders in Scotland appealed for calm after Glasgow police said there had been dozens of racially motivated incidents since the attack on the airport Saturday in which two men crashed a gasoline-laden Jeep Cherokee into an entrance to the main terminal.
OPINION
October 22, 2012
'Braveheart" will have his revenge. That's how some fervent Scottish nationalists will portray the announcement last week that the British government has approved a referendum on whether Scotland will end its 300-year-old formal union with England. Meeting in Edinburgh, British Prime Minister David Cameron and Alex Salmond, Scotland's pro-independence first minister, agreed that residents of Scotland -- including 16- and 17-year olds -- would decide the issue in a 2014 plebiscite. For Americans, schooled by the outcome of our Civil War to consider secession unthinkable, the willingness of the British government to see itself potentially dismembered is remarkable.
WORLD
May 2, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
It was on the low cliffs looming over the white-capped Firth of Forth here that Alexander III, the last of Scotland's Celtic kings, plunged from his horse to his death one inky night 721 years ago. England backed a successor, and ultimately invaded, touching off the wars of Scottish independence that inspired medieval verses about refusing to submit to "the bonds of slavery entwined" and opulently tragic films such as "Braveheart."
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