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September 8, 2008 | Kurt Streeter
NEW YORK -- We figured the men's final at Flushing Meadows would be a matter of Roger Federer trying to gain redemption and Rafael Nadal trying to cement his status. Instead, we have a surprise: A Gumby-limbed Scotsman will now take to center court and play the great Federer for the 127th U.S. Open title. The Scotsman's name, for the dilettantes who tune in only on the last day of tournaments like this, is Andy Murray. He's 21, for a good while a rising star, and as of this week a legitimate Grand Slam title threat.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2010 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John Shepherd-Barron, a Scotsman credited with inventing the modern world's first automatic cash machine, died Saturday after a short illness. He was 84. Shepherd-Barron died at northern Scotland's Raigmore Hospital, funeral director Alasdair Rhind said Wednesday. Shepherd-Barron once said he came up with the idea of the cash dispensers after being locked out of his bank. He also said his invention was inspired by chocolate vending machines. "It struck me there must be a way I could get my own money, anywhere in the world or the U.K.," he said in an interview with the BBC in 2007.
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NEWS
April 19, 1987
Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi has "intervened for the release" of a British engineer jailed in Tripoli since November, 1982, the Libyan news agency Jana reported. However, a British Foreign Office spokesman said Robert Maxwell, a 38-year-old Scotsman serving a 12-year sentence for alleged bribery and industrial espionage, had not been freed "as far as we know."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2009 | Yvonne Villarreal
"I felt damn sexy wearing it," Simon Pegg purred into the phone, "and I took a lot of clandestine photographs in my trailer." He was talking, thankfully, about the Starfleet uniform he wore for his role as Montgomery "Scotty" Scott, made famous by the late James Doohan. The irreverent star of "Shaun of the Dead" and "Hot Fuzz" has "unhealthy" knowledge of sci-fi, horror and comics. As a boy, he watched "Star Trek" on the BBC at dinner.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Less than a week after being sworn in as a U.S. citizen, Craig Ferguson learned he'll be telling jokes to President Bush. The CBS "Late Late Show" host revealed Tuesday that he's been booked as the entertainer at the White House correspondents' dinner in Washington, scheduled for April 26. Ferguson, a Scotsman, recently passed a U.S. citizenship test and was sworn in Friday. For his late-night viewers, he described the correspondents' dinner as "like the Oscars for politicians."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1987 | KRISTINE McKENNA
Rock critic Greg Shaw once described Fabian and Frankie Avalon as "pop stars aimed at suburban teen-age girls who want fluffy images of male niceness on which to focus their pubescent dreams." Aztec Camera's Roddy Frame is living proof there's nothing new under the sun, as that description fits him like a glove.
SPORTS
July 4, 1996 | SHAV GLICK
Former Dodger catcher Darrin Fletcher, the slowest Montreal Expo and maybe the slowest runner in the National League, needed a triple going into his last at-bat for the cycle against the Pittsburgh Pirates. "I thought about it in the on-deck circle, but then I thought, 'What would happen if I hit one?' " he said. "I mean, Ty Cobb would have turned over in his grave until he was upside down. "For me to get a triple, an outfielder would have to fall down, break an ankle or pull a muscle.
TRAVEL
May 5, 1991
I refer to your very interesting coverage of railway journeys ("Romancing the Rails," March 24). However, on page L17 you state, "one of the most luxurious trains in the world, the Royal Scotsman takes in a number of journeys through Scotland and England." I believe you are referring to the "Flying Scotsman," which travels from London to Scotland and are confusing it with the Royal Scot (not Scotsman.) PETER HUME El Toro Editor's note: The name is correct as stated in the story.
TRAVEL
April 30, 1989
Gena Reisner's story, "Scotland By Train" (April 2), was most interesting, especially (in mentioning) the Royal Scotsman. In celebration of our 50th wedding anniversary, my wife and I took the six-day tour. Words cannot describe the luxury of this train. We had a stateroom, including all private facilities. The dining car was used by Earl Haig in World War I. The train includes carriages from the late Victorian and Edwardian periods and is limited to 28 people. And side trips to such things as historic sites and castles not open to the public are arranged.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2009 | Yvonne Villarreal
"I felt damn sexy wearing it," Simon Pegg purred into the phone, "and I took a lot of clandestine photographs in my trailer." He was talking, thankfully, about the Starfleet uniform he wore for his role as Montgomery "Scotty" Scott, made famous by the late James Doohan. The irreverent star of "Shaun of the Dead" and "Hot Fuzz" has "unhealthy" knowledge of sci-fi, horror and comics. As a boy, he watched "Star Trek" on the BBC at dinner.
SPORTS
September 8, 2008 | Chuck Culpepper, Special to The Times
NEW YORK -- The common phrase "big three" in men's tennis might need to undergo some heavy editing because of the ascent of a 21-year-old Scot with a glistening game and an apparent inability to purchase a razor. "Big three" has applied to Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic, and the chasm between them and the rankings underlings, but "big four" seemed more operative early Sunday evening because of the sheer caliber of Andy Murray. Scruffy in the cheeks and gifted in the backhand and increasingly self-assured because he's increasingly fit, Murray accessed a new echelon inside Arthur Ashe Stadium when, in his first Grand Slam semifinal, he stood right in there with No. 1-ranked Nadal and looked downright cozy.
SPORTS
September 8, 2008 | Kurt Streeter
NEW YORK -- We figured the men's final at Flushing Meadows would be a matter of Roger Federer trying to gain redemption and Rafael Nadal trying to cement his status. Instead, we have a surprise: A Gumby-limbed Scotsman will now take to center court and play the great Federer for the 127th U.S. Open title. The Scotsman's name, for the dilettantes who tune in only on the last day of tournaments like this, is Andy Murray. He's 21, for a good while a rising star, and as of this week a legitimate Grand Slam title threat.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2008 | Robert Abele, Special to The Times
For MANY actors, the thrill of the calling lies in the ornamental and internal details that transform who they are into what they're not. And good-natured Scottish actor Kevin McKidd has made a name for himself playing such varied roles as a doomed drug addict ("Trainspotting"), a brooding Caesar-era soldier (HBO's "Rome") and a time-traveling journalist (last year's NBC drama "Journeyman").
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Less than a week after being sworn in as a U.S. citizen, Craig Ferguson learned he'll be telling jokes to President Bush. The CBS "Late Late Show" host revealed Tuesday that he's been booked as the entertainer at the White House correspondents' dinner in Washington, scheduled for April 26. Ferguson, a Scotsman, recently passed a U.S. citizenship test and was sworn in Friday. For his late-night viewers, he described the correspondents' dinner as "like the Oscars for politicians."
SPORTS
May 28, 2007 | Ed Hinton, Special to The Times
Have you seen the trailers for Ashley Judd's latest performance? They've been all over TV. Terrific stuff. She's a race driver's wife, running barefoot in a pouring rain down the pit lane at Indy, soaking wet, hair and dress stuck to her skin, shivering more with joy than cold -- just ecstatic.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2007 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
"The Flying Scotsman" -- the story of '90s Scottish cycling sensation Graeme Obree -- should, like many good sports movies, be a high-flying tale of triumph, tragedy and redemption.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2003 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Parthenogenesis is what happens when conception occurs without a sexual act. It's a mouthful of a word, and also the title of an occasionally baffling, always ear-tingling, 51-minute dramatic "scene" by the hugely gifted Scotsman James MacMillan, who fronted the Philharmonic New Music Group at Zipper Hall on Monday night.
NEWS
August 20, 2002 | BERNADETTE MURPHY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
CALIFORNIA DREAMING A Smooth-Running, Low-Mileage, Best-Priced American Adventure By Lawrence Donegan Atria Books 230 pages, $24 Scottish writer Lawrence Donegan has made his career peering behind postcard facades and uncovering the comic, less-than-picture-perfect reality that resides there. In "No News at Throat Lake" he moved to a small town in rural Ireland and reported on country life there, cattle and all.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2006 | James Prichard, Associated Press
His permanent works can inspire awe, but even Andy Goldsworthy's temporary pieces have made a lasting impression on the art world. The 49-year-old Scottish sculptor, land artist and photographer's obsession with using twigs, leaves, sand, ice and other natural materials to craft artwork was the subject of a critically acclaimed 2001 documentary, "Rivers and Tides." The outdoors is Goldsworthy's canvas.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2003 | Lewis Beale, Special to The Times
New York It's 1876 and Erast Petrovich Fandorin is working as a low-level clerk in the Criminal Investigation Division of the Moscow Police Department. But the very public suicide of a wealthy heir will soon lead the ambitious 20-year-old on the trail of a shadowy organization bent on world domination. Using luck, pluck, a sharp intuitive sense and some tools of the new forensic sciences, Fandorin crushes the plot and lives to pursue more evildoers another day.
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