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Scott Berg

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1989
William Wilson's March 19 review of the Man Ray exhibition at MOCA describes by numerical importance the artist's work. It states that "The Lovers" is Man Ray's best painting, his second-best painting is "The Rope Dancer Accompanies Herself With Her Shadows" and the third-best painting is of the Marquis de Sade. Could Mr. Wilson educate me as to what are the sixth-best and fourteenth-best paintings in the Man Ray exhibit? SCOTT BERG Los Angeles
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Scott Martelle
38 Nooses Lincoln, Little Crow, and the Beginning of the Frontier's End Scott W. Berg Pantheon: 384 pp., $27.95 In summer 1862, as President Abraham Lincoln waged war to keep 11 Southern slave-holding states from seceding from the Union, four young Dakota Indians approached a farmhouse in what is now central Minnesota looking for food after a failed hunting expedition. Drunk, they quickly compounded a series of bad decisions and shot dead the farmer, two other men, a woman and a 15-year-old girl, all white.
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NEWS
November 6, 1998 | IRENE LACHER
Maybe we should scratch movie stardom from our list of career goals. After all, nobody said anything about having to flirt with the grim reaper, the least attractive prospect on any girl's dance card. That job tip comes courtesy of the dedicated and toothsome Johnathon Schaech. The star of TNT's upcoming "Houdini" is still with us--vertically, that is--thanks to the magic of movie crews, who pulled him out of a Chinese water torture chamber before he was beyond pain.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2003 | Geraldine Baum, Times Staff Writer
New York Perhaps the most remarkable aspect of a new memoir about Katharine Hepburn is how it came to be written in the first place, how an accomplished biographer and a famously prickly megastar came together to unravel some of the most intimate details of her life.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
Sam Goldwyn had had two biographies written about him in his lifetime and didn't like either one, his son Sam Goldwyn Jr. says. The motion picture pioneer wanted one written--after his death, so it could be good, and honest. "I went to Michener, who declined, and to Fawn Brodie (the late UCLA historian and biographer of Thomas Jefferson). We almost agreed, then she decided to do Nixon instead," Goldwyn says. When Scott Berg's biography of Maxwell Perkins appeared, Goldwyn was particularly impressed by Berg's ability to place Perkins in the larger context of his times and to keep him the central figure, not overshadowed by Hemingway and the other major authors Perkins was editing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1999 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A. Scott Berg, who won a Pulitzer Prize last week for his biography of Charles Lindbergh, was honored again Friday night when he was awarded the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for biography. Judges in The Times' 19th annual book contest praised Berg's "Lindbergh" for its "cinematic sweep, novelistic detail and writerly grace" and said it embodied "the grandeur, tragedy and madness of our century with an intimacy--and a cumulative power--that few biographies achieve."
NEWS
May 5, 1989 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
At the start of the 9 years he spent researching and writing about the life of legendary Hollywood mogul Samuel Goldwyn, biographer A. Scott Berg was given access to an old storage vault in the heart of Hollywood. For a biographer, Berg told his audience at a book and author luncheon in Costa Mesa on Wednesday, opening the door to 60 years' worth of Goldwyn's papers and memorabilia was like an archeologist stumbling upon King Tut's tomb. "As I walked into this tomb, this musty fur vault, I saw nothing but wonderful things," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2012 | By Scott Martelle
38 Nooses Lincoln, Little Crow, and the Beginning of the Frontier's End Scott W. Berg Pantheon: 384 pp., $27.95 In summer 1862, as President Abraham Lincoln waged war to keep 11 Southern slave-holding states from seceding from the Union, four young Dakota Indians approached a farmhouse in what is now central Minnesota looking for food after a failed hunting expedition. Drunk, they quickly compounded a series of bad decisions and shot dead the farmer, two other men, a woman and a 15-year-old girl, all white.
NEWS
April 21, 1999 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It does sound preordained, or prescribed, as A. Scott Berg says. But then again, biographers are used to pulling order out of the seemingly random events that make up a life. Berg, biographer of the great editor Max Perkins, Samuel Goldwyn and now Charles Lindbergh, for which he won the Pulitzer Prize last week, does not say it this way, but it is clear that he feels the inspiration to write these books comes not only from his own well-prepared mind but from the universe as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
The conscientious biographer of a departed figure is like a private eye--Ross Macdonald's Lew Archer comes to mind--trying to follow a very cold trail into the past, in the hope of finding clues to all that happened later. The public years of the man who named himself Sam Goldwyn were abundantly documented. Hollywood's most successful independent producer ("Dodsworth," "Wuthering Heights," "The Little Foxes," "The Best Years of Our Lives" and many other films in a 40-year career)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1999 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A. Scott Berg, who won a Pulitzer Prize last week for his biography of Charles Lindbergh, was honored again Friday night when he was awarded the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for biography. Judges in The Times' 19th annual book contest praised Berg's "Lindbergh" for its "cinematic sweep, novelistic detail and writerly grace" and said it embodied "the grandeur, tragedy and madness of our century with an intimacy--and a cumulative power--that few biographies achieve."
NEWS
April 21, 1999 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It does sound preordained, or prescribed, as A. Scott Berg says. But then again, biographers are used to pulling order out of the seemingly random events that make up a life. Berg, biographer of the great editor Max Perkins, Samuel Goldwyn and now Charles Lindbergh, for which he won the Pulitzer Prize last week, does not say it this way, but it is clear that he feels the inspiration to write these books comes not only from his own well-prepared mind but from the universe as well.
NEWS
November 6, 1998 | IRENE LACHER
Maybe we should scratch movie stardom from our list of career goals. After all, nobody said anything about having to flirt with the grim reaper, the least attractive prospect on any girl's dance card. That job tip comes courtesy of the dedicated and toothsome Johnathon Schaech. The star of TNT's upcoming "Houdini" is still with us--vertically, that is--thanks to the magic of movie crews, who pulled him out of a Chinese water torture chamber before he was beyond pain.
BOOKS
September 20, 1998 | BENJAMIN SCHWARZ, Benjamin Schwarz is a contributing writer to Book Review and a contributing editor to the Atlantic Monthly
From the moment Charles Lindbergh descended from the sky at Le Bourget airfield in Paris, the world, and particularly his American homeland, took possession of a new god. At the age of 25, Lindbergh became, as A. Scott Berg amply demonstrates in one of the most important biographies of the decade, "the most celebrated living person ever to walk the earth."
NEWS
May 5, 1989 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
At the start of the 9 years he spent researching and writing about the life of legendary Hollywood mogul Samuel Goldwyn, biographer A. Scott Berg was given access to an old storage vault in the heart of Hollywood. For a biographer, Berg told his audience at a book and author luncheon in Costa Mesa on Wednesday, opening the door to 60 years' worth of Goldwyn's papers and memorabilia was like an archeologist stumbling upon King Tut's tomb. "As I walked into this tomb, this musty fur vault, I saw nothing but wonderful things," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
Sam Goldwyn had had two biographies written about him in his lifetime and didn't like either one, his son Sam Goldwyn Jr. says. The motion picture pioneer wanted one written--after his death, so it could be good, and honest. "I went to Michener, who declined, and to Fawn Brodie (the late UCLA historian and biographer of Thomas Jefferson). We almost agreed, then she decided to do Nixon instead," Goldwyn says. When Scott Berg's biography of Maxwell Perkins appeared, Goldwyn was particularly impressed by Berg's ability to place Perkins in the larger context of his times and to keep him the central figure, not overshadowed by Hemingway and the other major authors Perkins was editing.
BOOKS
March 26, 1989 | Otto Friedrich, Friedrich, whose biography of Glenn Gould will be published by Random House in April, is the author of "City of Nets: A Portrait of Hollywood in the 1940s." and
Sam Goldwyn, one of Hollywood's last founding fathers, was a hard, arrogant and ruthless man. He was a chronic liar, and compulsively rude. He cheated at cards. He cheated at croquet. He cheated on his wives. He may not have actually said the notorious "Goldwynism" that "a verbal agreement isn't worth the paper it's written on," but it expressed his general view of ethics in business. He also reneged on alimony payments to his first wife and child-support payments for his daughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2003 | Geraldine Baum, Times Staff Writer
New York Perhaps the most remarkable aspect of a new memoir about Katharine Hepburn is how it came to be written in the first place, how an accomplished biographer and a famously prickly megastar came together to unravel some of the most intimate details of her life.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
The conscientious biographer of a departed figure is like a private eye--Ross Macdonald's Lew Archer comes to mind--trying to follow a very cold trail into the past, in the hope of finding clues to all that happened later. The public years of the man who named himself Sam Goldwyn were abundantly documented. Hollywood's most successful independent producer ("Dodsworth," "Wuthering Heights," "The Little Foxes," "The Best Years of Our Lives" and many other films in a 40-year career)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1989
William Wilson's March 19 review of the Man Ray exhibition at MOCA describes by numerical importance the artist's work. It states that "The Lovers" is Man Ray's best painting, his second-best painting is "The Rope Dancer Accompanies Herself With Her Shadows" and the third-best painting is of the Marquis de Sade. Could Mr. Wilson educate me as to what are the sixth-best and fourteenth-best paintings in the Man Ray exhibit? SCOTT BERG Los Angeles
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